PMID- 30379693
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20181031
IS  - 1473-5571 (Electronic)
IS  - 0269-9370 (Linking)
VI  - 32
IP  - 17
DP  - 2018 Nov 13
TI  - Genetic characterization of the HIV-1 reservoir after Vacc-4x and romidepsin
      therapy in HIV-1-infected individuals: Erratum.
PG  - 2649
LID - 10.1097/01.aids.0000547778.59918.66 [doi]
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - England
TA  - AIDS
JT  - AIDS (London, England)
JID - 8710219
EDAT- 2018/11/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/01 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/01 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/01.aids.0000547778.59918.66 [doi]
AID - 00002030-201811130-00026 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - AIDS. 2018 Nov 13;32(17):2649. doi: 10.1097/01.aids.0000547778.59918.66.

PMID- 30379692
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20181031
IS  - 1473-5571 (Electronic)
IS  - 0269-9370 (Linking)
VI  - 32
IP  - 17
DP  - 2018 Nov 13
TI  - Variation in cell-associated unspliced HIV RNA on antiretroviral therapy is
      associated with the circadian regulator brain-and-muscle-ARNT-like-1: Erratum.
PG  - 2643-2647
LID - 10.1097/01.aids.0000547779.98036.2d [doi]
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - England
TA  - AIDS
JT  - AIDS (London, England)
JID - 8710219
EDAT- 2018/11/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/01 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/01 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/01.aids.0000547779.98036.2d [doi]
AID - 00002030-201811130-00025 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - AIDS. 2018 Nov 13;32(17):2643-2647. doi: 10.1097/01.aids.0000547779.98036.2d.

PMID- 30379691
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20181031
IS  - 1473-5571 (Electronic)
IS  - 0269-9370 (Linking)
VI  - 32
IP  - 17
DP  - 2018 Nov 13
TI  - Successful use of the potent enzyme inducer enzalutamide in a
      treatment-experienced HIV-positive male with prostate cancer.
PG  - 2640-2642
LID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002019 [doi]
FAU - Nhean, Salin
AU  - Nhean S
AD  - Department of Pharmacy University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario.
AD  - Chronic Viral Illness Service, McGill University Health Centre.
FAU - Bravo, Jam
AU  - Bravo J
AD  - Department of Pharmacy University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario.
FAU - Sheehan, Nancy L
AU  - Sheehan NL
AD  - Chronic Viral Illness Service, McGill University Health Centre.
AD  - Faculte de pharmacie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec.
FAU - Walmsley, Sharon
AU  - Walmsley S
AD  - Department of Pharmacy University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario.
AD  - Faculties of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Toronto.
FAU - Tilley, David
AU  - Tilley D
AD  - Maple Leaf Medical Clinic, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Tseng, Alice L
AU  - Tseng AL
AD  - Department of Pharmacy University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario.
AD  - Faculties of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Toronto.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - England
TA  - AIDS
JT  - AIDS (London, England)
JID - 8710219
EDAT- 2018/11/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/01 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/01 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002019 [doi]
AID - 00002030-201811130-00024 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - AIDS. 2018 Nov 13;32(17):2640-2642. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002019.

PMID- 30379689
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20181031
IS  - 1473-5571 (Electronic)
IS  - 0269-9370 (Linking)
VI  - 32
IP  - 17
DP  - 2018 Nov 13
TI  - Multidrug nanosuspensions: future perspectives on drug delivery system for HIV
      combination antiretroviral therapy.
PG  - 2629-2631
LID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001971 [doi]
FAU - Tartaglia, Alessandra
AU  - Tartaglia A
AD  - Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Sperimentale, SC Malattie Infettive,
      Universita degli Studi di Foggia, Foggia, Italy.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - England
TA  - AIDS
JT  - AIDS (London, England)
JID - 8710219
EDAT- 2018/11/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/01 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/01 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001971 [doi]
AID - 00002030-201811130-00020 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - AIDS. 2018 Nov 13;32(17):2629-2631. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001971.

PMID- 30379687
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20181031
IS  - 1473-5571 (Electronic)
IS  - 0269-9370 (Linking)
VI  - 32
IP  - 17
DP  - 2018 Nov 13
TI  - Elimination prospects of the Dutch HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men
      in the era of preexposure prophylaxis.
PG  - 2615-2623
LID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002050 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a promising intervention to help end
      the HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the Netherlands. We
      aimed to assess the impact of PrEP on HIV prevalence in this population and to
      determine the levels of PrEP coverage necessary for HIV elimination. DESIGN AND
      METHODS: We developed a mathematical model of HIV transmission in a population
      stratified by sexual risk behavior with universal antiretroviral treatment (ART) 
      and daily PrEP use depending on an individual's risk behavior. We computed the
      effective reproduction number, HIV prevalence, ART and PrEP coverage for
      increasing ART and PrEP uptake levels, and examined how these were affected by
      PrEP effectiveness and duration of PrEP use. RESULTS: At current levels of ART
      coverage of 80%, PrEP effectiveness of 86% and PrEP duration of 5 years, HIV
      elimination required 82% PrEP coverage in the highest risk group (12 000 MSM with
      more than 18 partners per year). If ART coverage increased by 9%, the elimination
      threshold was at 70% PrEP coverage. For shorter PrEP duration and lower
      effectiveness elimination prospects were less favorable. For the same number of
      PrEP users distributed among two groups with highest risk behavior, prevalence
      dropped from the current 8 to 4.6%. CONCLUSION: PrEP for HIV prevention among MSM
      could, in principle, eliminate HIV from this population in the Netherlands. The
      highest impact of PrEP on prevalence was predicted when ART and PrEP coverage
      increased simultaneously and PrEP was used by the highest risk individuals.
FAU - Rozhnova, Ganna
AU  - Rozhnova G
AD  - Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center
      Utrecht, Utrecht.
FAU - Heijne, Janneke
AU  - Heijne J
AD  - Centre for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute of Public Health and
      the Environment, Bilthoven.
FAU - Bezemer, Daniela
AU  - Bezemer D
AD  - Stichting HIV Monitoring, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
FAU - van Sighem, Ard
AU  - van Sighem A
AD  - Stichting HIV Monitoring, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
FAU - Presanis, Anne
AU  - Presanis A
AD  - Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge Institute of Public
      Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
FAU - De Angelis, Daniela
AU  - De Angelis D
AD  - Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge Institute of Public
      Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
FAU - Kretzschmar, Mirjam
AU  - Kretzschmar M
AD  - Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center
      Utrecht, Utrecht.
AD  - Centre for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute of Public Health and
      the Environment, Bilthoven.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - England
TA  - AIDS
JT  - AIDS (London, England)
JID - 8710219
EDAT- 2018/11/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/01 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/01 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002050 [doi]
AID - 00002030-201811130-00018 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - AIDS. 2018 Nov 13;32(17):2615-2623. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002050.

