PMID- 30522996
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190115
IS  - 1756-1833 (Electronic)
IS  - 0959-8138 (Linking)
VI  - 363
DP  - 2018 Dec 6
TI  - Incretins and cancer of the bile duct in type 2 diabetes.
PG  - k5155
LID - 10.1136/bmj.k5155 [doi]
FAU - Adler, Amanda I
AU  - Adler AI
AD  - Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK.
LA  - eng
PT  - Editorial
DEP - 20181206
PL  - England
TA  - BMJ
JT  - BMJ (Clinical research ed.)
JID - 8900488
COIS- Competing interests: I have read and understood the BMJ policy on declaration of 
      interests and declare the following: none.
EDAT- 2018/12/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/14 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/08 06:00
PHST- 2018/12/08 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1136/bmj.k5155 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - BMJ. 2018 Dec 6;363:k5155. doi: 10.1136/bmj.k5155.

PMID- 30537305
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181211
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Dec 7
TI  - Dietary protein affects both the dose and pattern of insulin delivery required to
      achieve postprandial euglycaemia in Type 1 diabetes: a randomized trial.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13875 [doi]
AB  - AIM: To quantify the insulin requirement for a high-protein meal compared with a 
      low-protein meal, controlling for carbohydrate and fat content. METHODS: In this 
      crossover study, young people with Type 1 diabetes were randomized to consume a
      high- (60 g) or low-protein meal (5 g), each containing 30 g carbohydrate and 8 g
      fat. A variation of the insulin clamp technique was used to determine the insulin
      requirements to maintain euglycaemia for the following 5 h. RESULTS: A total of
      11 participants (mean +/- sd age 16.5 +/- 2.7 years, HbA1c 52 +/- 8.7 mmol/mol
      [6.9 +/- 0.8%], diabetes duration 6.9+/-5.1 years) completed the study. The mean 
      insulin requirements for the high-protein meal were higher than for the
      low-protein meal [10.3 (CI 8.2, 12.57) vs 6.7 units (CI 4.7, 8.8); P=0.001], with
      inter-individual requirements ranging from 0.9 to six times the low-protein meal 
      requirement. Approximately half the additional insulin [1.1 units/h (CI 0.5, 1.8;
      P=0.001)] was given in the first 2 h, compared with an additional 0.5 units/h (CI
      -0.2, 1.2; P=0.148) in the second 2 h and 0.1 units (CI -0.6, 0.8; P=0.769) in
      the final hour. CONCLUSIONS: A high-protein meal requires ~50% more insulin to
      maintain euglycaemia than a low-protein meal that contains the same quantity of
      carbohydrate. The majority is required within the first 2 h. Inter-individual
      differences exist in insulin requirements for dietary protein. This article is
      protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
CI  - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
FAU - Evans, M
AU  - Evans M
AD  - Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, WA.
AD  - Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA.
FAU - Smart, C E M
AU  - Smart CEM
AD  - John Hunter Children's Hospital, Newcastle, NSW.
AD  - Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW.
FAU - Paramalingam, N
AU  - Paramalingam N
AD  - Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, WA.
AD  - Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA.
AD  - University of Western Australia, Perth, WA.
FAU - Smith, G
AU  - Smith G
AD  - Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA.
FAU - Jones, T W
AU  - Jones TW
AD  - Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, WA.
AD  - Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA.
AD  - University of Western Australia, Perth, WA.
FAU - King, B R
AU  - King BR
AD  - John Hunter Children's Hospital, Newcastle, NSW.
AD  - Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW.
AD  - University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
FAU - Davis, E A
AU  - Davis EA
AD  - Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, WA.
AD  - Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA.
AD  - University of Western Australia, Perth, WA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181207
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2018/12/12 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/12 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/12 06:00
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13875 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2018 Dec 7. doi: 10.1111/dme.13875.

PMID- 30537170
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181226
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Dec 7
TI  - Diabetic retinopathy in people with Type 2 diabetes and obesity treated by
      Roux-en-Y gastric bypass compared with non-operated controls: with focus on the
      role of diabetes remission in a cross-sectional and a 6-year follow-up study.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13876 [doi]
AB  - AIM: Whether or not Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and the derived metabolic
      improvements are beneficial to diabetic retinopathy is controversial. We aimed to
      determine the presence and development of retinopathy in individuals with obesity
      and Type 2 diabetes treated by RYGB compared with non-operated controls, and to
      determine the role of diabetes remission. METHODS: We graded fundus photography
      using the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy in 96 individuals
      with obesity and Type 2 diabetes treated by RYGB 6 years after surgery compared
      with 48 non-operated controls. In a subsample, we investigated the development of
      retinopathy over time. In the secondary analysis, we divided the RYGB group
      according to diabetes remission. RESULTS: RYGB surgery was not statistically
      associated with less retinopathy [relative risk (RR) 0.82, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.14], 
      when adjusted for diabetes duration, sex, age and BMI. During 5.9 years of
      follow-up, retinopathy grading in the RYGB group was unchanged, whereas the
      control group displayed worse grading by 0.69 steps (95% CI 0.18 to 1.19). The
      RYGB group with diabetes remission (52%) showed a trend towards less retinopathy 
      [adjusted RR (aRR) 0.45; 95% CI 0.19 to 1.06] than controls, and less retinopathy
      (aRR 0.33; 95% CI 0.11 to 0.94) than the RYGB group without remission in the
      cross-sectional data. CONCLUSIONS: In a cross-sectional setting, individuals with
      Type 2 diabetes treated by RYGB showed a tendency towards less retinopathy than
      non-operated controls, in particular diabetes remission following RYGB was
      associated with less retinopathy. Moreover after 5.9 years, retinopathy in the
      RYGB group had progressed less than in the control group. (Clinical Trial
      Registry No: NCT02625649).
CI  - (c) 2018 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Madsen, L R
AU  - Madsen LR
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8964-9564
AD  - Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus,
      Denmark.
AD  - Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
FAU - Bek, T
AU  - Bek T
AD  - Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
FAU - Richelsen, B
AU  - Richelsen B
AD  - Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus,
      Denmark.
AD  - Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
LA  - eng
SI  - ClinicalTrials.gov/NCT02625649
GR  - NNF160C0020870/Novo Nordisk Foundation
GR  - A294/Health Research Fund of Central Denmark Region
GR  - 15-253/A.P. Moller Foundation
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181207
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2018/12/12 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/12 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/12 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/29 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13876 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2018 Dec 7. doi: 10.1111/dme.13876.

