PMID- 30745417
OWN - NLM
STAT- PubMed-not-MEDLINE
LR  - 20190416
IS  - 1756-1833 (Electronic)
IS  - 0959-8138 (Linking)
VI  - 364
DP  - 2019 Feb 11
TI  - Australian MPs visit Southport GP to learn about low carb diet for type 2
      diabetes.
PG  - l659
LID - 10.1136/bmj.l659 [doi]
FAU - Feinmann, Jane
AU  - Feinmann J
AD  - London, UK.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190211
PL  - England
TA  - BMJ
JT  - BMJ (Clinical research ed.)
JID - 8900488
EDAT- 2019/02/13 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/13 06:01
CRDT- 2019/02/13 06:00
PHST- 2019/02/13 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/02/13 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/13 06:01 [medline]
AID - 10.1136/bmj.l659 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - BMJ. 2019 Feb 11;364:l659. doi: 10.1136/bmj.l659.

PMID- 30770611
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190216
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 36
IP  - 3
DP  - 2019 Mar
TI  - The James Lind Alliance research priorities for diabetes.
PG  - 267-268
LID - 10.1111/dme.13917 [doi]
FAU - Oliver, N
AU  - Oliver N
AD  - Diabetic Medicine, London, UK.
AD  - Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Imperial College, London, UK.
FAU - Holt, R I G
AU  - Holt RIG
AD  - Diabetic Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
AD  - Human Development and Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton,
      Southampton, UK.
LA  - eng
PT  - Editorial
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2019/02/17 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/17 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/17 06:00
PHST- 2019/02/17 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/02/17 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/17 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13917 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2019 Mar;36(3):267-268. doi: 10.1111/dme.13917.

PMID- 30761589
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190325
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Feb 14
TI  - Diabetes distress in young adults with early-onset Type 1 diabetes and its
      prospective relationship with HbA1c and health status.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13931 [doi]
AB  - AIM: This study aimed to determine cross-sectional relationships between diabetes
      distress and health-related variables, and prospective associations between
      diabetes distress and future glycaemic control (HbA1c ) and health status among
      young adults with early-onset Type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Data were collected from 
      a nationwide cohort study of adults whose Type 1 diabetes onset occurred from 0
      to 4 years of age during 1993-2002. Questionnaire surveys were conducted in
      2012-2013 and 2015-2016 (N = 584). Diabetes distress was assessed via the Problem
      Areas in Diabetes (PAID) scale (0-100 points), depressive symptoms via the
      Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and health status via the 12-Item Short
      Form Health Survey (SF-12) questionnaire. Multivariable linear regression
      analyses were applied to cross-sectional and longitudinal data. RESULTS: In the
      cross-sectional analyses, higher PAID scale total scores (representing higher
      distress levels) were observed in women than in men and in participants with more
      severe depressive symptoms. PAID scores were lower in individuals with better
      physical and mental health. A 1 mmol/mol increase in HbA1c was associated with a 
      0.28-point increase [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.20, 0.36] in diabetes
      distress. In longitudinal analyses adjusting for age, sex, socio-economic index
      and HbA1c at baseline, a 10-point higher PAID score at baseline was associated
      with a 1.82 mmol/mol higher HbA1c level (95% CI 0.43, 3.20) and a 2.48-point
      lower SF-12 mental health score (95% CI -3.55, -1.42) three years later.
      CONCLUSIONS: The cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses results suggest that
      diabetes distress impairs health-related outcomes in young adults with
      early-onset diabetes.
CI  - (c) 2019 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Stahl-Pehe, A
AU  - Stahl-Pehe A
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5281-6023
AD  - Institute for Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Centre, Leibniz Centre
      for Diabetes Research, Dusseldorf, Germany.
AD  - German Centre for Diabetes Research (DZD), Munich-Neuherberg, Germany.
FAU - Glaubitz, L
AU  - Glaubitz L
AD  - Department of Statistics in Medicine, Heinrich Heine University, Dusseldorf,
      Germany.
FAU - Bachle, C
AU  - Bachle C
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1262-7591
AD  - Institute for Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Centre, Leibniz Centre
      for Diabetes Research, Dusseldorf, Germany.
AD  - German Centre for Diabetes Research (DZD), Munich-Neuherberg, Germany.
FAU - Lange, K
AU  - Lange K
AD  - Medical Psychology Unit, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.
FAU - Castillo, K
AU  - Castillo K
AD  - Institute for Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Centre, Leibniz Centre
      for Diabetes Research, Dusseldorf, Germany.
AD  - German Centre for Diabetes Research (DZD), Munich-Neuherberg, Germany.
FAU - Tonnies, T
AU  - Tonnies T
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1577-4212
AD  - Institute for Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Centre, Leibniz Centre
      for Diabetes Research, Dusseldorf, Germany.
AD  - German Centre for Diabetes Research (DZD), Munich-Neuherberg, Germany.
FAU - Yossa, R
AU  - Yossa R
AD  - Institute for Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Centre, Leibniz Centre
      for Diabetes Research, Dusseldorf, Germany.
AD  - German Centre for Diabetes Research (DZD), Munich-Neuherberg, Germany.
FAU - Holl, R W
AU  - Holl RW
AD  - German Centre for Diabetes Research (DZD), Munich-Neuherberg, Germany.
AD  - Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.
FAU - Rosenbauer, J
AU  - Rosenbauer J
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6086-2230
AD  - Institute for Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Centre, Leibniz Centre
      for Diabetes Research, Dusseldorf, Germany.
AD  - German Centre for Diabetes Research (DZD), Munich-Neuherberg, Germany.
LA  - eng
GR  - 01GI0802/Competence Network for Diabetes Mellitus
GR  - 01GI1109A/Competence Network for Diabetes Mellitus
GR  - 82DZD00201/German Centre for Diabetes Research (DZD)
GR  - Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF)
GR  - Ministry of Science and Research of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia
GR  - German Federal Ministry of Health
GR  - 01GI0859/German Competence Network for Diabetes Mellitus
GR  - 01GI1106/German Competence Network for Diabetes Mellitus
GR  - 82DZD01402/DZD
GR  - European Foundation for the Study of Diabetes (EFSD)
GR  - Diabetes Research for Patient Stratification consortium (DIRECT)
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190214
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2019/02/15 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/15 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/15 06:00
PHST- 2019/02/12 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/02/15 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/15 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/02/15 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13931 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2019 Feb 14. doi: 10.1111/dme.13931.