PMID- 30379686
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20181031
IS  - 1473-5571 (Electronic)
IS  - 0269-9370 (Linking)
VI  - 32
IP  - 17
DP  - 2018 Nov 13
TI  - Viremia copy-years and mortality among combination antiretroviral
      therapy-initiating HIV-positive individuals: how much viral load history is
      enough?
PG  - 2547-2556
LID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001986 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Ongoing HIV replication while receiving combination antiretroviral
      therapy (cART) may reduce survival. Viremia copy-years (VCY) has shown improved
      mortality risk prediction over single time-point viral load measures. However,
      the timing of a patient's viral load history most associated with later mortality
      has not been studied. Here we determined the optimal duration and temporality of 
      viral load history for predicting mortality. DESIGN: Survival analysis among
      HIV-positive men who initiated cART in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study
      (1995-2015). METHODS: VCY measures were derived from area-under-the-viral
      load-curve. The overall VCY based upon the complete post-cART viral load history 
      was compared with 20 VCYs derived from viral loads assessed during different
      shorter time periods (the most recent 1-10 years and initial 1-10 years following
      cART initiation) for associations with mortality. RESULTS: Each 10-fold increase 
      in VCYs based on the most recent 3-8 years was significantly associated with
      23-26% decrease in survival times, a magnitude of effect greater than that of the
      most recent viral load (16%). These associations were independent of CD4 cell
      count and single time-point viral loads. In addition, the degree of pre-cART
      immunodeficiency did not affect the mortality prognostic value of VCY based on
      viral loads in the most recent 3 years. Conversely, the overall VCY and VCYs
      based on viral loads immediately following cART initiation were not independent
      predictors of mortality. CONCLUSION: Among cART-treated men, VCY based upon viral
      loads in the recent 3 years (six viral loads) has a mortality prognostic value
      greater than that of the overall VCY and single time-point viral loads, making
      the former a more feasible measure for use.
FAU - Wang, Ruibin
AU  - Wang R
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,
      Baltimore, Maryland.
FAU - Haberlen, Sabina A
AU  - Haberlen SA
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,
      Baltimore, Maryland.
FAU - Palella, Frank J Jr
AU  - Palella FJ Jr
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Northwestern University Feinberg School of
      Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.
FAU - Mugavero, Michael J
AU  - Mugavero MJ
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at
      Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
FAU - Margolick, Joseph B
AU  - Margolick JB
AD  - Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg
      School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
FAU - Macatangay, Bernard J C
AU  - Macatangay BJC
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, University of Pittsburgh,
      Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
FAU - Martinez-Maza, Otoniel
AU  - Martinez-Maza O
AD  - Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular
      Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California.
FAU - Jacobson, Lisa P
AU  - Jacobson LP
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,
      Baltimore, Maryland.
FAU - Abraham, Alison G
AU  - Abraham AG
AD  - Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland,
      USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - England
TA  - AIDS
JT  - AIDS (London, England)
JID - 8710219
EDAT- 2018/11/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/01 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/01 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001986 [doi]
AID - 00002030-201811130-00012 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - AIDS. 2018 Nov 13;32(17):2547-2556. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000001986.

PMID- 30383215
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181101
IS  - 1537-6591 (Electronic)
IS  - 1058-4838 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Nov 1
TI  - A new mechanism of resistance of HIV-2 to integrase inhibitors: a 5 amino-acids
      insertion in the integrase C-terminal domain.
LID - 10.1093/cid/ciy940 [doi]
AB  - Background: Integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTI) are crucial for
      treatment of HIV-2 infection, due to limited available therapeutic options.
      Recently, bictegravir has been approved for HIV-1-infected patients but no data
      are currently available for HIV-2. Methods: We assessed phenotypic susceptibility
      to the five INSTI (bictegravir, cabotegravir, dolutegravir, elvitegravir and
      raltegravir) of 12 HIV-2 clinical isolates obtained from two antiretroviral-naive
      and 10 antiretroviral-experienced patients at virological failure of an
      INSTI-based regimen. 50% Inhibitory Concentrations (IC50) were determined.
      Phenotypic Inhibitory Quotients were determined after measurement of trough INSTI
      plasma concentrations. Results: Wild-type viruses were susceptible to the five
      INSTI with IC50 in the low nanomolar range. Bictegravir had lower IC50 than other
      INSTIs on HIV-2 isolates bearing major resistance-associated mutations (RAM, i.e.
      codons 143, 148 and 155). We identified a new INSTI-resistance profile, a
      5-amino-acids insertion at codon 231 of HIV-2 integrase (231INS) in six patients 
      at virological failure of a raltegravir-based regimen. Those patients had
      adequate raltegravir concentrations but harboured multi-resistant viruses with
      low genotypic susceptibility score (median=1.5). This insertion rendered isolates
      highly resistant to raltegravir and elvitegravir, and moderately resistant to
      dolutegravir and cabotegravir. Regarding bictegravir, two isolates remained
      susceptible and two had a slight increase in IC50 (3- to 5-fold-change).
      Conclusions: Our results confirm the potency of integrase inhibitors on wild-type
      integrase HIV-2 clinical isolates. In addition, we identified a new INSTI
      resistance pathway, 231INS, selected in highly antiretroviral-experienced
      patients with multi-resistant HIV-2 viruses. This highlights the need of a close 
      follow-up of such patients initiating an INSTI-based regimen.
FAU - Le Hingrat, Quentin
AU  - Le Hingrat Q
AD  - IAME, UMR 1137, INSERM, Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, AP-HP,
      Laboratoire de Virologie, Hopital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris, France.
FAU - Collin, Gilles
AU  - Collin G
AD  - IAME, UMR 1137, INSERM, Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, AP-HP,
      Laboratoire de Virologie, Hopital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris, France.
FAU - Le, Minh
AU  - Le M
AD  - IAME, UMR 1137, INSERM, Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, AP-HP,
      Laboratoire de Pharmacologie, Hopital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris, France.
FAU - Peytavin, Gilles
AU  - Peytavin G
AD  - IAME, UMR 1137, INSERM, Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, AP-HP,
      Laboratoire de Pharmacologie, Hopital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris, France.
FAU - Visseaux, Benoit
AU  - Visseaux B
AD  - IAME, UMR 1137, INSERM, Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, AP-HP,
      Laboratoire de Virologie, Hopital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris, France.
FAU - Bertine, Melanie
AU  - Bertine M
AD  - IAME, UMR 1137, INSERM, Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, AP-HP,
      Laboratoire de Virologie, Hopital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris, France.
FAU - Tubiana, Roland
AU  - Tubiana R
AD  - Service de Maladies Infectieuses, AP-HP Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris.
      Sorbonne Universites, Universite Paris 6 - Pierre et Marie Curie, INSERM,
      Institut Pierre Louis d'epidemiologie et de Sante Publique (IPLESP UMRS 1136),
      Paris, France.
FAU - Karmochkine, Marina
AU  - Karmochkine M
AD  - Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Service d'Immunologie Clinique, Paris, France.
FAU - Valin, Nadia
AU  - Valin N
AD  - Hopital St-Antoine, Service de Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, Paris,
      France.
FAU - Collin, Fideline
AU  - Collin F
AD  - Centre de Methodologie et de Gestion, Universite de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
FAU - Lemaignen, Adrien
AU  - Lemaignen A
AD  - CHRU de Tours, Service de Medecine Interne et Maladies Infectieuses, Tours,
      France.
FAU - Bernard, Louis
AU  - Bernard L
AD  - CHRU de Tours, Service de Medecine Interne et Maladies Infectieuses, Tours,
      France.
FAU - Damond, Florence
AU  - Damond F
AD  - IAME, UMR 1137, INSERM, Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, AP-HP,
      Laboratoire de Virologie, Hopital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris, France.
FAU - Matheron, Sophie
AU  - Matheron S
AD  - IAME, UMR 1137, INSERM, Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, AP-HP,
      Service de Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, Hopital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris,
      France.
FAU - Descamps, Diane
AU  - Descamps D
AD  - IAME, UMR 1137, INSERM, Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, AP-HP,
      Laboratoire de Virologie, Hopital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris, France.
FAU - Charpentier, Charlotte
AU  - Charpentier C
AD  - IAME, UMR 1137, INSERM, Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, AP-HP,
      Laboratoire de Virologie, Hopital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris, France.
CN  - ANRS CO5 HIV-2 Cohort
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181101
PL  - United States
TA  - Clin Infect Dis
JT  - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases
      Society of America
JID - 9203213
EDAT- 2018/11/02 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/02 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/02 06:00
PHST- 2018/08/30 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [medline]
AID - 5153362 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/cid/ciy940 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Clin Infect Dis. 2018 Nov 1. pii: 5153362. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciy940.