PMID- 30536728
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181211
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Dec 7
TI  - Physical exercise and non-insulin glucose-lowering therapies in the management of
      Type 2 diabetes mellitus: a clinical review.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13865 [doi]
AB  - In the UK the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) advocates
      intensive lifestyle programmes that attain the levels of daily physical activity 
      set out by the Chief Medical Officer as a first-line strategy for improving the
      health of people at risk of developing diabetes or reducing the risk of
      development of Type 2 diabetes. For people with Type 2 diabetes, lifestyle
      measures complement pharmacological treatments that include both oral and
      injectable therapies. In line with this, NICE guidelines also support
      intensification of efforts to improve patient lifestyle along with these
      glucose-lowering therapies. There is a paucity of evidence, however, in the
      available published literature examining the association between glucose-lowering
      therapies and exercise metabolism. In the present review we explore the current
      knowledge with regard to the potential interactions of oral and non-insulin
      injectable therapies with physical activity in people at risk of, or who have,
      Type 2 diabetes, and present evidence that may inform healthcare professionals of
      the need to monitor patients more closely in their adaptation to both
      pharmacological therapy and physical activity.
CI  - (c) 2018 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Eckstein, M L
AU  - Eckstein ML
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0320-8408
AD  - Diabetes Research Group, Swansea University, Medical School, Swansea, UK.
AD  - Applied Sport, Technology, Exercise and Medicine Research Centre (A-STEM),
      College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea, UK.
FAU - Williams, D M
AU  - Williams DM
AD  - Diabetes Research Group, Swansea University, Medical School, Swansea, UK.
AD  - Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Morriston Hospital, Swansea, UK.
FAU - O'Neil, L K
AU  - O'Neil LK
AD  - Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Morriston Hospital, Swansea, UK.
FAU - Hayes, J
AU  - Hayes J
AD  - Diabetes Research Group, Swansea University, Medical School, Swansea, UK.
AD  - Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Morriston Hospital, Swansea, UK.
FAU - Stephens, J W
AU  - Stephens JW
AD  - Diabetes Research Group, Swansea University, Medical School, Swansea, UK.
AD  - Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Morriston Hospital, Swansea, UK.
FAU - Bracken, R M
AU  - Bracken RM
AD  - Diabetes Research Group, Swansea University, Medical School, Swansea, UK.
AD  - Applied Sport, Technology, Exercise and Medicine Research Centre (A-STEM),
      College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea, UK.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
DEP - 20181207
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2018/12/12 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/12 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/12 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/19 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13865 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2018 Dec 7. doi: 10.1111/dme.13865.

PMID- 30523028
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181207
IS  - 1939-327X (Electronic)
IS  - 0012-1797 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Dec 6
TI  - Identification of Specific MicroRNAs in Neutrophils of type 2 Diabetic Mice:
      Overexpression of microRNA-129-2-3p Accelerates Diabetic Wound Healing.
LID - db180313 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/db18-0313 [doi]
AB  - Neutrophils are involved in the first stage of acute inflammation. Following
      injury, they are mobilized and recruited to the injured tissue. In diabetes,
      wound healing is delayed and aberrant, leading to excessive recruitment and
      retention of neutrophils that fail to promote angiogenesis and prolong
      inflammation. However, the exact pathological mechanisms of diabetic-derived
      neutrophils in chronic inflammation remain unclear. Here, microRNA (miRNA)
      profiling of neutrophils from bone marrow in type 2 diabetic mice was performed
      using a microarray. miRNAs regulate the post-transcriptional expression of target
      mRNAs and are important in countering inflammation-related diseases. Our study
      revealed that miRNAs exhibited differential expression in diabetic-derived
      neutrophils compared with non-diabetic-derived neutrophils, especially miR-129
      family members. miR-129-2-3p directly regulated the translation of Casp6 and
      Ccr2, which are involved in inflammatory responses and apoptosis. Furthermore,
      miR-129-2-3p overexpression at the wound site of type 2 diabetic mice accelerated
      wound healing. These results suggest possible involvement of miR-129-2-3p in
      diabetic-derived neutrophil dysfunction and that retention kinetics of
      neutrophils and chronic inflammation may be initiated via miR-129-2-3p-regulated 
      genes. This study characterized changes in global miRNA expression in
      diabetic-derived neutrophils and systematically identified critical target genes 
      involved in certain biological processes related to the pathology of diabetic
      wound healing.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Umehara, Takahiro
AU  - Umehara T
AD  - Division of Forensic Pathology and Science, Unit of Social Medicine, Course of
      Medical and Dental Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki
      University School of Medicine, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523, Japan
      umehara@nagasaki-u.ac.jp.
FAU - Mori, Ryoichi
AU  - Mori R
AD  - Department of Pathology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine and Graduate
      School of Biomedical Sciences, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523, Japan.
FAU - Mace, Kimberly A
AU  - Mace KA
AD  - Division of Cell Matrix Biology and Regenerative Medicine, School of Biological
      Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester,
      Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, United Kingdom.
FAU - Murase, Takehiko
AU  - Murase T
AD  - Division of Forensic Pathology and Science, Unit of Social Medicine, Course of
      Medical and Dental Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki
      University School of Medicine, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523, Japan.
FAU - Abe, Yuki
AU  - Abe Y
AD  - Division of Forensic Pathology and Science, Unit of Social Medicine, Course of
      Medical and Dental Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki
      University School of Medicine, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523, Japan.
FAU - Yamamoto, Takuma
AU  - Yamamoto T
AD  - Division of Forensic Pathology and Science, Unit of Social Medicine, Course of
      Medical and Dental Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki
      University School of Medicine, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523, Japan.
FAU - Ikematsu, Kazuya
AU  - Ikematsu K
AD  - Division of Forensic Pathology and Science, Unit of Social Medicine, Course of
      Medical and Dental Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki
      University School of Medicine, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523, Japan.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181206
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes
JT  - Diabetes
JID - 0372763
EDAT- 2018/12/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/14 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/08 06:00
PHST- 2018/03/16 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/11/28 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/12/08 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [medline]
AID - db18-0313 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/db18-0313 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes. 2018 Dec 6. pii: db18-0313. doi: 10.2337/db18-0313.