PMID- 30765336
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190215
IS  - 1939-327X (Electronic)
IS  - 0012-1797 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Feb 14
TI  - Fenofibrate Rescues Diabetes-Related Impairment of Ischemia-Mediated Angiogenesis
      by PPARalpha-Independent Modulation of Thioredoxin Interacting Protein.
LID - db170926 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/db17-0926 [doi]
AB  - Fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)
      agonist, reduces lower limb amputations in patients with type 2 diabetes
      mellitus. The mechanism is, however, unknown. Here we demonstrate that
      fenofibrate markedly attenuates diabetes-related impairment of ischemia-mediated 
      angiogenesis. In a murine model of hindlimb ischemia, daily oral fenofibrate
      treatment restored diabetes-impaired blood flow recovery, foot movement, hindlimb
      capillary density, vessel diameter, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)
      signaling to non-diabetic levels in both wildtype and PPARalpha-knockout mice,
      indicating that these fenofibrate effects are largely PPARalpha-independent. In
      vitro, fenofibric acid (FFA) rescued high glucose (25 mM)-induced impairment of
      endothelial cell migration, tubulogenesis and survival, in a
      PPARalpha-independent manner. Interestingly, fenofibrate in vivo and FFA in vitro
      reversed high glucose-induced expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein
      (TXNIP), an exquisitely glucose-inducible gene previously identified as a
      critical mediator of diabetes-related impairment in neovascularization.
      Conversely, adenoviral overexpression of TXNIP abrogated the restorative effects 
      of FFA on high glucose-impaired endothelial cell function in vitro, indicating
      that the effects of FFA are mediated by TXNIP. We conclude that fenofibrate
      rescues diabetic impairment in ischemia-mediated angiogenesis, in large part, by 
      PPARalpha-independent regulation of TXNIP. These findings may therefore explain
      the reduction in amputations seen in diabetic patients treated with fenofibrate.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Yuan, Jun
AU  - Yuan J
AD  - Heart Research Institute, Newtown, NSW, Australia.
AD  - Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
FAU - Tan, Joanne Tm
AU  - Tan JT
AD  - Heart Research Institute, Newtown, NSW, Australia.
AD  - Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
AD  - South Australian Health & Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
AD  - Adelaide Medical School, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, The University
      of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
FAU - Rajamani, Kushwin
AU  - Rajamani K
AD  - Heart Research Institute, Newtown, NSW, Australia.
AD  - Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
AD  - NHMRC Clinical Trial Centre, Camperdown, NSW, Australia.
FAU - Solly, Emma L
AU  - Solly EL
AD  - South Australian Health & Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
FAU - King, Emily J
AU  - King EJ
AD  - Heart Research Institute, Newtown, NSW, Australia.
FAU - Lecce, Laura
AU  - Lecce L
AD  - Heart Research Institute, Newtown, NSW, Australia.
FAU - Simpson, Philippa Jl
AU  - Simpson PJ
AD  - Heart Research Institute, Newtown, NSW, Australia.
FAU - Lam, Yuen Ting
AU  - Lam YT
AD  - Heart Research Institute, Newtown, NSW, Australia.
AD  - Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
FAU - Jenkins, Alicia J
AU  - Jenkins AJ
AD  - Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
AD  - South Australian Health & Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
FAU - Bursill, Christina A
AU  - Bursill CA
AD  - Heart Research Institute, Newtown, NSW, Australia.
AD  - Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
AD  - Adelaide Medical School, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, The University
      of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
AD  - NHMRC Clinical Trial Centre, Camperdown, NSW, Australia.
FAU - Keech, Anthony C
AU  - Keech AC
AD  - Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
AD  - South Australian Health & Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
AD  - Cardiology Department, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, NSW, Australia.
FAU - Ng, Martin Kc
AU  - Ng MK
AD  - Heart Research Institute, Newtown, NSW, Australia mkcng@med.usyd.edu.au.
AD  - Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
AD  - Cardiology Department, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, NSW, Australia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190214
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes
JT  - Diabetes
JID - 0372763
EDAT- 2019/02/16 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/16 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/16 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/06 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/02/07 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [medline]
AID - db17-0926 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/db17-0926 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes. 2019 Feb 14. pii: db17-0926. doi: 10.2337/db17-0926.

PMID- 30765335
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190215
IS  - 1939-327X (Electronic)
IS  - 0012-1797 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Feb 14
TI  - Glucose Metabolism is Required for Platelet Hyperactivation in a Murine Model of 
      Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.
LID - db180981 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/db18-0981 [doi]
AB  - Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have increased thrombosis and
      platelet activation. The mechanisms for platelet hyperactivation in diabetes are 
      incompletely understood. T1DM is accompanied by hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and 
      increased inflammation, in addition to an altered hormonal milieu. In vitro
      analysis of platelets revealed that normal glucose reduces platelet activation
      while hyperglycemic conditions increase platelet activation. We therefore
      hypothesized that hyperglycemia increases platelet glucose utilization, which
      increases platelet activation to promote thrombosis. Glucose uptake and
      glycolysis were increased in platelets isolated from mice treated with
      streptozotocin (STZ), to induce T1DM in concert with induction of glucose
      transporter 3 (GLUT3). Platelets from STZ-treated mice exhibited increased
      activation following administration of PAR4 peptide and convulxin. In contrast,
      platelets isolated from (glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 and GLUT3) double knockout 
      (DKO) mice, which lack the ability to utilize glucose, failed to increase
      activation in hyperglycemic mice. Diabetic mice displayed decreased survival in a
      collagen/epinephrine induced pulmonary embolism model of in vivo platelet
      activation, relative to non-diabetic controls. Survival following pulmonary
      embolism was increased in diabetic DKO mice, relative to non-diabetic controls.
      These data reveal that increased platelet glucose metabolism in vivo, contributes
      to increased platelet activation and thrombosis in a model of T1DM.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Fidler, Trevor P
AU  - Fidler TP
AD  - Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center and Division of Endocrinology 
      and Metabolism, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa.
AD  - Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Columbia University
      Medical Center.
FAU - Marti, Alex
AU  - Marti A
AD  - Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center and Division of Endocrinology 
      and Metabolism, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa.
FAU - Gerth, Katelyn
AU  - Gerth K
AD  - Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center and Division of Endocrinology 
      and Metabolism, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa.
FAU - Middleton, Elizabeth A
AU  - Middleton EA
AD  - Molecular Medicine Program, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah.
FAU - Campbell, Robert A
AU  - Campbell RA
AD  - Molecular Medicine Program, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah.
FAU - Rondina, Matthew T
AU  - Rondina MT
AD  - Molecular Medicine Program, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah.
AD  - GRECC, Department of Internal Medicine, George E. Wahlen VAMC, Salt Lake City,
      Utah.
FAU - Weyrich, Andrew S
AU  - Weyrich AS
AD  - Molecular Medicine Program, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah.
FAU - Abel, E Dale
AU  - Abel ED
AD  - Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center and Division of Endocrinology 
      and Metabolism, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa
      DRCadmin@uiowa.edu.
AD  - Molecular Medicine Program, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190214
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes
JT  - Diabetes
JID - 0372763
EDAT- 2019/02/16 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/16 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/16 06:00
PHST- 2018/09/10 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/02/07 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [medline]
AID - db18-0981 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/db18-0981 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes. 2019 Feb 14. pii: db18-0981. doi: 10.2337/db18-0981.

PMID- 30745441
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190321
IS  - 1939-327X (Electronic)
IS  - 0012-1797 (Linking)
VI  - 68
IP  - 4
DP  - 2019 Apr
TI  - Diabetes Takes New Steps to Increase Transparency and Reproducibility.
PG  - 681-682
LID - 10.2337/dbi19-0008 [doi]
FAU - Myers, Martin G Jr
AU  - Myers MG Jr
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9468-2046
CN  - Diabetes Editorial Team
LA  - eng
PT  - Editorial
DEP - 20190211
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes
JT  - Diabetes
JID - 0372763
EDAT- 2019/02/13 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/13 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/13 06:00
PHST- 2019/02/13 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/13 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/02/13 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dbi19-0008 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dbi19-0008 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes. 2019 Apr;68(4):681-682. doi: 10.2337/dbi19-0008. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