PMID- 30376083
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20181104
IS  - 1537-6591 (Electronic)
IS  - 1058-4838 (Linking)
VI  - 67
IP  - suppl_1
DP  - 2018 Oct 30
TI  - Pediatric HIV Infection and Decreased Prevalence of OPV Point Mutations Linked to
      Vaccine-associated Paralytic Poliomyelitis.
PG  - S78-S84
LID - 10.1093/cid/ciy635 [doi]
AB  - Background: Mutations associated with prolonged replication of the attenuated
      polioviruses found in oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) can lead to vaccine-derived
      poliovirus (VDPV) and cause paralysis indistinguishable from that caused by wild 
      poliovirus. In response, the World Health Organization has initiated the
      transition to exclusive use of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV), with OPV
      administration in cases of outbreak. However, it is currently unclear how
      IPV-only vaccination, well known to provide humoral but not mucosal immunity,
      will impact the development of paralysis causing OPV variants. Children infected 
      with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been documented to show decreased
      mucosal immunity following OPV vaccination. Thus, HIV-infected children
      vaccinated with OPV may serve as proxy for children with IPV-only vaccination.
      Methods: We conducted a prospective study of Zimbabwean infants receiving OPV as 
      part of their routine vaccination schedule. Stool samples collected from
      OPV-vaccinated children serially until age 24 months were tested for OPV
      serotypes using a real-time polymerase chain reaction protocol that quantifies
      the amount of mutant OPV variants found in each sample. Results: Out of 2130
      stool samples collected from 402 infants 365 stool samples were OPV positive: 313
      from 212 HIV-noninfected (HIV-) infants and 52 from 34 HIV-infected (HIV+)
      infants. HIV- infants showed significantly higher proportions of OPV mutants when
      compared to HIV+ infants. Conclusions: HIV infection is associated with a reduced
      proportion of OPV vaccine associated paralytic polio mutants. These results
      suggest that OPV administered to individuals previously vaccinated only with IPV 
      will show decreased propensity for OPV mutations.
FAU - Halpern, Meira S
AU  - Halpern MS
AD  - Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford University, California.
FAU - Altamirano, Jonathan
AU  - Altamirano J
AD  - Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford University, California.
FAU - Maldonado, Yvonne
AU  - Maldonado Y
AD  - Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford University, California.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - Clin Infect Dis
JT  - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases
      Society of America
JID - 9203213
PMC - PMC6206102
EDAT- 2018/10/31 06:00
MHDA- 2018/10/31 06:00
CRDT- 2018/10/31 06:00
PHST- 2018/10/31 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/10/31 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/10/31 06:00 [medline]
AID - 5146680 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/cid/ciy635 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Clin Infect Dis. 2018 Oct 30;67(suppl_1):S78-S84. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciy635.

PMID- 30383591
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181105
IS  - 1944-7884 (Electronic)
IS  - 1525-4135 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Oct 23
TI  - Genital HIV-1 Shedding with Dolutegravir (DTG) plus Lamivudine (3TC) Dual
      Therapy.
LID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001863 [doi]
FAU - Gianella, Sara
AU  - Gianella S
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases & Global Public Health, University of California 
      San Diego, La Jolla, California.
FAU - Marconi, Vincent C
AU  - Marconi VC
AD  - Emory University, School of Medicine and Rollins School of Public Health,
      Atlanta, Georgia.
FAU - Berzins, Baiba
AU  - Berzins B
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Northwestern University, Chicago.
FAU - Benson, Constance A
AU  - Benson CA
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases & Global Public Health, University of California 
      San Diego, La Jolla, California.
FAU - Sax, Paul
AU  - Sax P
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases Brigham and Women's Hospital Boston,
      Massachusetts.
FAU - Fichtenbaum, Carl J
AU  - Fichtenbaum CJ
AD  - University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati.
FAU - Wilkin, Timothy
AU  - Wilkin T
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York.
FAU - Vargas, Millie
AU  - Vargas M
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases & Global Public Health, University of California 
      San Diego, La Jolla, California.
FAU - Deng, Qianqian
AU  - Deng Q
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases & Global Public Health, University of California 
      San Diego, La Jolla, California.
FAU - Oliveira, Michelli F
AU  - Oliveira MF
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases & Global Public Health, University of California 
      San Diego, La Jolla, California.
FAU - Moser, Carlee
AU  - Moser C
AD  - Department of Biostatistics, Center for Biostatistics and AIDS Research, Harvard 
      TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
FAU - Taiwo, Babafemi O
AU  - Taiwo BO
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Northwestern University, Chicago.
LA  - eng
GR  - P30 AI050409/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/United States
GR  - UM1 AI069471/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/United States
GR  - R21 HD094646/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
GR  - P01 HD040540/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
GR  - R21 AI134295/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/United States
GR  - P30 AI036214/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/United States
GR  - P30 AI117943/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/United States
GR  - U01 AI068634/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181023
PL  - United States
TA  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr
JT  - Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)
JID - 100892005
EDAT- 2018/11/02 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/02 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/02 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001863 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2018 Oct 23. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001863.

PMID- 30383590
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181105
IS  - 1944-7884 (Electronic)
IS  - 1525-4135 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Oct 23
TI  - Opioid Misuse among HIV-Positive Adults in Medical Care: Results from the Medical
      Monitoring Project, 2009 - 2014.
LID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001889 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: People living with HIV are prescribed opioids more often and at
      higher doses than people who do not have HIV, and disproportionately experience
      risk factors for substance use disorder, which suggests they could be at
      increased risk for the misuse of opioids. Researchers also suggest that opioid
      misuse negatively affects various HIV clinical outcomes, increasing the risk of
      transmission to partners with an HIV-negative status. METHODS: We calculated
      weighted percentages and 95% confidence intervals to estimate substance use
      characteristics among a probability sample of 28,162 HIV-positive adults
      receiving medical care in the US who misused opioids (n=975). Then, we used
      Rao-Scott chi2 tests to assess bivariate associations between opioid misuse and
      selected characteristics. RESULTS: In all, 3.3% misused opioids. Misuse was more 
      common among young adults, males, and non-Hispanic whites. Persons who misused
      opioids were less likely to: have been prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ART)
      (88.7%), report being adherent to ART medications in the past 3 days (78.1%), and
      have durable viral suppression (54.3%) than persons who did not misuse opioids
      (92.5%, 87.7%, and 64.7%, respectively). Persons who misused opioids were more
      likely to report condomless sex with partners of negative or unknown HIV status
      while not durably virally suppressed (11.7% vs. 3.4%) than persons who did not
      misuse opioids. CONCLUSIONS: Opioid misuse among adults receiving HIV medical
      care is associated with inadequate ART adherence, insufficient durable viral
      suppression, and higher risk of HIV transmission to sexual partners.
FAU - Lemons, Ansley
AU  - Lemons A
AD  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.
FAU - DeGroote, Nicholas
AU  - DeGroote N
AD  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.
FAU - Perez, Alejandro
AU  - Perez A
AD  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.
FAU - Craw, Jason
AU  - Craw J
AD  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.
FAU - Nyaku, Margaret
AU  - Nyaku M
AD  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.
FAU - Broz, Dita
AU  - Broz D
AD  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.
FAU - Mattson, Christine L
AU  - Mattson CL
AD  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Unintentional Injury
      Prevention.
FAU - Beer, Linda
AU  - Beer L
AD  - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181023
PL  - United States
TA  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr
JT  - Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)
JID - 100892005
EDAT- 2018/11/02 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/02 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/02 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001889 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2018 Oct 23. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001889.