PMID- 30523027
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181207
IS  - 1939-327X (Electronic)
IS  - 0012-1797 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Dec 6
TI  - Multimodal Imaging of the Initial Stages of Diabetic Retinopathy. Different
      Disease Pathways in Different Patients.
LID - db181077 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/db18-1077 [doi]
AB  - To evaluate the prevalence of different disease pathways (ischemia,
      neurodegeneration and edema) in the initial stages of diabetic retinopathy
      (DR).In this retrospective cross-sectional study, eyes were grouped by DR
      severity using the 7-field ETDRS protocol (levels 10-20, 35 and 43-47).
      Neurodegeneration was identified by thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer
      (RNFL) and/or ganglion cell layer (GCL). Edema was identified by thickening of
      the inner nuclear layer (INL), outer plexiform layer (OPL), or full retina.
      Ischemia was identified by metrics of retinal vessel density.142 eyes from 142
      patients (28% women) aged 52-88 years were imaged. Vessel density (ischemia) was 
      significantly different between ETDRS groups (p<0.020). On multivariate
      regression analysis, it remained significantly different between stages of the
      disease and showed associations with age (p<0.001), gender (p=0.028) and
      metabolic control (p=0.034). No significant differences between ETDRS groups were
      found in retinal thinning (neurodegeneration) or retinal thickness (edema). Eyes 
      with the same ETDRS retinopathy grading from different diabetic patients show
      that the prevalence of different disease pathways, varies between patients even
      within the same severity group.Ischemia (capillary dropout) is the only disease
      pathway that shows correlation with retinopathy severity and metabolic control.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Marques, Ines P
AU  - Marques IP
AD  - AIBILI - Association for Innovation and Biomedical Research on Light and Image,
      Coimbra, Portugal.
FAU - Alves, Dalila
AU  - Alves D
AD  - AIBILI - Association for Innovation and Biomedical Research on Light and Image,
      Coimbra, Portugal.
FAU - Santos, Torcato
AU  - Santos T
AD  - AIBILI - Association for Innovation and Biomedical Research on Light and Image,
      Coimbra, Portugal.
FAU - Mendes, Luis
AU  - Mendes L
AD  - AIBILI - Association for Innovation and Biomedical Research on Light and Image,
      Coimbra, Portugal.
FAU - Santos, Ana Rita
AU  - Santos AR
AD  - AIBILI - Association for Innovation and Biomedical Research on Light and Image,
      Coimbra, Portugal.
FAU - Lobo, Conceicao
AU  - Lobo C
AD  - AIBILI - Association for Innovation and Biomedical Research on Light and Image,
      Coimbra, Portugal.
AD  - University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
FAU - Durbin, Mary
AU  - Durbin M
AD  - Advanced Development, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, CA.
FAU - Cunha-Vaz, Jose
AU  - Cunha-Vaz J
AD  - AIBILI - Association for Innovation and Biomedical Research on Light and Image,
      Coimbra, Portugal cunhavaz@aibili.pt.
AD  - University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181206
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes
JT  - Diabetes
JID - 0372763
EDAT- 2018/12/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/14 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/08 06:00
PHST- 2018/10/08 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/11/26 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/12/08 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [medline]
AID - db18-1077 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/db18-1077 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes. 2018 Dec 6. pii: db18-1077. doi: 10.2337/db18-1077.

PMID- 30523026
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181207
IS  - 1939-327X (Electronic)
IS  - 0012-1797 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Dec 6
TI  - FoxO Transcription Factors are Critical Regulators of Diabetes-Related Muscle
      Atrophy.
LID - db180416 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/db18-0416 [doi]
AB  - Insulin deficiency and uncontrolled diabetes lead to a catabolic state with
      decreased muscle strength, contributing to disease-related morbidity. FoxO
      transcription factors are suppressed by insulin and thus are key mediators of
      insulin action. To study their role in diabetic muscle wasting, we created mice
      with muscle-specific triple knockout of FoxO1/3/4 and induced diabetes in these
      M-FoxO-TKO mice with streptozotocin (STZ). Muscle mass and myofiber area were
      decreased 20-30% in STZ-Diabetes mice due to increased ubiquitin-proteasome
      degradation and autophagy alterations, characterized by increased LC3 containing 
      vesicles, and elevated levels of p-ULK1 and LC3-II. Both the muscle loss and
      markers of increased degradation/autophagy were completely prevented in
      STZ-FoxO-TKO mice. Transcriptomic analyses revealed FoxO-dependent increases in
      ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathways in STZ-Diabetes, including regulation of 
      Fbxo32 (Atrogin1), Trim63 (MuRF1), Bnip3L, and Gabarapl. These same genes were
      increased 1.4- to 3.3-fold in muscle from type 1 diabetics after short-term
      insulin deprivation. Thus, FoxO-regulated genes play a rate-limiting role in
      increased protein degradation and muscle atrophy in insulin-deficient diabetes.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - O'Neill, Brian T
AU  - O'Neill BT
AD  - Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center and Division of Endocrinology 
      and Metabolism, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of
      Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.
AD  - Section on Integrative Physiology and Metabolism, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard
      Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
FAU - Bhardwaj, Gourav
AU  - Bhardwaj G
AD  - Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center and Division of Endocrinology 
      and Metabolism, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of
      Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.
FAU - Penniman, Christie M
AU  - Penniman CM
AD  - Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center and Division of Endocrinology 
      and Metabolism, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of
      Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.
FAU - Krumpoch, Megan T
AU  - Krumpoch MT
AD  - Section on Integrative Physiology and Metabolism, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard
      Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
FAU - Suarez Beltran, Pablo A
AU  - Suarez Beltran PA
AD  - Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center and Division of Endocrinology 
      and Metabolism, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of
      Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.
FAU - Klaus, Katherine
AU  - Klaus K
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200
      First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.
FAU - Poro, Kennedy
AU  - Poro K
AD  - Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center and Division of Endocrinology 
      and Metabolism, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of
      Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.
FAU - Li, Mengyao
AU  - Li M
AD  - Section on Integrative Physiology and Metabolism, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard
      Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
FAU - Pan, Hui
AU  - Pan H
AD  - Bioinformatics Core, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
      02215, USA.
AD  - Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
FAU - Dreyfuss, Jonathan M
AU  - Dreyfuss JM
AD  - Bioinformatics Core, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
      02215, USA.
AD  - Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
FAU - Nair, K Sreekumaran
AU  - Nair KS
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200
      First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.
FAU - Kahn, C Ronald
AU  - Kahn CR
AD  - Section on Integrative Physiology and Metabolism, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard
      Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA C.Ronald.Kahn@joslin.harvard.edu.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181206
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes
JT  - Diabetes
JID - 0372763
EDAT- 2018/12/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/14 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/08 06:00
PHST- 2018/04/11 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/10/20 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/12/08 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [medline]
AID - db18-0416 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/db18-0416 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes. 2018 Dec 6. pii: db18-0416. doi: 10.2337/db18-0416.