PMID- 30305365
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190208
LR  - 20190215
IS  - 1939-327X (Electronic)
IS  - 0012-1797 (Linking)
VI  - 67
IP  - 12
DP  - 2018 Dec
TI  - Syntaxin 4 Expression in Pancreatic beta-Cells Promotes Islet Function and
      Protects Functional beta-Cell Mass.
PG  - 2626-2639
LID - 10.2337/db18-0259 [doi]
AB  - Syntaxin 4 (Stx4) enrichment in human and mouse islet grafts improves the success
      of transplants in reversing streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in mice,
      although the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Toward a further
      understanding of this, human islets and inducible transgenic mice that
      selectively overexpress Stx4 in islet beta-cells (betaTG-Stx4) were challenged
      with proinflammatory stressors in vitro and in vivo. Remarkably, betaTG-Stx4 mice
      resisted the loss of beta-cell mass and the glucose intolerance that multiple low
      doses of STZ induce. Under standard conditions, glucose tolerance was enhanced
      and mice maintained normal fasting glycemia and insulinemia. Conversely, Stx4
      heterozygous knockout mice succumbed rapidly to STZ-induced glucose intolerance
      compared with their wild-type littermates. Human islet beta-cells overexpressing 
      Stx4 exhibited enhanced insulin secretory capability; resilience against
      proinflammatory cytokine-induced apoptosis; and reduced expression of the CXCL9, 
      CXCL10, and CXCL11 genes coordinate with decreased activation/nuclear
      localization of nuclear factor-kappaB. Finding ways to boost Stx4 expression
      presents a novel potential therapeutic avenue for promoting islet function and
      preserving beta-cell mass.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Oh, Eunjin
AU  - Oh E
AD  - Department of Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
      Research Institute of City of Hope, Duarte, CA.
FAU - Ahn, Miwon
AU  - Ahn M
AD  - Department of Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
      Research Institute of City of Hope, Duarte, CA.
FAU - Afelik, Solomon
AU  - Afelik S
AD  - Department of Surgery/Division of Transplantation, University of Illinois at
      Chicago, Chicago, IL.
FAU - Becker, Thomas C
AU  - Becker TC
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, Duke Molecular Physiology Institute, Duke
      University, Durham, NC.
FAU - Roep, Bart O
AU  - Roep BO
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-1616-8337
AD  - Department of Diabetes Immunology, Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute of 
      City of Hope, Duarte, CA.
FAU - Thurmond, Debbie C
AU  - Thurmond DC
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-6303-4596
AD  - Department of Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
      Research Institute of City of Hope, Duarte, CA dthurmond@coh.org.
LA  - eng
GR  - P30 CA033572/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
GR  - R01 DK067912/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
GR  - R01 DK102233/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
DEP - 20181010
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes
JT  - Diabetes
JID - 0372763
RN  - 0 (Blood Glucose)
RN  - 0 (Cytokines)
RN  - 0 (Qa-SNARE Proteins)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Apoptosis/physiology
MH  - Blood Glucose/*metabolism
MH  - Cytokines/metabolism
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/genetics/*metabolism
MH  - Glucose Intolerance/genetics/*metabolism
MH  - Humans
MH  - Insulin-Secreting Cells/*metabolism
MH  - Mice
MH  - Mice, Knockout
MH  - Qa-SNARE Proteins/genetics/*metabolism
PMC - PMC6245223
EDAT- 2018/10/12 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/09 06:00
CRDT- 2018/10/12 06:00
PMCR- 2019/12/01 00:00
PHST- 2018/03/06 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/09/25 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/12/01 00:00 [pmc-release]
PHST- 2018/10/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/09 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/10/12 06:00 [entrez]
AID - db18-0259 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/db18-0259 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes. 2018 Dec;67(12):2626-2639. doi: 10.2337/db18-0259. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

PMID- 30765436
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190321
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 42
IP  - 4
DP  - 2019 Apr
TI  - Diagnostic Accuracy of a Device for the Automated Detection of Diabetic
      Retinopathy in a Primary Care Setting.
PG  - 651-656
LID - 10.2337/dc18-0148 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: To determine the diagnostic accuracy in a real-world primary care
      setting of a deep learning-enhanced device for automated detection of diabetic
      retinopathy (DR). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Retinal images of people with type
      2 diabetes visiting a primary care screening program were graded by a hybrid deep
      learning-enhanced device (IDx-DR-EU-2.1; IDx, Amsterdam, the Netherlands), and
      its classification of retinopathy (vision-threatening [vt]DR, more than mild
      [mtm]DR, and mild or more [mom]DR) was compared with a reference standard. This
      reference standard consisted of grading according to the International Clinical
      Classification of DR by the Rotterdam Study reading center. We determined the
      diagnostic accuracy of the hybrid deep learning-enhanced device (IDx-DR-EU-2.1)
      against the reference standard. RESULTS: A total of 1,616 people with type 2
      diabetes were imaged. The hybrid deep learning-enhanced device's
      sensitivity/specificity against the reference standard was, respectively, for
      vtDR 100% (95% CI 77.1-100)/97.8% (95% CI 96.8-98.5) and for mtmDR 79.4% (95% CI 
      66.5-87.9)/93.8% (95% CI 92.1-94.9). CONCLUSIONS: The hybrid deep
      learning-enhanced device had high diagnostic accuracy for the detection of both
      vtDR (although the number of vtDR cases was low) and mtmDR in a primary care
      setting against an independent reading center. This allows its' safe use in a
      primary care setting.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Verbraak, Frank D
AU  - Verbraak FD
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7560-1423
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
      f.verbraak@vumc.nl.
FAU - Abramoff, Michael D
AU  - Abramoff MD
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3490-0037
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Iowa Hospital &
      Clinics, Iowa City, IA.
AD  - VA Medical Center, Iowa City, IA.
AD  - IDx, Iowa City, IA.
FAU - Bausch, Gonny C F
AU  - Bausch GCF
AD  - Star-SHL, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
FAU - Klaver, Caroline
AU  - Klaver C
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, Radboud University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the
      Netherlands.
FAU - Nijpels, Giel
AU  - Nijpels G
AD  - Department of General Practice and Elderly Care Medicine, Amsterdam Public Health
      Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
FAU - Schlingemann, Reinier O
AU  - Schlingemann RO
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, Amsterdam Medical Center, Amsterdam, the
      Netherlands.
FAU - van der Heijden, Amber A
AU  - van der Heijden AA
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6383-3187
AD  - Department of General Practice and Elderly Care Medicine, Amsterdam Public Health
      Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190214
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/02/16 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/16 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/16 06:00
PHST- 2018/01/19 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/12/30 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc18-0148 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-0148 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Apr;42(4):651-656. doi: 10.2337/dc18-0148. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

PMID- 30765435
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190321
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 42
IP  - 4
DP  - 2019 Apr
TI  - Antisense Inhibition of Glucagon Receptor by IONIS-GCGRRx Improves Type 2
      Diabetes Without Increase in Hepatic Glycogen Content in Patients With Type 2
      Diabetes on Stable Metformin Therapy.
PG  - 585-593
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1343 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of IONIS-GCGRRx, a
      2'-O-methoxyethyl antisense oligonucleotide targeting the glucagon receptor
      (GCGR), and the underlying mechanism of liver transaminase increases in patients 
      with type 2 diabetes on stable metformin therapy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In
      three phase 2, randomized, double-blind studies, patients with type 2 diabetes on
      metformin received weekly subcutaneous injections of IONIS-GCGRRx (50-200 mg) or 
      placebo for 13 or 26 weeks. RESULTS: Significant reductions in HbA1c were
      observed after IONIS-GCGRRx treatment versus placebo at week 14 (-2.0% 200 mg,
      -1.4% 100 mg, -0.3% placebo; P < 0.001) or week 27 (-1.6% 75 mg, -0.9% 50 mg,
      -0.2% placebo; P < 0.001). Dose-dependent increases in transaminases were
      observed with IONIS-GCGRRx, which were attenuated at lower doses and remained
      mostly within the normal reference range at the 50-mg dose. There were no other
      significant safety observations and no symptomatic hypoglycemia or clinically
      relevant changes in blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, or other vital signs. At
      week 14, IONIS-GCGRRx 100 mg did not significantly affect mean hepatic glycogen
      content compared with placebo (15.1 vs. -20.2 mmol/L, respectively; P = 0.093)
      but significantly increased hepatic lipid content (4.2 vs. -2.7%, respectively; P
      = 0.005) in the presence of transaminase increases. CONCLUSIONS: IONIS-GCGRRx is 
      a potent inhibitor of hepatic glucagon receptor expression with a potential to
      improve glycemic control at low weekly doses in combination with metformin.
      Significant reductions in HbA1c occurred across the full-dose range tested, with 
      minimal transaminase elevations at lower doses. Furthermore, novel results
      suggest that despite inhibition of glycogenolysis after GCGR antagonism,
      IONIS-GCGRRx did not increase hepatic glycogen content.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Morgan, Erin S
AU  - Morgan ES
AD  - Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Carlsbad, CA.
FAU - Tai, Li-Jung
AU  - Tai LJ
AD  - Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Carlsbad, CA.
FAU - Pham, Nguyen C
AU  - Pham NC
AD  - Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Carlsbad, CA.
FAU - Overman, Julia K
AU  - Overman JK
AD  - Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Carlsbad, CA.
FAU - Watts, Lynnetta M
AU  - Watts LM
AD  - Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Carlsbad, CA.
FAU - Smith, Anne
AU  - Smith A
AD  - Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Carlsbad, CA.
FAU - Jung, Shiangtung W
AU  - Jung SW
AD  - Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Carlsbad, CA.
FAU - Gajdosik, Martin
AU  - Gajdosik M
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine III, Medical
      University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
AD  - High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image Guided Therapy, 
      Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
FAU - Krssak, Martin
AU  - Krssak M
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9717-803X
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine III, Medical
      University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
AD  - High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image Guided Therapy, 
      Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
FAU - Krebs, Michael
AU  - Krebs M
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9265-7274
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine III, Medical
      University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
FAU - Geary, Richard S
AU  - Geary RS
AD  - Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Carlsbad, CA.
FAU - Baker, Brenda F
AU  - Baker BF
AD  - Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Carlsbad, CA.
FAU - Bhanot, Sanjay
AU  - Bhanot S
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9538-3491
AD  - Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Carlsbad, CA sbhanot@ionisph.com.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190214
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/02/16 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/16 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/16 06:00
PHST- 2018/06/21 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/01/16 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc18-1343 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1343 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Apr;42(4):585-593. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1343. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