PMID- 30383589
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181105
IS  - 1944-7884 (Electronic)
IS  - 1525-4135 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Oct 23
TI  - Pregnancy and infant outcomes among women using the dapivirine vaginal ring in
      early pregnancy.
LID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001861 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Monthly use of the dapivirine vaginal ring has been shown to be safe 
      and effective for HIV-1 prevention in nonpregnant reproductive-aged women. The
      impact of dapivirine on pregnancy outcomes and infant is not known. We compared
      pregnancy incidence and outcomes by study arm among HIV-1 uninfected women who
      became pregnant while participating in MTN-020/ASPIRE. METHODS: ASPIRE was a
      randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled phase III safety and effectiveness
      study of the dapivirine ring for HIV-1 prevention. Sexually active women aged
      18-45 from Malawi, South Africa, Uganda, and Zimbabwe were enrolled. Urine
      pregnancy tests were performed monthly and, if positive, study product was
      withheld during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Pregnancy-related outcomes included:
      pregnancy incidence, pregnancy outcomes (live birth, preterm birth, pregnancy
      loss, congenital anomalies), and infant growth. RESULTS: Of 2,629 women enrolled 
      in ASPIRE, 169 became pregnant during follow-up, resulting in 179 incident
      pregnancies and 181 pregnancy outcomes. No difference in pregnancy incidence by
      study arm was observed (hazard ratio=0.93; 95% CI 0.68-1.26). The distribution of
      pregnancy outcomes was similar by study arm, and no difference was noted in the
      frequency or pattern of congenital anomalies or infant growth parameters by study
      arm. CONCLUSION: Dapivirine use in the periconception period does not appear to
      be associated with adverse effects on pregnancy or infant outcomes. Our findings 
      provide support for additional safety studies of the dapivirine ring throughout
      pregnancy.
FAU - Makanani, Bonus
AU  - Makanani B
AD  - Johns Hopkins University Research Project.
FAU - Balkus, Jennifer E
AU  - Balkus JE
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington.
AD  - Department of Global Health, University of Washington.
AD  - Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 
      Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Jiao, Yuqing
AU  - Jiao Y
AD  - Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 
      Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Noguchi, Lisa M
AU  - Noguchi LM
AD  - Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
FAU - Palanee-Phillips, Thesla
AU  - Palanee-Phillips T
AD  - Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute, University of the Witwatersrand,
      Johannesburg, South Africa.
FAU - Mbilizi, Yamikani
AU  - Mbilizi Y
AD  - Johns Hopkins University Research Project.
FAU - Moodley, Jothi
AU  - Moodley J
AD  - South African Medical Research Council, Durban, South Africa.
FAU - Kintu, Kenneth
AU  - Kintu K
AD  - Makerere University- Johns Hopkins University Research Collaboration, Kampala,
      Uganda.
FAU - Reddy, Krishnaveni
AU  - Reddy K
AD  - Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute, University of the Witwatersrand,
      Johannesburg, South Africa.
FAU - Kabwigu, Samuel
AU  - Kabwigu S
AD  - Makerere University- Johns Hopkins University Research Collaboration, Kampala,
      Uganda.
FAU - Jeenariain, Nitesha
AU  - Jeenariain N
AD  - South African Medical Research Council, Durban, South Africa.
FAU - Harkoo, Ishana
AU  - Harkoo I
AD  - CAPRISA, Durban, South Africa.
FAU - Mgodi, Nyaradzo
AU  - Mgodi N
AD  - University of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe.
FAU - Piper, Jeanna
AU  - Piper J
AD  - US National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
FAU - Rees, Helen
AU  - Rees H
AD  - Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute, University of the Witwatersrand,
      Johannesburg, South Africa.
FAU - Scheckter, Rachel
AU  - Scheckter R
AD  - FHI 360, Durham, NC, USA.
FAU - Beigi, Richard
AU  - Beigi R
AD  - Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
FAU - Baeten, Jared M
AU  - Baeten JM
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington.
AD  - Department of Global Health, University of Washington.
AD  - Department of Medicine University of Washington.
LA  - eng
GR  - UM1 AI068615/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/United States
GR  - UM1 AI068633/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/United States
GR  - UM1 AI106707/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181023
PL  - United States
TA  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr
JT  - Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)
JID - 100892005
EDAT- 2018/11/02 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/02 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/02 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001861 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2018 Oct 23. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001861.

PMID- 30383588
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181105
IS  - 1944-7884 (Electronic)
IS  - 1525-4135 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Oct 23
TI  - HIV-Related Stigma, Motivation to Adhere to Antiretroviral Therapy, and
      Medication Adherence among HIV-Positive Methadone-Maintained Patients.
LID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001891 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Opioid agonist therapies with methadone are associated with higher
      levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), yet no studies have explored
      factors associated with optimal ART levels in HIV-positive patients on methadone 
      maintenance treatment (MMT), including explanatory pathways using mediation
      analysis. SETTING: Participants included 121 HIV-positive, methadone-maintained
      patients who reported HIV-risk behaviors and were taking ART. METHODS:
      Participants were assessed using an audio-computer assisted self-interview
      (ACASI). Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify significant
      correlates and Process macro to test the explanatory pathway (i.e., mediational
      effect) for optimal ART adherence. RESULTS: Among 121 participants, almost 40%
      reported sub-optimal adherence to ART. Optimal ART adherence was significantly
      associated with being virally suppressed (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) =6.470,
      p=0.038), higher motivation to adhere to ART (aOR=1.171, p=0.011), and lower
      anticipated HIV-related stigma (aOR=0.384, p=0.015). Furthermore, results
      revealed an indirect effect of motivation on the relationship between HIV stigma 
      and ART adherence (Effect=-0.121, p=0.043), thus supporting the mediation effect.
      CONCLUSION: Our findings underscore the complexities surrounding ART adherence,
      even in patients on MMT. These findings provide insights on how to more
      effectively intervene to optimize HIV treatment outcomes, including HIV
      treatment-as-prevention (TasP) initiatives, in methadone-maintained patients.
FAU - Shrestha, Roman
AU  - Shrestha R
AD  - Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA.
AD  - Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy, University of
      Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA.
FAU - Altice, Frederick L
AU  - Altice FL
AD  - Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy, University of
      Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA.
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Yale University 
      School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
AD  - Division of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale University School of Public 
      Health, New Haven, CT, USA.
FAU - Copenhaver, Michael M
AU  - Copenhaver MM
AD  - Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA.
AD  - Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy, University of
      Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181023
PL  - United States
TA  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr
JT  - Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)
JID - 100892005
EDAT- 2018/11/02 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/02 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/02 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001891 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2018 Oct 23. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001891.