PMID- 30523024
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190108
IS  - 1939-327X (Electronic)
IS  - 0012-1797 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Dec 6
TI  - Peripheral Mechanisms Mediating the Sustained Anti-Diabetic Action of FGF1 in the
      Brain.
LID - db180498 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/db18-0498 [doi]
AB  - We recently reported that in rodent models of type 2 diabetes (T2D), a single
      intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1)
      induces remission of hyperglycemia that is sustained for weeks. To clarify the
      peripheral mechanisms underlying this effect, we employed the Zucker diabetic
      fatty fa/fa rat model of T2D, which, like human T2D, is characterized by
      progressive deterioration of pancreatic beta-cell function after hyperglycemia
      onset. We report that while icv injection of FGF1 delays the onset of beta-cell
      dysfunction in these animals, it has no effect on either glucose-induced insulin 
      secretion or insulin sensitivity. These observations suggest that FGF1 acts in
      the brain to stimulate insulin-independent glucose clearance. Based on our
      finding that icv FGF1 treatment increases hepatic glucokinase gene expression, we
      considered the possibility that increased hepatic glucose uptake (HGU)
      contributes to the insulin-independent glucose-lowering effect of icv FGF1.
      Consistent with this possibility, we report that icv FGF1 injection increases
      liver glucokinase activity by a approximately 2-fold. We conclude that sustained 
      remission of hyperglycemia induced by the central action of FGF1 involves both
      preservation of beta-cell function and stimulation of HGU via increased hepatic
      glucokinase activity.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Scarlett, Jarrad M
AU  - Scarlett JM
AD  - University of Washington Medicine Diabetes Institute, Department of Medicine,
      University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
AD  - Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of
      Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Muta, Kenjiro
AU  - Muta K
AD  - University of Washington Medicine Diabetes Institute, Department of Medicine,
      University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Brown, Jenny M
AU  - Brown JM
AD  - University of Washington Medicine Diabetes Institute, Department of Medicine,
      University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Rojas, Jennifer M
AU  - Rojas JM
AD  - University of Washington Medicine Diabetes Institute, Department of Medicine,
      University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
AD  - Department of Physiology, Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism,
      Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA.
FAU - Matsen, Miles E
AU  - Matsen ME
AD  - University of Washington Medicine Diabetes Institute, Department of Medicine,
      University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Acharya, Nikhil K
AU  - Acharya NK
AD  - University of Washington Medicine Diabetes Institute, Department of Medicine,
      University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Secher, Anna
AU  - Secher A
AD  - Novo Nordisk A/S, Malov, Denmark.
FAU - Ingvorsen, Camilla
AU  - Ingvorsen C
AD  - Novo Nordisk A/S, Malov, Denmark.
FAU - Jorgensen, Rasmus
AU  - Jorgensen R
AD  - Novo Nordisk A/S, Malov, Denmark.
FAU - Hoeg-Jensen, Thomas
AU  - Hoeg-Jensen T
AD  - Novo Nordisk A/S, Malov, Denmark.
FAU - Stefanovski, Darko
AU  - Stefanovski D
AD  - New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania,
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
FAU - Bergman, Richard N
AU  - Bergman RN
AD  - Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los
      Angeles, California, USA.
FAU - Piccinini, Francesca
AU  - Piccinini F
AD  - Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los
      Angeles, California, USA.
FAU - Kaiyala, Karl J
AU  - Kaiyala KJ
AD  - Department of Dental Public Health Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of
      Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Shiota, Masakazu
AU  - Shiota M
AD  - Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University School
      of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.
FAU - Morton, Gregory J
AU  - Morton GJ
AD  - University of Washington Medicine Diabetes Institute, Department of Medicine,
      University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
FAU - Schwartz, Michael W
AU  - Schwartz MW
AD  - University of Washington Medicine Diabetes Institute, Department of Medicine,
      University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA mschwart@u.washington.edu.
LA  - eng
GR  - R01 DK089056/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181206
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes
JT  - Diabetes
JID - 0372763
EDAT- 2018/12/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/14 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/08 06:00
PHST- 2018/05/03 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/10/29 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/12/08 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [medline]
AID - db18-0498 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/db18-0498 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes. 2018 Dec 6. pii: db18-0498. doi: 10.2337/db18-0498.