PMID- 30765434
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190321
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 42
IP  - 4
DP  - 2019 Apr
TI  - Occurrence of Diabetic Nephropathy After Renal Transplantation Despite Intensive 
      Glycemic Control: An Observational Cohort Study.
PG  - 625-634
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1936 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: The kinetics and risk factors of diabetic nephropathy after kidney
      transplantation remain unclear. This study investigated the posttransplant
      occurrence of diabetic nephropathy and the contribution of posttransplant
      glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We performed a single-center
      prospective cohort study of 953 renal allograft recipients and 3,458
      protocol-specified renal allograft biopsy specimens up to 5 years after
      transplantation. The effects of pretransplant diabetes and glycemic control
      (glycated hemoglobin levels) on the posttransplant histology were studied.
      RESULTS: Before transplantation, diabetes was present in 164 (17.2%) renal
      allograft recipients, primarily type 2 (n = 146 [89.0%]). Despite intensive
      glycemic control (glycated hemoglobin 7.00 +/- 1.34% [53 +/- 14.6 mmol/mol], 6.90
      +/- 1.22% [52 +/- 13.3 mmol/mol], and 7.10 +/- 1.13% [54 +/- 12.4 mmol/mol], at
      1, 2, and 5 years after transplantation), mesangial matrix expansion reached a
      cumulative incidence of 47.7% by 5 years in the pretransplant diabetes group
      versus 27.1% in patients without diabetes, corresponding to a hazard ratio of
      1.55 (95% CI 1.07-2.26; P = 0.005). Mesangial matrix expansion was not specific
      for diabetic nephropathy and associated independently with increasing age.
      Pretransplant diabetes was associated with posttransplant proteinuria but not
      with estimated glomerular filtration rate, graft failure, or any other structural
      changes of the glomerular, vascular, or tubulointerstitial renal compartments.
      The occurrence of diabetic nephropathy was independent of posttransplant glycated
      hemoglobin levels. CONCLUSIONS: Mesangial matrix expansion, an early indicator of
      diabetic nephropathy, can occur rapidly in patients with diabetes before
      transplantation, despite intensive glycemic control. Prevention of diabetic
      nephropathy requires more than pursuing low levels of glycated hemoglobin.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Coemans, Maarten
AU  - Coemans M
AD  - Laboratory of Nephrology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, KU Leuven,
      Leuven, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation, University Hospitals Leuven, 
      Leuven, Belgium.
AD  - Leuven Biostatistics and Statistical Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Public 
      Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Van Loon, Elisabet
AU  - Van Loon E
AD  - Laboratory of Nephrology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, KU Leuven,
      Leuven, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation, University Hospitals Leuven, 
      Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Lerut, Evelyne
AU  - Lerut E
AD  - Department of Imaging and Pathology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Pathology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Gillard, Pieter
AU  - Gillard P
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9111-4561
AD  - Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology, Department of Chronic Diseases,
      Metabolism and Ageing, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven,
      Belgium.
FAU - Sprangers, Ben
AU  - Sprangers B
AD  - Laboratory of Nephrology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, KU Leuven,
      Leuven, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation, University Hospitals Leuven, 
      Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Senev, Aleksandar
AU  - Senev A
AD  - Laboratory of Nephrology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, KU Leuven,
      Leuven, Belgium.
AD  - Histocompatibility and Immunogenetic Laboratory, Red Cross Flanders, Mechelen,
      Belgium.
FAU - Emonds, Marie-Paule
AU  - Emonds MP
AD  - Histocompatibility and Immunogenetic Laboratory, Red Cross Flanders, Mechelen,
      Belgium.
FAU - Van Keer, Jan
AU  - Van Keer J
AD  - Laboratory of Nephrology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, KU Leuven,
      Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Callemeyn, Jasper
AU  - Callemeyn J
AD  - Laboratory of Nephrology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, KU Leuven,
      Leuven, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation, University Hospitals Leuven, 
      Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Daniels, Liesbeth
AU  - Daniels L
AD  - Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology, Department of Chronic Diseases,
      Metabolism and Ageing, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Sichien, Jeroen
AU  - Sichien J
AD  - Leuven Biostatistics and Statistical Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Public 
      Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Verbeke, Geert
AU  - Verbeke G
AD  - Leuven Biostatistics and Statistical Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Public 
      Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Kuypers, Dirk
AU  - Kuypers D
AD  - Laboratory of Nephrology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, KU Leuven,
      Leuven, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation, University Hospitals Leuven, 
      Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Mathieu, Chantal
AU  - Mathieu C
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6099-2406
AD  - Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology, Department of Chronic Diseases,
      Metabolism and Ageing, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven,
      Belgium.
FAU - Naesens, Maarten
AU  - Naesens M
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5625-0792
AD  - Laboratory of Nephrology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, KU Leuven,
      Leuven, Belgium maarten.naesens@uzleuven.be.
AD  - Department of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation, University Hospitals Leuven, 
      Leuven, Belgium.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190214
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/02/16 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/16 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/16 06:00
PHST- 2018/09/14 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/01/14 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc18-1936 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1936 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Apr;42(4):625-634. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1936. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