PMID- 30383587
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181105
IS  - 1944-7884 (Electronic)
IS  - 1525-4135 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Oct 23
TI  - Effect of TB/HIV Integration on TB and HIV indicators in Rural Ugandan Health
      Facilities.
LID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001862 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: WHO recommends integrating services for patients co-infected with TB 
      and HIV. We assessed the effect of TB/HIV integration on ART initiation and TB
      treatment outcomes among TB/HIV co-infected patients using data collected from 14
      rural health facilities during two previous TB and HIV quality of care studies.
      METHODS: A facility was considered to have integrated TB/HIV services if TB/HIV
      patients had combined treatment for both illnesses by one provider or care team
      at one treatment location. We analyzed the effect of integration by conducting a 
      cross-sectional analysis of integrated and non-integrated facility periods
      comparing performance on ART initiation and TB treatment outcomes. We conducted
      logistic regression, with the patient as the unit of analysis, controlling for
      other intervention effects, adjusting for age and gender, and clustering by
      health facility. RESULTS: From January 2012-June 2014, 996 TB patients were
      registered, 97% were tested for HIV and 404 (42%) were HIV positive. Excluding
      transfers, 296 patients were eligible for analysis with 117 and 179 from
      non-integrated and integrated periods, respectively. Being treated in a facility 
      with TB/HIV integration was associated with lower mortality (adjusted odds ratio 
      [aOR]=0.38, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.18-0.77), but there was no difference 
      in the proportion initiating ART (aOR=1.34, 95% CI=0.40-4.47), with TB treatment 
      success (aOR=1.43, 95% CI=0.73-2.82), lost to follow-up (aOR=1.64, 95%
      CI=0.53-5.04), or failure (aOR=1.21, 95% CI=0.34-4.32). CONCLUSION: TB/HIV
      service integration was associated with lower mortality during TB treatment even 
      in settings with suboptimal proportions of patients completing TB treatment and
      starting on ART.
FAU - Burnett, Sarah M
AU  - Burnett SM
AD  - Africare, Washington, DC, USA.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health
      Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
FAU - Zawedde-Muyanja, Stella
AU  - Zawedde-Muyanja S
AD  - Infectious Diseases Institute, Makerere University College of Health Sciences,
      Kampala, Uganda.
FAU - Hermans, Sabine M
AU  - Hermans SM
AD  - Infectious Diseases Institute, Makerere University College of Health Sciences,
      Kampala, Uganda.
AD  - Department of Global Health, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam,
      Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development, the Netherlands.
FAU - Weaver, Marcia R
AU  - Weaver MR
AD  - Departments of Health Metrics Science and Global Health, University of
      Washington, 2301 Fifth Ave., Suite 600, Seattle, WA, 98121.
FAU - Colebunders, Robert
AU  - Colebunders R
AD  - Global Health Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of
      Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Antwerp, Belgium.
FAU - Manabe, Yukari C
AU  - Manabe YC
AD  - Infectious Diseases Institute, Makerere University College of Health Sciences,
      Kampala, Uganda.
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University
      School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181023
PL  - United States
TA  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr
JT  - Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)
JID - 100892005
EDAT- 2018/11/02 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/02 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/02 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001862 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2018 Oct 23. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001862.

PMID- 30371533
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20181029
IS  - 1944-7884 (Electronic)
IS  - 1525-4135 (Linking)
VI  - 79
IP  - 4
DP  - 2018 Dec 1
TI  - Detectable Plasma HIV RNA Is Associated With Sensory Neuropathy in Patients With 
      HIV Treated Without Stavudine.
PG  - e108-e110
LID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001836 [doi]
FAU - Octaviana, Fitri
AU  - Octaviana F
AD  - Neurology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta,
      Indonesia.
AD  - Neurology Department, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.
FAU - Safri, Ahmad Yanuar
AU  - Safri AY
AD  - Neurology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta,
      Indonesia.
AD  - Neurology Department, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.
FAU - Setiawan, Denise Dewanto
AU  - Setiawan DD
AD  - Neurology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta,
      Indonesia.
FAU - Estiasari, Riwanti
AU  - Estiasari R
AD  - Neurology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta,
      Indonesia.
AD  - Neurology Department, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.
FAU - Imran, Darma
AU  - Imran D
AD  - Neurology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta,
      Indonesia.
AD  - Neurology Department, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.
FAU - Ranakusuma, Teguh
AU  - Ranakusuma T
AD  - Neurology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta,
      Indonesia.
AD  - Neurology Department, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.
FAU - Affandi, Jacquita
AU  - Affandi J
AD  - School of Biomedical Sciences, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia,
      Australia.
FAU - Cherry, Catherine Louise
AU  - Cherry CL
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases, Monash University, Alfred Health, Melbourne,
      Victoria, Australia.
AD  - Burnet Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
AD  - School of Physiology, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
FAU - Price, Patricia
AU  - Price P
AD  - Neurology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta,
      Indonesia.
AD  - School of Biomedical Sciences, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia,
      Australia.
AD  - School of Physiology, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr
JT  - Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)
JID - 100892005
EDAT- 2018/10/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/10/30 06:00
CRDT- 2018/10/30 06:00
PHST- 2018/10/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/10/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/10/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001836 [doi]
AID - 00126334-201812010-00017 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2018 Dec 1;79(4):e108-e110. doi:
      10.1097/QAI.0000000000001836.

PMID- 30371532
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20181029
IS  - 1944-7884 (Electronic)
IS  - 1525-4135 (Linking)
VI  - 79
IP  - 4
DP  - 2018 Dec 1
TI  - Muscle Strength and Aerobic Capacity in HIV-Infected Patients: A Systematic
      Review and Meta-Analysis.
PG  - 491-500
LID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001835 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Physical impairment is highly prevalent in HIV-infected patients. We 
      conducted a systematic review of published studies that included studies
      comparing muscle function in HIV-infected patients to matched healthy controls,
      and studies comparing aerobic capacity in HIV-infected patients with that
      observed in matched healthy controls. DESIGN: Systematic review and
      meta-analysis. METHODS: We searched for references on MEDLINE, SciELO, Cumulative
      Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), and Scopus up to December 2017.
      Weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated, and
      heterogeneity was assessed using the I test. RESULTS: A total of 30 studies,
      covering 2148 healthy controls and 2161 HIV-infected patients, fulfilled the
      inclusion criteria. The average muscle strength and aerobic capacity were
      significantly lower in HIV-infected patients. Meta-analysis revealed
      moderate-quality evidence of weaker muscle strength and aerobic capacity in
      HIV-infected patients. A significant difference in lower-body strength of 1.07
      (95% CI: 0.29 to 1.84) was found for participants in the healthy control group
      compared with HIV group. A significant difference in aerobic capacity (peak VO2) 
      of 8.4 (95% CI: 4.8 to 12.0) was found for participants in the healthy control
      group compared with HIV group. CONCLUSIONS: Muscle strength and aerobic capacity 
      of HIV-infected patients are reduced in comparison with healthy controls.
      Additional studies are needed to define the best interventions to improve the
      physical function in HIV-infected patients.
FAU - Gomes-Neto, Mansueto
AU  - Gomes-Neto M
AD  - Programa de Pos-graduacao em Medicina e Saude da Universidade Federal da Bahia
      (UFBA), Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.
AD  - Departamento de Fisioterapia, Curso de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal da
      Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.
FAU - Rodriguez, Indira
AU  - Rodriguez I
AD  - Programa de Pos-graduacao em Medicina e Saude da Universidade Federal da Bahia
      (UFBA), Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.
FAU - Ledo, Ana P
AU  - Ledo AP
AD  - Programa de Pos-graduacao em Medicina e Saude da Universidade Federal da Bahia
      (UFBA), Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.
FAU - Vieira, Joao P B
AU  - Vieira JPB
AD  - Departamento de Fisioterapia, Curso de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal da
      Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.
FAU - Brites, Carlos
AU  - Brites C
AD  - Programa de Pos-graduacao em Medicina e Saude da Universidade Federal da Bahia
      (UFBA), Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr
JT  - Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)
JID - 100892005
EDAT- 2018/10/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/10/30 06:00
CRDT- 2018/10/30 06:00
PHST- 2018/10/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/10/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/10/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001835 [doi]
AID - 00126334-201812010-00012 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2018 Dec 1;79(4):491-500. doi:
      10.1097/QAI.0000000000001835.