PMID- 30523035
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181207
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Dec 6
TI  - Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Routine Screening Using Massively Parallel
      Sequencing for Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young in a Pediatric Diabetes
      Cohort: Reduced Health System Costs and Improved Patient Quality of Life.
LID - dc180261 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-0261 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is an autosomal dominant
      form of diabetes, with multiple causative genes. Some MODY subtypes can be
      treated with sulfonylureas instead of insulin, improving glycemic control,
      complication rates, quality of life (QoL), and costs. Using massively parallel
      sequencing (MPS), we recently determined the prevalence of pathogenic/likely
      pathogenic MODY variants in an Australian pediatric diabetes cohort. Here, these 
      data are used to estimate cost-effectiveness of using MPS for MODY in all
      pediatric diabetes cases compared with standard practice (sequencing limited to
      individuals with specific clinical features). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A
      Markov decision model was developed to estimate incremental costs and
      quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) of MPS screening, modeled over 30 years. We
      used our observed prevalence of 2.14% compared with 0.7% for standard practice,
      based on published data. The probabilities and utility weightings of long-term
      diabetes complications were based on HbA1c and estimated from published data. A
      series of one-way sensitivity analyses were performed using the net monetary
      benefit framework. RESULTS: Routine MPS screening for MODY was more effective and
      less costly than standard care screening, with 26 QALYs gained and 1,016,000 AUD 
      (782,000 USD) saved per 1,000 patients. Cost of screening was fully offset within
      10 years. Routine MPS screening remained dominant until MODY prevalence fell to
      <1.1%. CONCLUSIONS: Routine MPS screening for MODY in the pediatric population
      with diabetes could reduce health system costs and improve patient QoL. Our
      results make a compelling argument for routine genetic screening in all children 
      with presumed type 1 diabetes mellitus.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Johnson, Stephanie R
AU  - Johnson SR
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4540-2751
AD  - Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, South
      Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
AD  - Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Faculty of Health, Queensland
      University of Technology, Translational Research Institute, Woolloongabba,
      Queensland, Australia.
AD  - University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, 
      Woolloongabba, Queensland, Australia.
AD  - Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
FAU - Carter, Hannah E
AU  - Carter HE
AD  - Australian Centre for Health Services Innovation, Institute of Health and
      Biomedical Innovation, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology,
      Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
FAU - Leo, Paul
AU  - Leo P
AD  - Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Faculty of Health, Queensland
      University of Technology, Translational Research Institute, Woolloongabba,
      Queensland, Australia.
FAU - Hollingworth, Samantha A
AU  - Hollingworth SA
AD  - School of Pharmacy, University of Queensland, Woolloongabba, Queensland,
      Australia.
FAU - Davis, Elizabeth A
AU  - Davis EA
AD  - Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Perth Children's Hospital, Perth,
      Western Australia, Australia.
AD  - Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western
      Australia, Australia.
AD  - School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth,
      Western Australia, Australia.
FAU - Jones, Timothy W
AU  - Jones TW
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7989-1998
AD  - Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Perth Children's Hospital, Perth,
      Western Australia, Australia.
AD  - Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western
      Australia, Australia.
AD  - School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth,
      Western Australia, Australia.
FAU - Conwell, Louise S
AU  - Conwell LS
AD  - Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, South
      Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
AD  - Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
FAU - Harris, Mark
AU  - Harris M
AD  - Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, South
      Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
AD  - University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, 
      Woolloongabba, Queensland, Australia.
AD  - Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
FAU - Brown, Matthew A
AU  - Brown MA
AD  - Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Faculty of Health, Queensland
      University of Technology, Translational Research Institute, Woolloongabba,
      Queensland, Australia.
FAU - Graves, Nicholas
AU  - Graves N
AD  - Australian Centre for Health Services Innovation, Institute of Health and
      Biomedical Innovation, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology,
      Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
FAU - Duncan, Emma L
AU  - Duncan EL
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8143-4403
AD  - Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Faculty of Health, Queensland
      University of Technology, Translational Research Institute, Woolloongabba,
      Queensland, Australia emma.duncan@qut.edu.au.
AD  - Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
AD  - Department of Endocrinology, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Herston,
      Queensland, Australia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181206
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2018/12/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/14 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/08 06:00
PHST- 2018/02/03 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/10/12 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/12/08 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-0261 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-0261 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2018 Dec 6. pii: dc18-0261. doi: 10.2337/dc18-0261.

PMID- 30523034
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181207
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Dec 6
TI  - Incidence and Determinants of Intraocular Lens Implantation in Type 2 Diabetes:
      The Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II.
LID - dc181556 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1556 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: To compare the incidence of intraocular lens (IOL) implantation for
      cataracts between people with and without type 2 diabetes and to determine
      associated risk factors in those with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND
      METHODS: Participants with type 2 diabetes (n = 1,499) from the community-based
      observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase II (FDS2) were age, sex, and zip
      code matched 1:4 with residents without diabetes. IOL implantation status was
      ascertained between entry (2008-2011) and the end of 2016 using validated data
      linkage. Age-specific incidence rates and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for
      cataract surgery were calculated. Predictors of IOL implantation in FDS2
      participants were assessed using proportional hazards and competing risk
      regression modeling. RESULTS: The crude IRR (95% CI) for cataract surgery in FDS2
      participants (mean +/- SD age 62.8 +/- 10.8 years at entry) versus the matched
      group without diabetes was 1.50 (1.32-1.71), with the highest relative risk in
      those aged 45-54 years at the time of surgery (7.12 [2.05-27.66]). Competing risk
      analysis showed that age at entry, diabetes duration, serum HDL cholesterol,
      serum triglycerides, a severe hypoglycemic episode in the past year, and Asian
      and southern European ethnicity increased the risk of cataract surgery in
      participants with type 2 diabetes (P </= 0.025). CONCLUSIONS: People with type 2 
      diabetes, especially those in younger age-groups, are at a significantly
      increased risk of cataract surgery than matched people without diabetes.
      Multifaceted prevention strategies should be incorporated as part of routine
      care. As well as limiting ultraviolet light exposure, these might include
      lipid-modifying treatment and strategies to avoid severe hypoglycemia.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Drinkwater, Jocelyn J
AU  - Drinkwater JJ
AD  - Medical School, University of Western Australia, Fremantle Hospital, Fremantle,
      Western Australia, Australia.
FAU - Davis, Timothy M E
AU  - Davis TME
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0749-7411
AD  - Medical School, University of Western Australia, Fremantle Hospital, Fremantle,
      Western Australia, Australia tim.davis@uwa.edu.au.
FAU - Turner, Angus W
AU  - Turner AW
AD  - Lions Eye Institute, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.
AD  - Centre for Ophthalmology and Visual Science, University of Western Australia,
      Crawley, Western Australia, Australia.
FAU - Bruce, David G
AU  - Bruce DG
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9979-6867
AD  - Medical School, University of Western Australia, Fremantle Hospital, Fremantle,
      Western Australia, Australia.
FAU - Davis, Wendy A
AU  - Davis WA
AD  - Medical School, University of Western Australia, Fremantle Hospital, Fremantle,
      Western Australia, Australia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181206
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2018/12/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/14 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/08 06:00
PHST- 2018/07/19 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/11/14 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/12/08 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-1556 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1556 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2018 Dec 6. pii: dc18-1556. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1556.