PMID- 30765433
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190401
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Feb 14
TI  - Effect of a Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention in People With Serious Mental
      Illness and Diabetes.
LID - dc182201 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-2201 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Given the high prevalence of obesity and diabetes in patients with
      serious mental illness (SMI) and the lack of evidence on the effects of weight
      loss programs in SMI patients with diabetes, we evaluated the effectiveness of a 
      behavioral weight loss intervention among SMI participants with and without
      diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Using data from ACHIEVE, a randomized
      controlled trial to evaluate the effects of a behavioral weight loss intervention
      among overweight/obese people with SMI, we assessed and compared weight change
      from baseline to 18 months in participants with and without diabetes using a
      longitudinal mixed-effects model. RESULTS: Of the 291 trial participants, 82
      (28.2%) participants had diabetes (34 and 48 in intervention and control groups, 
      respectively) at baseline. Participants with diabetes were more likely to be
      taking antipsychotics (31.7% vs. 18.7%, P = 0.02). At 18 months, participants in 
      the control group with diabetes lost 1.2 lb (0.6%) of body weight compared with
      0.8 lb (0.7%) among those without diabetes. In the intervention group,
      participants with diabetes lost 13.7 lb (6.6%) of their initial body weight
      compared with 5.4 lb (2.9%) for those without diabetes. Corresponding net effects
      (intervention minus control) were 4.6 lb (2.2%) and 12.5 lb (6.0%) net weight
      reduction over 18 months in the no diabetes and the diabetes subgroups,
      respectively. However, the between-group difference in intervention effects was
      statistically nonsignificant (absolute weight change: P-interaction = 0.08; %
      weight change: P-interaction = 0.10). CONCLUSIONS: A behavioral weight loss
      intervention is effective among overweight and obese individuals with SMI
      regardless of their diabetes status.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Tseng, Eva
AU  - Tseng E
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4001-2869
AD  - Division of General Internal Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of
      Medicine, Baltimore, MD etseng3@jhmi.edu.
AD  - Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, The Johns
      Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.
FAU - Dalcin, Arlene T
AU  - Dalcin AT
AD  - Division of General Internal Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of
      Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
AD  - Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, The Johns
      Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.
FAU - Jerome, Gerald J
AU  - Jerome GJ
AD  - Towson University, Baltimore, MD.
FAU - Gennusa, Joseph V
AU  - Gennusa JV
AD  - Division of General Internal Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of
      Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
FAU - Goldsholl, Stacy
AU  - Goldsholl S
AD  - Division of General Internal Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of
      Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
FAU - Cook, Courtney
AU  - Cook C
AD  - Division of General Internal Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of
      Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
FAU - Appel, Lawrence J
AU  - Appel LJ
AD  - Division of General Internal Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of
      Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
AD  - Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, The Johns
      Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of
      Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
FAU - Maruthur, Nisa M
AU  - Maruthur NM
AD  - Division of General Internal Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of
      Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
AD  - Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, The Johns
      Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of
      Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
FAU - Daumit, Gail L
AU  - Daumit GL
AD  - Division of General Internal Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of
      Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
AD  - Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, The Johns
      Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.
AD  - Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University
      School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
AD  - Department of Mental Health, The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of
      Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
FAU - Wang, Nae-Yuh
AU  - Wang NY
AD  - Division of General Internal Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of
      Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
AD  - Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, The Johns
      Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of
      Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
AD  - Department of Biostatistics, The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of
      Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
LA  - eng
GR  - P50 MH115842/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190214
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/02/16 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/16 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/16 06:00
PHST- 2018/10/22 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/01/21 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-2201 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-2201 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Feb 14. pii: dc18-2201. doi: 10.2337/dc18-2201.

PMID- 30765432
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190321
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 42
IP  - 4
DP  - 2019 Apr
TI  - Overall Quality of Care Predicts the Variability of Key Risk Factors for
      Complications in Type 2 Diabetes: An Observational, Longitudinal Retrospective
      Study.
PG  - 514-519
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1471 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: An association between variability in clinical parameters (HbA1c,
      blood pressure, cholesterol, and uric acid) and risk of complications in type 2
      diabetes has been reported. In this analysis, we investigated to what extent such
      variability is associated with overall quality of care. RESEARCH DESIGN AND
      METHODS: The quality of care summary score (Q-score) represents a validated,
      overall quality of care indicator ranging between 0 and 40; the higher the score,
      the better the quality of care provided by the diabetes center. We identified
      patients with five or more measurements of clinical parameters after the
      assessment of the Q-score. Multiple linear regression analyses assessed the role 
      of the Q-score in predicting the variability of the different parameters.
      RESULTS: Overall, 273,888 patients were analyzed. The variability of all the
      parameters systematically increased with decreasing Q-score values. At
      multivariate linear regression analysis, compared with a Q-score >25, a score <15
      was associated with a significantly larger variation in HbA1c, blood pressure,
      uric acid, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol and a lower variation in HDL
      cholesterol. The analysis of standardized beta coefficients show that the Q-score
      has a larger impact on the variability of HbA1c (0.34; P < 0.0001), systolic
      blood pressure (0.21; P < 0.0001), total cholesterol (0.21; P < 0.0001), and LDL 
      cholesterol (0.20; P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The variability of risk factors for 
      diabetic complications is associated with quality of care. Quality of care
      improvement initiatives should be targeted to increase the achievement of the
      recommended target while reducing such variability.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Ceriello, Antonio
AU  - Ceriello A
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7955-4684
AD  - Insititut d'Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona,
      Spain aceriell@clinic.cat.
AD  - Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metabolicas
      Asociadas (CIBERDEM), Barcelona, Spain.
AD  - Department of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, IRCCS MultiMedica, Sesto San
      Giovanni, Milan, Italy.
FAU - Rossi, Maria Chiara
AU  - Rossi MC
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8696-4238
AD  - Center for Outcomes Research and Clinical Epidemiology (CORESEARCH), Pescara,
      Italy.
FAU - De Cosmo, Salvatore
AU  - De Cosmo S
AD  - Department of Medical Sciences, Scientific Institute "Casa Sollievo della
      Sofferenza," San Giovanni Rotondo, Foggia, Italy.
FAU - Lucisano, Giuseppe
AU  - Lucisano G
AD  - Center for Outcomes Research and Clinical Epidemiology (CORESEARCH), Pescara,
      Italy.
FAU - Pontremoli, Roberto
AU  - Pontremoli R
AD  - Department of Cardionephrology, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San
      Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy.
FAU - Fioretto, Paola
AU  - Fioretto P
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Padua, Italy.
FAU - Giorda, Carlo
AU  - Giorda C
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4709-8696
AD  - Diabetes and Metabolism Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, ASL Turin 5,
      Chieri, Turin, Italy.
FAU - Pacilli, Antonio
AU  - Pacilli A
AD  - Department of Medical Sciences, Scientific Institute "Casa Sollievo della
      Sofferenza," San Giovanni Rotondo, Foggia, Italy.
FAU - Viazzi, Francesca
AU  - Viazzi F
AD  - Department of Cardionephrology, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San
      Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy.
FAU - Russo, Giuseppina
AU  - Russo G
AD  - Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, Messina,
      Italy.
FAU - Nicolucci, Antonio
AU  - Nicolucci A
CN  - AMD-Annals Study Group
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190214
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/02/16 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/16 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/16 06:00
PHST- 2018/07/10 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/01/15 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc18-1471 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1471 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Apr;42(4):514-519. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1471. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

PMID- 30765430
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190215
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Feb 14
TI  - Diabetes Distress, Intentional Hyperglycemia at Work, and Glycemic Control Among 
      Workers With Type 1 Diabetes.
LID - dc181426 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1426 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: The aim was to explore relationships between work-related factors,
      work-related diabetes distress (WRDD), diabetes distress (measured by Problem
      Areas in Diabetes [PAID]-5 scale), intentional hyperglycemia at work (IHW), and
      glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was
      conducted with 1,030 working adults with type 1 diabetes and linked with
      electronic health record data from a specialist diabetes clinic in Denmark. With 
      use of structural equation modeling, two alternative models were compared, based 
      on fit indices, statistical significance, and theoretical meaningfulness.
      RESULTS: A combined model provided the best fit to the data. WRDD was more
      strongly affected by work ability, opportunity to self-manage at work, being
      treated differently, and job demands. PAID-5 was more strongly affected by
      identity concern and blame and judgment. Both PAID-5 and WRDD were associated
      with more frequent IHW, which was associated in turn with worse glycemic control.
      CONCLUSIONS: Work-related factors are associated with WRDD and PAID-5. Distress
      increases the frequency of IHW, which is, in turn, associated with worse glycemic
      control. Future studies should investigate ways to balance diabetes management
      and work life without compromising diabetes care.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Hansen, Ulla M
AU  - Hansen UM
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8416-9783
AD  - Diabetes Management Research, Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte,
      Denmark.
AD  - National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, 
      Denmark.
FAU - Skinner, Timothy
AU  - Skinner T
AD  - Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
FAU - Olesen, Kasper
AU  - Olesen K
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3638-4005
AD  - Diabetes Management Research, Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte,
      Denmark.
FAU - Willaing, Ingrid
AU  - Willaing I
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3082-8816
AD  - Diabetes Management Research, Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark
      ingrid.willaing.tapager@regionh.dk.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190214
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/02/16 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/16 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/16 06:00
PHST- 2018/07/04 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/01/21 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-1426 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1426 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Feb 14. pii: dc18-1426. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1426.