PMID- 30371531
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20181102
IS  - 1944-7884 (Electronic)
IS  - 1525-4135 (Linking)
VI  - 79
IP  - 4
DP  - 2018 Dec 1
TI  - Brief Report: HIV Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Engagement Among Adolescent Men Who
      Have Sex With Men: The Role of Parent-Adolescent Communication About Sex.
PG  - 453-457
LID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001837 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Adolescent men who have sex with men (AMSM) are severely affected by 
      the HIV epidemic in the United States. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has proven
      extremely effective in preventing new HIV infections among adult men who have sex
      with men, but no research has examined PrEP awareness among AMSM. Furthermore,
      initial research investigating PrEP adherence among AMSM has found low adherence 
      to the medication regimen. Effective parent-adolescent communication about sex is
      associated with safer sexual health behaviors among AMSM, and parent-adolescent
      communication is one potential avenue to increase PrEP engagement among AMSM.
      SETTING: Participants included 636 AMSM in the United States who completed a
      cross-sectional online survey in 2015. METHODS: Self-reported data on PrEP
      awareness, attitudes about PrEP, and perceived behavioral control for PrEP usage 
      as well as frequency and quality of parent-adolescent communication about HIV
      were collected from AMSM. Regression models predicting PrEP awareness, attitudes,
      and perceived behavioral control from communication constructs were estimated,
      adjusting for demographic covariates. RESULTS: Sixteen percent of AMSM were aware
      of PrEP. AMSM who reported more frequent communication about HIV with their
      parents were more likely to report being aware of PrEP. Among AMSM aware of PrEP,
      higher quality parent-adolescent communication about HIV was associated with
      higher perceived behavioral control for PrEP usage. CONCLUSIONS: Despite high HIV
      incidence among AMSM in the United States, PrEP awareness is low in this
      population. Effective parent-adolescent communication about HIV and sexual health
      could increase AMSM engagement with PrEP and enhance PrEP adherence within future
      trials among AMSM.
FAU - Thoma, Brian C
AU  - Thoma BC
AD  - Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine,
      Pittsburgh, PA.
FAU - Huebner, David M
AU  - Huebner DM
AD  - Department of Prevention and Community Health, Milken Institute School of Public 
      Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC.
LA  - eng
GR  - F31 MH098739/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
GR  - T32 MH018951/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr
JT  - Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)
JID - 100892005
PMC - PMC6211193
MID - NIHMS1502919
EDAT- 2018/10/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/10/30 06:00
CRDT- 2018/10/30 06:00
PMCR- 2019/12/01 00:00
PHST- 2019/12/01 00:00 [pmc-release]
PHST- 2018/10/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/10/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/10/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001837 [doi]
AID - 00126334-201812010-00007 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2018 Dec 1;79(4):453-457. doi:
      10.1097/QAI.0000000000001837.

PMID- 30383238
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181101
IS  - 1537-6613 (Electronic)
IS  - 0022-1899 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Oct 31
TI  - Characterization of the Genital Mucosa Immune Profile to Distinguish Phases of
      the Menstrual Cycle: Implications for HIV Susceptibility.
LID - 10.1093/infdis/jiy585 [doi]
AB  - Background: Inflammation and immune activation are key factors in sexual
      transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We sought to define the
      impact of hormonal cycling on the mucosal immune environment and HIV risk in sex 
      workers with a natural menstrual cycle. Methods: We compared soluble mucosal
      immune factors and cervical mononuclear cells during hormone titer-defined phases
      of the menstrual cycle among 37 sex workers from Nairobi, Kenya. Systemic and
      mucosal samples were collected 14 days apart to distinguish the follicular and
      luteal phases of the menstrual cycle, and phases were confirmed by hormone
      measurements. Vaginal concentrations of 19 immune modulators and cervical T-cell 
      activation markers were measured. Results: The follicular phase signature was
      characterized by an elevated CCL2 level, decreased interleukin 1alpha and
      interleukin 1beta cervical concentrations, and a significant increase in the
      proportion of CD4+ T cells that expressed CD69. The genital concentration of CCL2
      was the best marker to distinguish the follicular from the luteal phase in
      univariate and multivariate analyses and remained independent of elevated genital
      inflammation and bacterial vaginosis. Conclusion: The follicular phase of the
      menstrual cycle was associated with an elevated CCL2 level and retention of
      resident memory CD4+ T cells, which has implications for increased susceptibility
      to HIV infection.
FAU - Boily-Larouche, Genevieve
AU  - Boily-Larouche G
AD  - Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Winnipeg, Canada.
FAU - Lajoie, Julie
AU  - Lajoie J
AD  - Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Winnipeg, Canada.
AD  - Department Medical Microbiology, University of Nairobi, Winnipeg, Canada.
FAU - Dufault, Brenden
AU  - Dufault B
AD  - George and Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation, Winnipeg, Canada.
AD  - Department of Community Health Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
FAU - Omollo, Kenneth
AU  - Omollo K
AD  - Department Medical Microbiology, University of Nairobi, Winnipeg, Canada.
FAU - Cheruiyot, Juliana
AU  - Cheruiyot J
AD  - Kenya AIDS Control Program, Nairobi, Kenya.
FAU - Njoki, Jane
AU  - Njoki J
AD  - Kenya AIDS Control Program, Nairobi, Kenya.
FAU - Kowatsch, Monika
AU  - Kowatsch M
AD  - Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Winnipeg, Canada.
FAU - Kimani, Makobu
AU  - Kimani M
AD  - Kenya AIDS Control Program, Nairobi, Kenya.
FAU - Kimani, Joshua
AU  - Kimani J
AD  - Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Winnipeg, Canada.
AD  - Kenya AIDS Control Program, Nairobi, Kenya.
FAU - Oyugi, Julius
AU  - Oyugi J
AD  - Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Winnipeg, Canada.
AD  - Department Medical Microbiology, University of Nairobi, Winnipeg, Canada.
FAU - Fowke, Keith R
AU  - Fowke KR
AD  - Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Winnipeg, Canada.
AD  - Department of Community Health Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
AD  - Department Medical Microbiology, University of Nairobi, Winnipeg, Canada.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181031
PL  - United States
TA  - J Infect Dis
JT  - The Journal of infectious diseases
JID - 0413675
EDAT- 2018/11/02 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/02 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/02 06:00
PHST- 2018/04/17 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/10/23 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [medline]
AID - 5151356 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/infdis/jiy585 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - J Infect Dis. 2018 Oct 31. pii: 5151356. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiy585.