PMID- 30523033
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181207
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Dec 6
TI  - Retinopathy and RAAS Activation: Results From the Canadian Study of Longevity in 
      Type 1 Diabetes.
LID - dc181809 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1809 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: The importance of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS)
      activation in retinopathy for long-standing diabetes is not well understood. We
      determined retinopathy stage and evaluated associations with other vascular
      complications before and after physiological RAAS activation in adults with
      long-standing (>/=50 years duration) type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND
      METHODS: Participants underwent retinal examination by digital funduscopic
      photography and optical coherence tomography and were classified as having
      nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR), proliferative diabetic retinopathy 
      (PDR), or no diabetic retinopathy (NDR) with or without diabetic macular edema
      (DME). Neuropathy was measured by clinical neuropathy examination scores,
      electrophysiologically, and by corneal confocal microscopy. Renal function was
      measured by inulin and para-aminohippurate clearance methods. Arterial stiffness 
      was measured by applanation tonometry. Renal function, blood pressure, and
      arterial stiffness were measured before and after RAAS activation with
      angiotensin II (ANGII). Associations were determined using linear regression.
      RESULTS: Twelve (16%) of the 75 participants had NDR, 39 (52%) had NPDR, and 24
      (32%) had PDR. A low overall prevalence of DME (4%) was observed. Those with PDR 
      had worse nerve function and reduced corneal nerve density, were more likely to
      have macrovascular disease, and had increased arterial stiffness in response to
      ANGII compared with those with NPDR or NDR. Prevalence of kidney disease or renal
      hemodynamic function did not differ by retinopathy status. CONCLUSIONS: PDR was
      associated with neuropathy severity and cardiovascular and peripheral vascular
      disease. In those with PDR, RAAS activation may be linked to vascular stiffening,
      an effect that persists in long-standing type 1 diabetes.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Lovshin, Julie A
AU  - Lovshin JA
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9171-8952
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre,
      Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
      julie.lovshin@sunnybrook.ca.
FAU - Lytvyn, Yuliya
AU  - Lytvyn Y
AD  - Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto,
      Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Lovblom, Leif E
AU  - Lovblom LE
AD  - Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario,
      Canada.
FAU - Katz, Alexandra
AU  - Katz A
AD  - Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto,
      Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Boulet, Genevieve
AU  - Boulet G
AD  - Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario,
      Canada.
FAU - Bjornstad, Petter
AU  - Bjornstad P
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5160-2947
AD  - Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, and Division of Nephrology, 
      Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO.
FAU - Lai, Vesta
AU  - Lai V
AD  - Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto,
      Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Cham, Leslie
AU  - Cham L
AD  - Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto,
      Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Tse, Josephine
AU  - Tse J
AD  - Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto,
      Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Orszag, Andrej
AU  - Orszag A
AD  - Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario,
      Canada.
FAU - Keenan, Hillary A
AU  - Keenan HA
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4172-5537
AD  - Research Division, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA.
FAU - Paul, Narinder
AU  - Paul N
AD  - Department of Medical Imaging, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western
      University, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Bril, Vera
AU  - Bril V
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5805-4883
AD  - Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, University Health Network,
      University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Wong, David T
AU  - Wong DT
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University 
      of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - McReelis, Kylen D
AU  - McReelis KD
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University 
      of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Brent, Michael H
AU  - Brent MH
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University 
      of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Perkins, Bruce A
AU  - Perkins BA
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5885-0046
AD  - Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario,
      Canada.
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai
      Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Cherney, David Z I
AU  - Cherney DZI
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4164-0429
AD  - Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto,
      Ontario, Canada.
AD  - Department of Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181206
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2018/12/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/14 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/08 06:00
PHST- 2018/08/27 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/10/25 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/12/08 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-1809 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1809 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2018 Dec 6. pii: dc18-1809. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1809.

PMID- 30523030
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181207
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Dec 6
TI  - Participating in Mental, Social, and Physical Leisure Activities and Having a
      Rich Social Network Reduce the Incidence of Diabetes-Related Dementia in a Cohort
      of Swedish Older Adults.
LID - dc181428 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1428 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: The effect of a healthy lifestyle on diabetes-related dementia remains
      unknown. We examined whether an active lifestyle and rich social network may
      counteract the increased risk of dementia in people with diabetes. RESEARCH
      DESIGN AND METHODS: Dementia-free older adults from the Swedish National Study on
      Aging and Care in Kungsholmen (n = 2,650) were followed up for 10 years. Diabetes
      was ascertained on the basis of medical history, medication use, medical records,
      or glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) >/=6.5% and prediabetes as HbA1c between 5.7 and
      6.5%. Dementia was diagnosed by specialists following standard criteria. An
      active lifestyle was defined as a moderate to high (vs. low) level of engagement 
      in leisure activities or a rich social network (having moderate to rich [vs.
      poor] social connections and support). Hazard ratios (HRs) of dementia risk were 
      derived from Cox regression models. RESULTS: There were 246 incident dementia
      cases during follow-up. Those with diabetes (n = 243), but not those with
      prediabetes (n = 921), had greater risk of dementia (adjusted HR 2.0 [95% CI
      1.4-2.9]) than diabetes-free participants. Participants with diabetes but low
      level of engagement in leisure activities (HR 4.2 [95% CI 2.2-8.2]) or a poor
      social network (HR 3.4 [95% CI 1.9-6.1]) had greater dementia risk than
      diabetes-free participants with moderate to high levels of leisure activity
      engagement or a moderate to rich social network. In participants with diabetes,
      an active lifestyle (high level of engagement in leisure activities or a rich
      social network) was associated with less of a raised risk (HR 1.9 [95% CI
      1.1-3.4]). CONCLUSIONS: An active and socially integrated lifestyle may
      significantly counteract the detrimental effect of diabetes on dementia risk.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Marseglia, Anna
AU  - Marseglia A
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9672-6978
AD  - Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society,
      Karolinska Institutet, and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
      anna.marseglia@ki.se xuweili@tmu.edu.cn weili.xu@ki.se.
FAU - Wang, Hui-Xin
AU  - Wang HX
AD  - Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society,
      Karolinska Institutet, and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
AD  - Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
FAU - Rizzuto, Debora
AU  - Rizzuto D
AD  - Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society,
      Karolinska Institutet, and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
FAU - Fratiglioni, Laura
AU  - Fratiglioni L
AD  - Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society,
      Karolinska Institutet, and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
AD  - Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Stockholm, Sweden.
FAU - Xu, Weili
AU  - Xu W
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6140-2968
AD  - Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society,
      Karolinska Institutet, and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
      anna.marseglia@ki.se xuweili@tmu.edu.cn weili.xu@ki.se.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tianjin
      Medical University, Tianjin, China.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181206
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2018/12/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/14 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/08 06:00
PHST- 2018/07/04 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/10/30 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/12/08 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/14 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-1428 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1428 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2018 Dec 6. pii: dc18-1428. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1428.