PMID- 30765429
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190321
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 42
IP  - 4
DP  - 2019 Apr
TI  - Comparative Effects of Proximal and Distal Small Intestinal Glucose Exposure on
      Glycemia, Incretin Hormone Secretion, and the Incretin Effect in Health and Type 
      2 Diabetes.
PG  - 520-528
LID - 10.2337/dc18-2156 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Cells releasing glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and
      glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) are distributed predominately in the proximal and
      distal gut, respectively. Hence, the region of gut exposed to nutrients may
      influence GIP and GLP-1 secretion and impact on the incretin effect and
      gastrointestinal-mediated glucose disposal (GIGD). We evaluated glycemic and
      incretin responses to glucose administered into the proximal or distal small
      intestine and quantified the corresponding incretin effect and GIGD in health and
      type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Ten healthy
      subjects and 10 patients with T2DM were each studied on four occasions. On two
      days, a transnasal catheter was positioned with infusion ports opening 13 cm and 
      190 cm beyond the pylorus, and 30 g glucose with 3 g 3-O-methylglucose (a marker 
      of glucose absorption) was infused into either site and 0.9% saline into the
      alternate site over 60 min. Matching intravenous isoglycemic clamp studies were
      performed on the other two days. Blood glucose, serum 3-O-methylglucose, and
      plasma hormones were evaluated over 180 min. RESULTS: In both groups, blood
      glucose and serum 3-O-methylglucose concentrations were higher after proximal
      than distal glucose infusion (all P < 0.001). Plasma GLP-1 increased minimally
      after proximal, but substantially after distal, glucose infusion, whereas GIP
      increased promptly after both infusions, with concentrations initially greater,
      but less sustained, with proximal versus distal infusion (all P < 0.001). Both
      the incretin effect and GIGD were less with proximal than distal glucose infusion
      (both P </= 0.009). CONCLUSIONS: The distal, as opposed to proximal, small
      intestine is superior in modulating postprandial glucose metabolism in both
      health and T2DM.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Zhang, Xiang
AU  - Zhang X
AD  - Adelaide Medical School and Centre of Research Excellence in Translating
      Nutritional Science to Good Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South
      Australia, Australia.
AD  - Department of General Surgery, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan,
      Shandong, China.
FAU - Young, Richard L
AU  - Young RL
AD  - Adelaide Medical School and Centre of Research Excellence in Translating
      Nutritional Science to Good Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South
      Australia, Australia.
AD  - Nutrition and Metabolism, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute,
      Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
FAU - Bound, Michelle
AU  - Bound M
AD  - Adelaide Medical School and Centre of Research Excellence in Translating
      Nutritional Science to Good Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South
      Australia, Australia.
FAU - Hu, Sanyuan
AU  - Hu S
AD  - Department of General Surgery, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan,
      Shandong, China.
FAU - Jones, Karen L
AU  - Jones KL
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1155-5816
AD  - Adelaide Medical School and Centre of Research Excellence in Translating
      Nutritional Science to Good Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South
      Australia, Australia.
AD  - Endocrine and Metabolic Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia,
      Australia.
FAU - Horowitz, Michael
AU  - Horowitz M
AD  - Adelaide Medical School and Centre of Research Excellence in Translating
      Nutritional Science to Good Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South
      Australia, Australia.
AD  - Endocrine and Metabolic Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia,
      Australia.
FAU - Rayner, Christopher K
AU  - Rayner CK
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5527-256X
AD  - Adelaide Medical School and Centre of Research Excellence in Translating
      Nutritional Science to Good Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South
      Australia, Australia.
FAU - Wu, Tongzhi
AU  - Wu T
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1656-9210
AD  - Adelaide Medical School and Centre of Research Excellence in Translating
      Nutritional Science to Good Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South
      Australia, Australia tongzhi.wu@adelaide.edu.au.
AD  - Endocrine and Metabolic Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia,
      Australia.
AD  - Institute of Diabetes, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing,
      Jiangsu, China.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190214
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/02/16 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/16 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/16 06:00
PHST- 2018/10/15 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/01/16 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc18-2156 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-2156 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Apr;42(4):520-528. doi: 10.2337/dc18-2156. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

PMID- 30765428
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190215
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Feb 14
TI  - Suboptimal Nocturnal Glucose Control Is Associated With Large for Gestational Age
      in Treated Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.
LID - dc182212 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-2212 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) provides far greater detail about 
      fetal exposure to maternal glucose across the 24-h day. Our aim was to examine
      the role of temporal glucose variation on the development of large for
      gestational age (LGA) infants in women with treated gestational diabetes mellitus
      (GDM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We performed a prospective observational
      study of 162 pregnant women with GDM in specialist multidisciplinary antenatal
      diabetes clinics. Participants undertook 7-day masked CGM at 30-32 weeks'
      gestation. Standard summary indices and glycemic variability measures of CGM were
      calculated. Functional data analysis was applied to determine differences in
      temporal glucose profiles. LGA was defined as birth weight >/=90th percentile
      adjusted for infant sex, gestational age, maternal BMI, ethnicity, and parity.
      RESULTS: Mean glucose was significantly higher in women who delivered an LGA
      infant (6.2 vs. 5.8 mmol/L, P = 0.025, or 111.6 mg/dL vs. 104.4 mg/dL). There
      were no significant differences in percentage time in, above, or below the target
      glucose range or in glucose variability measures (all P > 0.05). Functional data 
      analysis revealed that the higher mean glucose was driven by a significantly
      higher glucose for 6 h overnight (0030-0630 h) in mothers of LGA infants (6.0 +/-
      1.0 mmol/L vs. 5.5 +/- 0.8 mmol/L, P = 0.005, and 108.0 +/- 18.0 mg/dL vs. 99.0
      +/- 14.4 mg/dL). CONCLUSIONS: Mothers of LGA infants run significantly higher
      glucose overnight compared with mothers without LGA. Detecting and addressing
      nocturnal glucose control may help to further reduce rates of LGA in women with
      GDM.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Law, Graham R
AU  - Law GR
AD  - School of Health and Social Care, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, U.K.
FAU - Alnaji, Alia
AU  - Alnaji A
AD  - Division of Clinical and Population Sciences, Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular
      and Metabolic Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, U.K.
FAU - Alrefaii, Lina
AU  - Alrefaii L
AD  - Division of Clinical and Population Sciences, Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular
      and Metabolic Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, U.K.
FAU - Endersby, Del
AU  - Endersby D
AD  - Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, U.K.
FAU - Cartland, Sarah J
AU  - Cartland SJ
AD  - Division of Clinical and Population Sciences, Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular
      and Metabolic Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, U.K.
AD  - Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, U.K.
FAU - Gilbey, Stephen G
AU  - Gilbey SG
AD  - Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, U.K.
FAU - Jennings, Paul E
AU  - Jennings PE
AD  - York NHS Foundation Trust, York, U.K.
FAU - Murphy, Helen R
AU  - Murphy HR
AD  - Division of Maternal Health, St Thomas' Hospital, King's College London, London, 
      U.K.
FAU - Scott, Eleanor M
AU  - Scott EM
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5395-8261
AD  - Division of Clinical and Population Sciences, Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular
      and Metabolic Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, U.K. e.m.scott@leeds.ac.uk.
AD  - Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, U.K.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190214
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/02/16 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/16 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/16 06:00
PHST- 2018/10/24 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/01/22 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-2212 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-2212 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Feb 14. pii: dc18-2212. doi: 10.2337/dc18-2212.