PMID- 30371873
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181029
IS  - 1537-6613 (Electronic)
IS  - 0022-1899 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Oct 29
TI  - Sex-Based Differences in HIV-1 Reservoir Activity and Residual Immune Activation.
LID - 10.1093/infdis/jiy617 [doi]
AB  - Plasma HIV-1 RNA levels in women are lower early in untreated HIV-1 infection
      compared to men, but women have higher T-cell activation and faster disease
      progression when adjusted for viral load. It is not known whether these sex
      differences persist during effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), or whether
      they would be relevant for the evaluation and implementation of HIV-1 cure
      strategies. We prospectively enrolled a cohort of reproductive age women and
      matched men on suppressive ART and measured markers of HIV-1 persistence,
      residual virus activity, and immune activation. The frequency of CD4 + T-cells
      harboring HIV-1 DNA was comparable between the sexes, but there was higher
      cell-associated HIV-1 RNA, higher plasma HIV-1 (single copy assay), higher T-cell
      activation and PD-1 expression in men compared to women. These sex-related
      differences in immune phenotype and HIV-1 persistence on ART have significant
      implications for the design and measurement of curative interventions.
FAU - Scully, Eileen P
AU  - Scully EP
AD  - Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA.
AD  - Brigham and Women's Hospital, Division of Infectious Diseases, Boston, MA.
AD  - Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of 
      Infectious Diseases, Baltimore, MD.
FAU - Gandhi, Monica
AU  - Gandhi M
AD  - University of California San Francisco, Department of Medicine, San Francisco,
      CA.
FAU - Johnston, Rowena
AU  - Johnston R
AD  - amfAR The Foundation for AIDS Research, New York, NY.
FAU - Hoh, Rebecca
AU  - Hoh R
AD  - University of California San Francisco, Department of Medicine, San Francisco,
      CA.
FAU - Lockhart, Ainsley
AU  - Lockhart A
AD  - Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA.
FAU - Dobrowolski, Curtis
AU  - Dobrowolski C
AD  - Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.
FAU - Pagliuzza, Amelie
AU  - Pagliuzza A
AD  - Research Centre of the Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal (CRCHUM)
      and Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada.
FAU - Milush, Jeffrey M
AU  - Milush JM
AD  - University of California San Francisco, Department of Medicine, San Francisco,
      CA.
FAU - Baker, Christopher A
AU  - Baker CA
AD  - University of California San Francisco, Department of Medicine, San Francisco,
      CA.
FAU - Girling, Valerie
AU  - Girling V
AD  - University of California San Francisco, Department of Medicine, San Francisco,
      CA.
FAU - Ellefson, Arlvin
AU  - Ellefson A
AD  - Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of 
      Infectious Diseases, Baltimore, MD.
FAU - Gorelick, Robert
AU  - Gorelick R
AD  - AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., Frederick
      National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD.
FAU - Lifson, Jeffrey
AU  - Lifson J
AD  - AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., Frederick
      National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD.
FAU - Altfeld, Marcus
AU  - Altfeld M
AD  - Heinrich-Pette-Institut, Hamburg, Germany.
FAU - Alter, Galit
AU  - Alter G
AD  - Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA.
FAU - Cedars, Marcelle
AU  - Cedars M
AD  - University of California San Francisco, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and 
      Reproductive Sciences, San Francisco, CA.
FAU - Solomon, Ajantha
AU  - Solomon A
AD  - The Peter Doherty Institute of Infection and Immunity, The University of
      Melbourne and Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.
FAU - Lewin, Sharon R
AU  - Lewin SR
AD  - The Peter Doherty Institute of Infection and Immunity, The University of
      Melbourne and Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases, Alfred Hospital and Monash University,
      Melbourne, Australia.
FAU - Karn, Jonathan
AU  - Karn J
AD  - Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.
FAU - Chomont, Nicolas
AU  - Chomont N
AD  - Research Centre of the Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal (CRCHUM)
      and Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada.
FAU - Bacchetti, Peter
AU  - Bacchetti P
AD  - University of California, San Francisco, Department of Epidemiology and
      Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA.
FAU - Deeks, Steven G
AU  - Deeks SG
AD  - University of California San Francisco, Department of Medicine, San Francisco,
      CA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181029
PL  - United States
TA  - J Infect Dis
JT  - The Journal of infectious diseases
JID - 0413675
EDAT- 2018/10/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/10/30 06:00
CRDT- 2018/10/30 06:00
PHST- 2018/08/01 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/10/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/10/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/10/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - 5146028 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/infdis/jiy617 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - J Infect Dis. 2018 Oct 29. pii: 5146028. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiy617.