PMID- 30530850
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181211
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Dec 10
TI  - Proinsulin Secretion Is a Persistent Feature of Type 1 Diabetes.
LID - dc172625 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc17-2625 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Abnormally elevated proinsulin secretion has been reported in type 2
      and early type 1 diabetes when significant C-peptide is present. We questioned
      whether individuals with longstanding type 1 diabetes and low or absent C-peptide
      secretory capacity retained the ability to make proinsulin. RESEARCH DESIGN AND
      METHODS: C-peptide and proinsulin were measured in fasting and stimulated sera
      from 319 subjects with long-standing type 1 diabetes (>/=3 years) and 12 control 
      subjects without diabetes. We considered three categories of stimulated
      C-peptide: 1) C-peptide positive, with high stimulated values >/=0.2 nmol/L; 2)
      C-peptide positive, with low stimulated values >/=0.017 but <0.2 nmol/L; and 3)
      C-peptide <0.017 nmol/L. Longitudinal samples were analyzed from
      C-peptide-positive subjects with diabetes after 1, 2, and 4 years. RESULTS: Of
      individuals with long-standing type 1 diabetes, 95.9% had detectable serum
      proinsulin (>3.1 pmol/L), while 89.9% of participants with stimulated C-peptide
      values below the limit of detection (<0.017 nmol/L; n = 99) had measurable
      proinsulin. Proinsulin levels remained stable over 4 years of follow-up, while
      C-peptide decreased slowly during longitudinal analysis. Correlations between
      proinsulin with C-peptide and mixed-meal stimulation of proinsulin were found
      only in subjects with high stimulated C-peptide values (>/=0.2 nmol/L).
      Specifically, increases in proinsulin with mixed-meal stimulation were present
      only in the group with high stimulated C-peptide values, with no increases
      observed among subjects with low or undetectable (<0.017 nmol/L) residual
      C-peptide. CONCLUSIONS: In individuals with long-duration type 1 diabetes, the
      ability to secrete proinsulin persists, even in those with undetectable serum
      C-peptide.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Sims, Emily K
AU  - Sims EK
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4393-954X
FAU - Bahnson, Henry T
AU  - Bahnson HT
FAU - Nyalwidhe, Julius
AU  - Nyalwidhe J
FAU - Haataja, Leena
AU  - Haataja L
FAU - Davis, Asa K
AU  - Davis AK
FAU - Speake, Cate
AU  - Speake C
FAU - DiMeglio, Linda A
AU  - DiMeglio LA
FAU - Blum, Janice
AU  - Blum J
FAU - Morris, Margaret A
AU  - Morris MA
FAU - Mirmira, Raghavendra G
AU  - Mirmira RG
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5013-6075
FAU - Nadler, Jerry
AU  - Nadler J
FAU - Mastracci, Teresa L
AU  - Mastracci TL
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1956-1951
FAU - Marcovina, Santica
AU  - Marcovina S
FAU - Qian, Wei-Jun
AU  - Qian WJ
FAU - Yi, Lian
AU  - Yi L
FAU - Swensen, Adam C
AU  - Swensen AC
FAU - Yip-Schneider, Michele
AU  - Yip-Schneider M
FAU - Schmidt, C Max
AU  - Schmidt CM
FAU - Considine, Robert V
AU  - Considine RV
FAU - Arvan, Peter
AU  - Arvan P
FAU - Greenbaum, Carla J
AU  - Greenbaum CJ
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4451-9800
FAU - Evans-Molina, Carmella
AU  - Evans-Molina C
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7764-8663
CN  - T1D Exchange Residual C-peptide Study Group
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181210
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
IR  - Willi S
FIR - Willi, Steven
IR  - Calvano T
FIR - Calvano, Tammy
IR  - Klingensmith G
FIR - Klingensmith, Georgeanna
IR  - Haro H
FIR - Haro, Heidi
IR  - Weinstock R
FIR - Weinstock, Ruth
IR  - Bzdick S
FIR - Bzdick, Suzan
IR  - Goland R
FIR - Goland, Robin
IR  - Greenberg E
FIR - Greenberg, Ellen
IR  - Lee J
FIR - Lee, Joyce
IR  - Eason A
FIR - Eason, Ashley
IR  - DiMeglio L
FIR - DiMeglio, Linda
IR  - Woerner S
FIR - Woerner, Stephanie
IR  - Ahmann A
FIR - Ahmann, Andrew
IR  - Fitch R
FIR - Fitch, Rebecca
IR  - Bethin K
FIR - Bethin, Kathleen
IR  - Ecker M
FIR - Ecker, Michelle
IR  - Hirsch I
FIR - Hirsch, Irl
IR  - Peterson C
FIR - Peterson, Christina
IR  - Liljenquist D
FIR - Liljenquist, David
IR  - Robison B
FIR - Robison, Brandon
IR  - Bergenstal R
FIR - Bergenstal, Richard
IR  - Olson B
FIR - Olson, Beth
IR  - Cengiz E
FIR - Cengiz, Eda
IR  - Steffen A
FIR - Steffen, Amy
IR  - Peters A
FIR - Peters, Anne
IR  - Hinton P
FIR - Hinton, Perez
IR  - McGill J
FIR - McGill, Janet
IR  - Buechler L
FIR - Buechler, Lori
IR  - Tsalikian E
FIR - Tsalikian, Eva
IR  - Cabbage J
FIR - Cabbage, Joanne
IR  - Clements M
FIR - Clements, Mark
IR  - Hester L
FIR - Hester, Lois
IR  - Kruger D
FIR - Kruger, Davida
IR  - Remtema H
FIR - Remtema, Heather
IR  - Schatz D
FIR - Schatz, Desmond
IR  - Thomas J
FIR - Thomas, Jamie
IR  - Zipf W
FIR - Zipf, William
IR  - Seiple D
FIR - Seiple, Diane
IR  - Rodriguez H
FIR - Rodriguez, Henry
IR  - Henson D
FIR - Henson, Danielle
IR  - Simmons J
FIR - Simmons, Jill
IR  - Brendle F
FIR - Brendle, Faith
IR  - Nathan B
FIR - Nathan, Brandon
IR  - Schmid K
FIR - Schmid, Kara
IR  - Arnold K
FIR - Arnold, Kathleen
IR  - Sellers S
FIR - Sellers, Sharon
IR  - Harlan D
FIR - Harlan, David
IR  - Hubacz L
FIR - Hubacz, Lisa
IR  - Buse J
FIR - Buse, John
IR  - Tricome J
FIR - Tricome, Julie
IR  - Rickels M
FIR - Rickels, Michael
IR  - Dalton-Bakes C
FIR - Dalton-Bakes, Cornelia
IR  - Schroeder L
FIR - Schroeder, Leroy
IR  - Roark A
FIR - Roark, Amanda
IR  - Potter A
FIR - Potter, Amy
IR  - Brendle F
FIR - Brendle, Faith
EDAT- 2018/12/12 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/12 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/12 06:00
PHST- 2017/12/15 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/10/12 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc17-2625 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc17-2625 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2018 Dec 10. pii: dc17-2625. doi: 10.2337/dc17-2625.