PMID- 30739885
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190223
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Feb 10
TI  - Seasonal Variations in the Achievement of Guideline Targets for HbA1c, Blood
      Pressure, and Cholesterol Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Nationwide
      Population-Based Study (ABC Study JDDM49).
LID - dc181953 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1953 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Precise monthly achievement rates for reaching guideline targets for
      HbA1c, blood pressure (BP), and lipid levels remain unknown. We evaluated
      achievement rates on a monthly basis in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus
      (T2DM) and explored related factors. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This
      retrospective study initially analyzed data on 104,601 persons with T2DM
      throughout Japan. Patients whose HbA1c, BP, and LDL cholesterol were measured
      >/=12 times during a 24-month period were included. We evaluated monthly
      achievement rates. Achieved targets were defined as HbA1c <7%, BP <130/80 mmHg,
      and LDL cholesterol <100 mg/dL. Achievement of all targets was expressed as the
      "all ABC achievement." RESULTS: A total of 4,678 patients were analyzed. The
      achievement rates of all ABC, HbA1c, BP, and LDL cholesterol were lowest in
      winter, with those for systolic BP (SBP) being particularly low (all ABC, summer 
      15.6%, winter 9.6%; HbA1c, 53.1%, 48.9%; SBP, 56.6%, 40.9%; LDL cholesterol,
      50.8%, 47.2%). In winter, age >/=65 years (odds ratio 0.47 [95% CI 0.34-0.63])
      was independently related to decreased achievement rates for SBP, BMI >/=25
      kg/m(2) (BMI 25-30 kg/m(2) 0.45 [0.29-0.70]; BMI >/=30 kg/m(2) 0.35 [0.22-0.57]),
      and diabetes duration >/=10 years (0.53 [0.37-0.76]) were independently related
      to lower achievement rates for HbA1c. Insulin use and sulfonylurea use were
      independently associated with the decreased all ABC achievement rates in both
      summer and winter. CONCLUSIONS: The all ABC achievement rate for guideline
      targets changed on a monthly basis. Seasonal variations in the all ABC
      achievement rate should be considered when managing T2DM in ordinary clinical
      practices.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Sakamoto, Masaya
AU  - Sakamoto M
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7839-0780
AD  - Division of Diabetes, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Department of Internal
      Medicine, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
      m-sakamoto@umin.ac.jp.
FAU - Matsutani, Daisuke
AU  - Matsutani D
AD  - Division of Diabetes, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Department of Internal
      Medicine, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
FAU - Minato, Soichiro
AU  - Minato S
AD  - Division of Diabetes, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Department of Internal
      Medicine, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
FAU - Tsujimoto, Yuki
AU  - Tsujimoto Y
AD  - Division of Diabetes, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Department of Internal
      Medicine, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
FAU - Kayama, Yosuke
AU  - Kayama Y
AD  - Department of Cardiology, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Minato-ku,
      Tokyo, Japan.
FAU - Takeda, Norihiko
AU  - Takeda N
AD  - Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The
      University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
FAU - Ichikawa, Seiichi
AU  - Ichikawa S
AD  - Department of Cardiology, Tsuruoka Kyoritsu Hospital, Tsuruoka-shi, Yamagata,
      Japan.
FAU - Horiuchi, Ryuzo
AU  - Horiuchi R
AD  - Department of Pathology, Tsuruoka Kyoritsu Hospital, Tsuruoka-shi, Yamagata,
      Japan.
FAU - Utsunomiya, Kazunori
AU  - Utsunomiya K
AD  - Division of Diabetes, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Department of Internal
      Medicine, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
FAU - Nishikawa, Masako
AU  - Nishikawa M
AD  - Clinical Research Support Center, The Jikei University School of Medicine,
      Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190210
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/02/12 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/12 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/12 06:00
PHST- 2018/09/24 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/01/23 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/02/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/12 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/02/12 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc18-1953 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1953 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Feb 10. pii: dc18-1953. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1953.

PMID- 30348844
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190205
LR  - 20190215
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 41
IP  - 11
DP  - 2018 Nov
TI  - Clinical Implications of Real-time and Intermittently Scanned Continuous Glucose 
      Monitoring.
PG  - 2265-2274
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1150 [doi]
AB  - Two types of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems are now available:
      real-time CGM (rtCGM) and intermittently scanned (isCGM). Current rtCGM systems
      automatically transmit a continuous stream of glucose data to the user, provide
      alerts and active alarms, and transmit glucose data (trend and numerical) in real
      time to a receiver, smart watch, or smartphone. The current isCGM system provides
      the same type of glucose data but requires the user to purposely scan the sensor 
      to obtain information, and it does not have alerts and alarms. Both CGM
      technologies have significant advantages over self-monitoring of blood glucose;
      however, differences in the features and capabilities of the two approaches must 
      be considered when guiding patient selection of the system that meets their
      individual needs.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Edelman, Steven V
AU  - Edelman SV
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-0760-9332
AD  - University of California, San Diego, and Taking Control of Your Diabetes, San
      Diego, CA sedelman@ucsd.edu.
FAU - Argento, Nicholas B
AU  - Argento NB
AD  - Maryland Endocrine, Columbia, MD.
FAU - Pettus, Jeremy
AU  - Pettus J
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-5999-0091
AD  - Clinical and Translational Research Institute and University of California, San
      Diego, San Diego, CA.
FAU - Hirsch, Irl B
AU  - Hirsch IB
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-1675-8417
AD  - University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
RN  - 0 (Blood Glucose)
SB  - IM
MH  - Blood Glucose/*analysis
MH  - Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring/methods
MH  - *Computer Systems/standards
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus/*blood/therapy
MH  - Equipment Design
MH  - *Equipment and Supplies/standards
MH  - Humans
MH  - Patient Selection
MH  - Smartphone
EDAT- 2018/10/24 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/06 06:00
CRDT- 2018/10/24 06:00
PHST- 2018/05/25 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/08/14 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/10/24 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/10/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/06 06:00 [medline]
AID - 41/11/2265 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1150 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2018 Nov;41(11):2265-2274. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1150.

PMID- 30224348
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190205
LR  - 20190215
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 41
IP  - 11
DP  - 2018 Nov
TI  - Glucose Management Indicator (GMI): A New Term for Estimating A1C From Continuous
      Glucose Monitoring.
PG  - 2275-2280
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1581 [doi]
AB  - While A1C is well established as an important risk marker for diabetes
      complications, with the increasing use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) to 
      help facilitate safe and effective diabetes management, it is important to
      understand how CGM metrics, such as mean glucose, and A1C correlate. Estimated
      A1C (eA1C) is a measure converting the mean glucose from CGM or self-monitored
      blood glucose readings, using a formula derived from glucose readings from a
      population of individuals, into an estimate of a simultaneously measured
      laboratory A1C. Many patients and clinicians find the eA1C to be a helpful
      educational tool, but others are often confused or even frustrated if the eA1C
      and laboratory-measured A1C do not agree. In the U.S., the Food and Drug
      Administration determined that the nomenclature of eA1C needed to change. This
      led the authors to work toward a multipart solution to facilitate the retention
      of such a metric, which includes renaming the eA1C the glucose management
      indicator (GMI) and generating a new formula for converting CGM-derived mean
      glucose to GMI based on recent clinical trials using the most accurate CGM
      systems available. The final aspect of ensuring a smooth transition from the old 
      eA1C to the new GMI is providing new CGM analyses and explanations to further
      understand how to interpret GMI and use it most effectively in clinical practice.
      This Perspective will address why a new name for eA1C was needed, why GMI was
      selected as the new name, how GMI is calculated, and how to understand and
      explain GMI if one chooses to use GMI as a tool in diabetes education or
      management.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Bergenstal, Richard M
AU  - Bergenstal RM
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-9050-5584
AD  - International Diabetes Center Park Nicollet, Minneapolis, MN
      richard.bergenstal@parknicollet.com.
FAU - Beck, Roy W
AU  - Beck RW
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-5194-8446
AD  - Jaeb Center for Health Research, Tampa, FL.
FAU - Close, Kelly L
AU  - Close KL
AD  - The diaTribe Foundation, San Francisco, CA.
FAU - Grunberger, George
AU  - Grunberger G
AD  - Grunberger Diabetes Institute, Bloomfield Hills, MI.
FAU - Sacks, David B
AU  - Sacks DB
AD  - National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.
FAU - Kowalski, Aaron
AU  - Kowalski A
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-0979-5343
AD  - JDRF, New York, NY.
FAU - Brown, Adam S
AU  - Brown AS
AD  - Close Concerns, San Francisco, CA.
FAU - Heinemann, Lutz
AU  - Heinemann L
AD  - Science Consulting in Diabetes, Neuss, Germany.
FAU - Aleppo, Grazia
AU  - Aleppo G
AD  - Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL.
FAU - Ryan, Donna B
AU  - Ryan DB
AD  - Sacred Heart and Providence Health Systems, Pensacola, FL.
FAU - Riddlesworth, Tonya D
AU  - Riddlesworth TD
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-4545-1668
AD  - Jaeb Center for Health Research, Tampa, FL.
FAU - Cefalu, William T
AU  - Cefalu WT
AD  - American Diabetes Association, Arlington, VA.
LA  - eng
GR  - UC4 DK108611/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20180917
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
RN  - 0 (Blood Glucose)
RN  - 0 (Glycated Hemoglobin A)
SB  - IM
MH  - Blood Glucose/*analysis/metabolism
MH  - Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring/classification/instrumentation/methods
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus/*blood
MH  - Glycated Hemoglobin A/*analysis
MH  - Health Education
MH  - *Health Status Indicators
MH  - Humans
MH  - Statistics as Topic/instrumentation/methods
MH  - *Terminology as Topic
PMC - PMC6196826
EDAT- 2018/09/19 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/06 06:00
CRDT- 2018/09/19 06:00
PMCR- 2019/11/01 00:00
PHST- 2018/07/24 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/08/24 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/11/01 00:00 [pmc-release]
PHST- 2018/09/19 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/06 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/09/19 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc18-1581 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1581 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2018 Nov;41(11):2275-2280. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1581. Epub 2018 Sep
      17.