PMID- 30381490
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181101
IS  - 1098-5514 (Electronic)
IS  - 0022-538X (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Oct 31
TI  - Dolutegravir monotherapy of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques
      selects for several patterns of resistance mutations with variable virological
      outcomes.
LID - JVI.01189-18 [pii]
LID - 10.1128/JVI.01189-18 [doi]
AB  - Drug resistance remains a major concern for HIV treatment. To date, very few
      resistance mutations have emerged in first-line combination therapy that includes
      the integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) dolutegravir (DTG). In vitro, DTG
      selects for several primary mutations that induce low-level DTG resistance;
      secondary mutations, while increasing the level of resistance, however further
      impair replication fitness, which raised the idea that DTG monotherapy may be
      feasible. The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) rhesus macaque model of HIV
      infection can be useful to explore this concept. Nine macaques were infected with
      virulent SIVmac251 and started on DTG monotherapy either during acute (n=2) or
      chronic infection (n=7). Within 4 weeks of treatment, all animals demonstrated a 
      reduction in viremia of 0.8 to 3.5 log RNA copies/ml plasma. Continued treatment 
      led to overall sustained benefits, but the outcome after 10-50 weeks of treatment
      was highly variable, and ranged from viral rebound to near pre-treatment levels, 
      to sustained suppression, with viremia 0.5 to 5 log lower than expected based on 
      pre-treatment viremia. A variety of mutations previously described to confer
      low-level resistance of HIV-1 to DTG or other INSTI were detected, sometimes
      followed by mutations believed to be compensatory. Some mutations, such as G118R,
      previously shown to severely impair replication capacity in vitro, were
      associated with more sustained virologic and immunologic benefits of continued
      DTG therapy, while other mutations such as E92Q and G140A/Q148K were associated
      with more variable outcomes. The observed variability of outcomes in macaques
      warrants avoidance of DTG monotherapy in HIV-infected people.IMPORTANCE A growing
      number of HIV drug combinations are effective in suppressing virus replication in
      HIV-infected persons. However, to reduce their cost and risk for toxicity, there 
      is considerable interest in simplifying drug regimens. A major concern with
      single-drug regimens is the emergence of drug-resistant viral mutants. It has
      been speculated that DTG monotherapy may be a feasible option, because DTG may
      have a higher genetic barrier for the development of drug resistance than other
      commonly used antiretrovirals. To explore treatment initiation with DTG
      monotherapy, we started SIV-infected macaques on DTG either during acute or
      chronic infection. Although DTG initially reduced virus replication, continued
      treatment led to the emergence of a variety of viral mutations, previously
      described to confer low-level resistance of HIV-1 to DTG, and this was associated
      with variable clinical outcomes. This unpredictability of mutational pathways and
      outcomes warns against using DTG monotherapy as initial treatment for
      HIV-infected people.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2018 American Society for Microbiology.
FAU - Van Rompay, Koen Ka
AU  - Van Rompay KK
AD  - California National Primate Research Center and Department of Pathology,
      Microbiology and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Univ. of California, 
      Davis, USA kkvanrompay@ucdavis.edu.
AD  - California National Primate Research Center and Department of Pathology,
      Microbiology and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Univ. of California, 
      Davis, USA.
FAU - Hassounah, Said
AU  - Hassounah S
AD  - McGill University AIDS Centre, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,
      Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
FAU - Keele, Brandon F
AU  - Keele BF
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2381-1151
AD  - AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research,
      Frederick, MD, USA.
FAU - Lifson, Jeffrey D
AU  - Lifson JD
AD  - AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research,
      Frederick, MD, USA.
FAU - Ardeshir, Amir
AU  - Ardeshir A
AD  - California National Primate Research Center and Department of Pathology,
      Microbiology and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Univ. of California, 
      Davis, USA.
FAU - Watanabe, Jennifer
AU  - Watanabe J
AD  - California National Primate Research Center and Department of Pathology,
      Microbiology and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Univ. of California, 
      Davis, USA.
FAU - Pham, Hanh Thi
AU  - Pham HT
AD  - McGill University AIDS Centre, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,
      Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
AD  - Department of Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec,
      Canada.
FAU - Chertova, Elena
AU  - Chertova E
AD  - AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research,
      Frederick, MD, USA.
FAU - Sowder, Raymond
AU  - Sowder R
AD  - AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research,
      Frederick, MD, USA.
FAU - Balzarini, Jan
AU  - Balzarini J
AD  - Rega Institute for Medical Research, KU Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Mesplede, Thibault
AU  - Mesplede T
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0515-9128
AD  - McGill University AIDS Centre, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,
      Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
AD  - Department of Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec,
      Canada.
FAU - Wainberg, Mark A
AU  - Wainberg MA
AD  - McGill University AIDS Centre, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research,
      Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181031
PL  - United States
TA  - J Virol
JT  - Journal of virology
JID - 0113724
EDAT- 2018/11/02 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/02 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/02 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [medline]
AID - JVI.01189-18 [pii]
AID - 10.1128/JVI.01189-18 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - J Virol. 2018 Oct 31. pii: JVI.01189-18. doi: 10.1128/JVI.01189-18.

PMID- 30381486
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181101
IS  - 1098-5514 (Electronic)
IS  - 0022-538X (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Oct 31
TI  - Metagenomic sequencing of HIV-1 in the blood and female genital tract reveals
      little quasispecies diversity during acute infection.
LID - JVI.00804-18 [pii]
LID - 10.1128/JVI.00804-18 [doi]
AB  - Heterosexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is associated
      with a significant bottleneck in the viral quasispecies population, yet the
      timing of that bottleneck is poorly understood. We characterized HIV-1 diversity 
      in the blood and female genital tract (FGT) within two weeks after detection of
      infection in three women enrolled in a unique prospective cohort in South Africa.
      We assembled full-length HIV-1 genomes from matched samples of cervicovaginal
      lavage (CVL) and plasma. Deep sequencing allowed us to identify intrahost single 
      nucleotide variants (iSNVs) and characterize within-sample HIV-1 diversity.Our
      results demonstrated very little HIV-1 diversity in the FGT and plasma by the
      time of detectable viremia. Within each subject, the consensus HIV-1 sequences
      were identical in plasma and CVL. No iSNV was present at >6% frequency. One
      subject had 77 low-frequency iSNVs across both CVL and plasma; another subject
      had 14 iSNVs in only CVL from the earliest time point; and the third subject had 
      no iSNVs in CVL or plasma. Overall, the small amount of diversity that we
      detected was higher in the FGT than plasma and declined over the first two weeks 
      after detectable viremia, compatible with a very early HIV-1 transmission
      bottleneck. To our knowledge, our study represents the earliest genomic analysis 
      of HIV-1 in the FGT after transmission. Further, the use of metagenomic
      sequencing allowed us to characterize other organisms in the FGT, including
      commensal bacteria and sexually transmitted infections, highlighting the utility 
      of this method to sequence both HIV-1 and its metagenomic environment.IMPORTANCE 
      Due to error-prone replication, HIV-1 generates a diverse population of viruses
      within a chronically infected individual. When HIV-1 is transmitted to a new
      individual, one or a few viruses establish the new infection, leading to a
      genetic bottleneck in the virus population. Understanding the timing and nature
      of this bottleneck may provide insight into HIV-1 vaccine design and other
      preventative strategies. We examined the HIV-1 population in three women enrolled
      in a unique prospective cohort in South Africa, who were followed closely during 
      the earliest stages of HIV-1 infection. We found very little HIV-1 diversity in
      the blood and female genital tract during the first two weeks after virus was
      detected in the bloodstream. These results are compatible with a very early HIV-1
      population bottleneck, suggesting the need to study the HIV-1 population in the
      female genital tract before virus is detectable in the bloodstream.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2018 Piantadosi et al.
FAU - Piantadosi, Anne
AU  - Piantadosi A
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5942-1534
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston,
      Massachusetts, United States of America apiantadosi@partners.org
      dkwon@mgh.harvard.edu.
AD  - Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America.
AD  - Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
FAU - Freije, Catherine A
AU  - Freije CA
AD  - Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America.
AD  - Ph.D. Program in Virology, Division of Medical Sciences, Harvard University,
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
FAU - Gosmann, Christina
AU  - Gosmann C
AD  - Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
AD  - Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
      of America.
FAU - Ye, Simon
AU  - Ye S
AD  - Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America.
AD  - Harvard-MIT Program of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
      United States of America.
FAU - Park, Daniel
AU  - Park D
AD  - Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America.
FAU - Schaffner, Stephen F
AU  - Schaffner SF
AD  - Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America.
AD  - FAS Center for Systems Biology, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary
      Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Immunology and Infectious Disease, Harvard School of Public Health,
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
FAU - Tully, Damien C
AU  - Tully DC
AD  - Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
      of America.
FAU - Allen, Todd M
AU  - Allen TM
AD  - Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
      of America.
FAU - Dong, Krista L
AU  - Dong KL
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston,
      Massachusetts, United States of America.
AD  - Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
      of America.
FAU - Sabeti, Pardis C
AU  - Sabeti PC
AD  - Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America.
AD  - FAS Center for Systems Biology, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary
      Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Immunology and Infectious Disease, Harvard School of Public Health,
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
AD  - Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, Maryland, United States of America.
FAU - Kwon, Douglas S
AU  - Kwon DS
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston,
      Massachusetts, United States of America apiantadosi@partners.org
      dkwon@mgh.harvard.edu.
AD  - Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
AD  - Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
      of America.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181031
PL  - United States
TA  - J Virol
JT  - Journal of virology
JID - 0113724
EDAT- 2018/11/02 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/02 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/02 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [medline]
AID - JVI.00804-18 [pii]
AID - 10.1128/JVI.00804-18 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - J Virol. 2018 Oct 31. pii: JVI.00804-18. doi: 10.1128/JVI.00804-18.