PMID- 30530488
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181211
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Dec 7
TI  - Assessing the Association Between GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Use and Diabetic
      Retinopathy Through the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System.
LID - dc181893 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1893 [doi]
FAU - Wang, Tiansheng
AU  - Wang T
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0980-8896
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University
      of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC tianwang@unc.edu.
FAU - Lu, Wenchao
AU  - Lu W
AD  - Peking University Ninth School of Clinical Medicine (Beijing Shijitan Hospital,
      Capital Medical University), Beijing, China.
AD  - Department of Pharmacy Administration and Clinical Pharmacy, School of
      Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, China.
FAU - Tang, Huilin
AU  - Tang H
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5814-6657
AD  - Institute for Drug Evaluation, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, 
      China.
FAU - Buse, John B
AU  - Buse JB
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel
      Hill, NC.
FAU - Sturmer, Til
AU  - Sturmer T
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University
      of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
FAU - Gower, Emily W
AU  - Gower EW
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University
      of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
LA  - eng
PT  - Letter
DEP - 20181207
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2018/12/12 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/12 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/12 06:00
PHST- 2018/09/10 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/11/10 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-1893 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1893 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2018 Dec 7. pii: dc18-1893. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1893.

PMID- 30527598
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20181211
IS  - 1474-547X (Electronic)
IS  - 0140-6736 (Linking)
VI  - 392
IP  - 10162
DP  - 2018 Dec 1
TI  - Type 2 diabetes: the urgent need to protect young people.
PG  - 2325
LID - S0140-6736(18)33015-0 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)33015-0 [doi]
FAU - The Lancet
AU  - The Lancet
LA  - eng
PT  - Editorial
PL  - England
TA  - Lancet
JT  - Lancet (London, England)
JID - 2985213R
EDAT- 2018/12/12 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/12 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/12 06:00
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [medline]
AID - S0140-6736(18)33015-0 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)33015-0 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Lancet. 2018 Dec 1;392(10162):2325. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)33015-0.

PMID- 30462944
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20181211
LR  - 20181211
IS  - 1533-4406 (Electronic)
IS  - 0028-4793 (Linking)
VI  - 379
IP  - 21
DP  - 2018 Nov 22
TI  - Pneumococcal Bacteremia and Meningitis.
PG  - 2063
LID - 10.1056/NEJMicm1806754 [doi]
FAU - Mora Carpio, Andres L
AU  - Mora Carpio AL
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2762-6471
AD  - Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA moraandr@einstein.edu.
FAU - Stempel, Jessica M
AU  - Stempel JM
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9162-0579
AD  - Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA moraandr@einstein.edu.
LA  - eng
PT  - Case Reports
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - N Engl J Med
JT  - The New England journal of medicine
JID - 0255562
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Bacteremia/*microbiology
MH  - Blood-Air Barrier/microbiology
MH  - Cerebrospinal Fluid/microbiology
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications
MH  - HIV Infections/complications
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Meningitis, Pneumococcal/*etiology
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Splenectomy
MH  - Streptococcus pneumoniae/*isolation & purification
EDAT- 2018/11/22 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/12 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/22 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/22 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/22 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1056/NEJMicm1806754 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - N Engl J Med. 2018 Nov 22;379(21):2063. doi: 10.1056/NEJMicm1806754.

PMID- 30380383
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20181211
LR  - 20181211
IS  - 1533-4406 (Electronic)
IS  - 0028-4793 (Linking)
VI  - 379
IP  - 18
DP  - 2018 Nov 1
TI  - Complements from the Lung.
PG  - 1767-1773
LID - 10.1056/NEJMcps1802644 [doi]
FAU - Downing, Nicholas S
AU  - Downing NS
AD  - From the Departments of Medicine (N.S.D., C.J.M., B.D.L., J.L.) and Pathology
      (H.G.R.), Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School - both in
      Boston.
FAU - McMullan, Ciaran J
AU  - McMullan CJ
AD  - From the Departments of Medicine (N.S.D., C.J.M., B.D.L., J.L.) and Pathology
      (H.G.R.), Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School - both in
      Boston.
FAU - Rennke, Helmut G
AU  - Rennke HG
AD  - From the Departments of Medicine (N.S.D., C.J.M., B.D.L., J.L.) and Pathology
      (H.G.R.), Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School - both in
      Boston.
FAU - Levy, Bruce D
AU  - Levy BD
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9515-5731
AD  - From the Departments of Medicine (N.S.D., C.J.M., B.D.L., J.L.) and Pathology
      (H.G.R.), Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School - both in
      Boston.
FAU - Loscalzo, Joseph
AU  - Loscalzo J
AD  - From the Departments of Medicine (N.S.D., C.J.M., B.D.L., J.L.) and Pathology
      (H.G.R.), Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School - both in
      Boston.
LA  - eng
PT  - Case Reports
PT  - Clinical Conference
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - N Engl J Med
JT  - The New England journal of medicine
JID - 0255562
RN  - 0 (Immunoglobulin A)
RN  - AYI8EX34EU (Creatinine)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Biopsy
MH  - Chest Pain/*etiology
MH  - Community-Acquired Infections/complications
MH  - Creatinine/blood
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications
MH  - Diagnosis, Differential
MH  - Empyema, Pleural/complications/*diagnosis
MH  - Glomerulonephritis/complications/*diagnosis
MH  - Humans
MH  - Immunoglobulin A/analysis
MH  - Kidney/immunology/*pathology
MH  - Lung/diagnostic imaging
MH  - Male
MH  - Pleural Effusion/diagnostic imaging
MH  - Pneumonia, Bacterial/complications
MH  - Radiography, Thoracic
MH  - Staphylococcal Infections/diagnosis
MH  - Staphylococcus aureus
MH  - Tomography, X-Ray Computed
EDAT- 2018/11/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/12 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/01 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/12 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1056/NEJMcps1802644 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - N Engl J Med. 2018 Nov 1;379(18):1767-1773. doi: 10.1056/NEJMcps1802644.