PMID- 30217931
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190204
LR  - 20190215
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 41
IP  - 11
DP  - 2018 Nov
TI  - Association of Albuminuria With Intraglomerular Hydrostatic Pressure and Insulin 
      Resistance in Subjects With Impaired Fasting Glucose and/or Impaired Glucose
      Tolerance.
PG  - 2414-2420
LID - 10.2337/dc18-0718 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the relationships between insulin resistance,
      intrarenal hemodynamics, and urinary albumin excretion (UAE) in humans with
      impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The aim
      of the current study was to examine intrarenal hemodynamic abnormalities, insulin
      resistance, and UAE in subjects with IFG or IGT. We hypothesized that intrarenal 
      hemodynamic abnormalities would be associated with insulin resistance. RESEARCH
      DESIGN AND METHODS: Fifty-four kidney donors underwent 75-g oral glucose
      tolerance and inulin and para-aminohippuric acid clearance testing. Insulin
      sensitivity index (ISI) was evaluated by the Matsuda index. Intrarenal
      hemodynamic parameters were calculated by the Gomez formulae. RESULTS: Of the 54 
      subjects, 33 exhibited IFG or IGT and 31 exhibited normal glucose tolerance
      (NGT). Glomerular hydrostatic pressure (Pglo) and UAE were significantly higher
      in the IFG or IGT subjects with obesity (P = 0.015 and 0.0001, respectively). Log
      ISI correlated significantly and negatively with Pglo (r = -0.351, P = 0.009) in 
      all subjects. In multiple regression analyses among all subjects, log ISI was
      associated significantly and independently with Pglo (beta = -0.316, P = 0.015), 
      after adjustment for age, sex, and systolic blood pressure. Further, BMI (beta = 
      0.517, P = 0.0004), Pglo (beta = 0.420, P = 0.004), and log ISI (beta = -0.366, P
      = 0.008) were each associated significantly and independently with UAE after
      adjustment. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that increased insulin resistance is
      associated with increased Pglo and UAE in IFG or IGT subjects. These hemodynamic 
      burdens and insulin resistance may cause injury to the glomeruli even in subjects
      with IFG or IGT.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Tsuda, Akihiro
AU  - Tsuda A
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-2632-3591
AD  - Department of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Molecular Medicine, Osaka City
      University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan naranotsudadesu@infoseek.jp.
FAU - Ishimura, Eiji
AU  - Ishimura E
AD  - Department of Nephrology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine,
      Osaka, Japan.
FAU - Uedono, Hideki
AU  - Uedono H
AD  - Department of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Molecular Medicine, Osaka City
      University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
FAU - Ochi, Akinobu
AU  - Ochi A
AD  - Department of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Molecular Medicine, Osaka City
      University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
FAU - Nakatani, Shinya
AU  - Nakatani S
AD  - Department of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Molecular Medicine, Osaka City
      University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
FAU - Morioka, Tomoaki
AU  - Morioka T
AD  - Department of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Molecular Medicine, Osaka City
      University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
FAU - Mori, Katsuhito
AU  - Mori K
AD  - Department of Nephrology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine,
      Osaka, Japan.
FAU - Uchida, Junji
AU  - Uchida J
AD  - Department of Urology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, 
      Japan.
FAU - Emoto, Masanori
AU  - Emoto M
AD  - Department of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Molecular Medicine, Osaka City
      University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
FAU - Nakatani, Tatsuya
AU  - Nakatani T
AD  - Department of Urology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, 
      Japan.
FAU - Inaba, Masaaki
AU  - Inaba M
AD  - Department of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Molecular Medicine, Osaka City
      University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20180913
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
RN  - 0 (Blood Glucose)
RN  - 0 (Insulin)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Albuminuria/etiology/*metabolism/*physiopathology
MH  - Blood Glucose/metabolism
MH  - Blood Pressure
MH  - Fasting/blood
MH  - Female
MH  - Glomerular Filtration Rate
MH  - *Glucose Intolerance/complications/metabolism/physiopathology
MH  - Glucose Tolerance Test
MH  - Hemodynamics
MH  - Humans
MH  - Hydrostatic Pressure
MH  - Insulin/blood
MH  - Insulin Resistance/*physiology
MH  - Kidney/blood supply/*physiopathology
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Obesity/complications/metabolism/physiopathology
MH  - *Prediabetic State/complications/metabolism/physiopathology
EDAT- 2018/09/16 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/05 06:00
CRDT- 2018/09/16 06:00
PHST- 2018/04/11 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/08/06 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/09/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/05 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/09/16 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc18-0718 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-0718 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2018 Nov;41(11):2414-2420. doi: 10.2337/dc18-0718. Epub 2018 Sep
      13.

PMID- 30293772
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190213
LR  - 20190215
IS  - 1474-547X (Electronic)
IS  - 0140-6736 (Linking)
VI  - 392
IP  - 10161
DP  - 2018 Nov 24
TI  - Lorcaserin: balancing efficacy with potential risks.
PG  - 2239-2240
LID - S0140-6736(18)32460-7 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)32460-7 [doi]
FAU - Unamuno, Xabier
AU  - Unamuno X
AD  - Metabolic Research Laboratory, Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Clinica
      Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, IdiSNA, CIBEROBN, 31008 Pamplona, 
      Spain.
FAU - Fruhbeck, Gema
AU  - Fruhbeck G
AD  - Metabolic Research Laboratory, Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Clinica
      Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, IdiSNA, CIBEROBN, 31008 Pamplona, 
      Spain. Electronic address: gfruhbeck@unav.es.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT  - Comment
DEP - 20181004
PL  - England
TA  - Lancet
JT  - Lancet (London, England)
JID - 2985213R
RN  - 0 (Benzazepines)
RN  - 637E494O0Z (lorcaserin)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
CON - Lancet. 2018 Nov 24;392(10161):2269-2279. PMID: 30293771
MH  - Benzazepines
MH  - *Camellia
MH  - *Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
MH  - Humans
MH  - Obesity
MH  - Overweight
EDAT- 2018/10/09 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/14 06:00
CRDT- 2018/10/09 06:00
PHST- 2018/09/21 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/09/28 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/10/09 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/14 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/10/09 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0140-6736(18)32460-7 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)32460-7 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Lancet. 2018 Nov 24;392(10161):2239-2240. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)32460-7.
      Epub 2018 Oct 4.