PMID- 28799294
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180702
LR  - 20180711
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 11
DP  - 2017 Nov
TI  - The prevalence of diabetes-specific emotional distress in people with Type 2
      diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
PG  - 1508-1520
LID - 10.1111/dme.13448 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: Psychological comorbidity, such as depression and/or diabetes-specific
      emotional distress (diabetes distress), is widespread in people with Type 2
      diabetes and is associated with poorer treatment outcomes. Although extensive
      research into the prevalence of depression has been conducted, the same attention
      has not been given to diabetes distress. The aim of this systematic review was to
      determine the overall prevalence of diabetes distress in people with Type 2
      diabetes. METHODS: Seven databases were searched to identify potentially relevant
      studies; eligible studies (adult population aged > 18 years with Type 2 diabetes 
      and an outcome measure of diabetes distress) were selected and appraised
      independently by two reviewers. Multiple fixed- and random-effects meta-analyses 
      were performed to synthesize the data; with primary analyses to determine the
      overall prevalence of diabetes distress in people with Type 2 diabetes, and
      secondary meta-analyses and meta-regression to explore the prevalence across
      different variables. RESULTS: Fifty-five studies (n = 36 998) were included in
      the meta-analysis and demonstrated an overall prevalence of 36% for diabetes
      distress in people with Type 2 diabetes. Prevalence of diabetes distress was
      significantly higher in samples with a higher prevalence of comorbid depressive
      symptoms and a female sample majority. CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes distress is a
      prominent issue in people with Type 2 diabetes that is associated with female
      gender and comorbid depressive symptoms. It is important to consider the
      relationship between diabetes distress and depression, and the significant
      overlap between conditions. Further work is needed to explore psychological
      comorbidity in Type 2 diabetes to better understand how best to identify and
      appropriately treat individuals.
CI  - (c) 2017 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Perrin, N E
AU  - Perrin NE
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-0471-4903
AD  - Diabetes Research Centre, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and
      Psychology, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.
FAU - Davies, M J
AU  - Davies MJ
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-9987-9371
AD  - Diabetes Research Centre, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and
      Psychology, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.
FAU - Robertson, N
AU  - Robertson N
AD  - School of Psychology, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology,
      University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.
FAU - Snoek, F J
AU  - Snoek FJ
AD  - Department of Medical Psychology, VU University Medical Centre, Academic Medical 
      Centre Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
FAU - Khunti, K
AU  - Khunti K
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-2343-7099
AD  - Diabetes Research Centre, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and
      Psychology, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Meta-Analysis
PT  - Review
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170831
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Depression/epidemiology/etiology
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications/*epidemiology/*psychology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - Stress, Psychological/*epidemiology/etiology
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/08/12 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/03 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/12 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/08 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/03 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/12 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13448 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Nov;34(11):1508-1520. doi: 10.1111/dme.13448. Epub 2017 Aug 31.

PMID- 28799282
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180702
LR  - 20180711
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 11
DP  - 2017 Nov
TI  - Self-compassion is associated with optimum self-care behaviour, medical outcomes 
      and psychological well-being in a cross-sectional sample of adults with diabetes.
PG  - 1546-1553
LID - 10.1111/dme.13451 [doi]
AB  - AIM: To investigate the role of self-compassion in diabetes outcomes.
      Self-compassion is a construct which may be relevant to chronic conditions, given
      its focus on compassion toward oneself, especially in times of difficulty.
      METHODS: In this cross-sectional study we collected data online from 310 adults
      diagnosed with diabetes. The questionnaire measured three primary outcomes:
      self-management behaviours; HbA1c levels and psychological well-being. Potential 
      predictors were also assessed, including self-compassion, locus of control,
      social support and demographics. RESULTS: Multiple regression analyses showed
      that self-compassion had the most consistent association with better outcomes,
      including all forms of self-management behaviour, HbA1c levels and psychological 
      well-being. Self-compassion was independently associated with 55.1% of the
      variance in well-being. Internal locus of control was also significantly
      associated with better well-being and HbA1c outcomes. Chance and external locus
      of control and social support were generally associated with poorer outcomes.
      CONCLUSIONS: Higher levels of self-compassion are typically associated with
      improved self-management behaviour, medical outcomes and psychological well-being
      in adults with diabetes mellitus. The present findings suggest that
      self-compassion may be a parsimonious and suitable intervention target. Future
      interventions and consultations with medical professionals may benefit from
      fostering self-compassion in adults with diabetes mellitus.
CI  - (c) 2017 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Ferrari, M
AU  - Ferrari M
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-1824-6661
AD  - School of Psychology, Australian Catholic University, Strathfield, New South
      Wales, Australia.
AD  - School of Psychology, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
FAU - Dal Cin, M
AU  - Dal Cin M
AD  - School of Psychology, Australian Catholic University, Strathfield, New South
      Wales, Australia.
FAU - Steele, M
AU  - Steele M
AD  - School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Brisbane, Queensland,
      Australia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170911
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology/*psychology/*therapy
MH  - Empathy/*physiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Health Behavior/*physiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - *Self Care
MH  - *Self Concept
MH  - Social Support
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH  - Treatment Outcome
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/08/12 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/03 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/12 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/08 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/03 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/12 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13451 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Nov;34(11):1546-1553. doi: 10.1111/dme.13451. Epub 2017 Sep 11.

PMID- 28799221
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20171115
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 12
DP  - 2017 Dec
TI  - REPOSE: repositioning insulin pump therapy in Type 1 diabetes.
PG  - 1656-1657
LID - 10.1111/dme.13449 [doi]
FAU - Oliver, N S
AU  - Oliver NS
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3525-3633
AD  - Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine,
      Faculty of Medicine Imperial College, London, UK.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2017/08/12 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/12 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/12 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/08 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/08/12 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/12 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13449 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Dec;34(12):1656-1657. doi: 10.1111/dme.13449.

PMID- 28799212
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180702
LR  - 20180711
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 11
DP  - 2017 Nov
TI  - Excess psychosocial burden in women with diabetes and premature acute coronary
      syndrome.
PG  - 1568-1574
LID - 10.1111/dme.13452 [doi]
AB  - AIM: Diabetes is a stronger risk factor for acute coronary syndrome for women
      than men. We investigate whether behavioural and psychosocial factors contribute 
      to the disparity in acute coronary syndrome risk and outcomes among women with
      diabetes relative to women without diabetes and men. METHODS: Among 939
      participants in the GENESIS-PRAXY cohort study of premature acute coronary
      syndrome (age </= 55 years), we compared the prevalence of traditional and
      non-traditional factors by sex and Type 2 diabetes status. In a case-only
      analysis, we used generalized logit models to investigate the influence of
      traditional and non-traditional factors on the interaction of sex and diabetes.
      RESULTS: In 287 women (14.3% with diabetes) and 652 men (10.4% with diabetes),
      women and men with diabetes showed a heavier burden of traditional cardiac risk
      factors compared with individuals without diabetes. Women with diabetes were more
      likely to be the primary earner and have more anxiety relative to women without
      diabetes, and reported worse perceived health compared with women without
      diabetes and men with diabetes. The interaction term for sex and diabetes (odds
      ratio (OR) 1.40, 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) 0.83-2.36) was diminished
      after additional adjustment for non-traditional factors (OR 1.12, 95% CI
      0.54-2.32), but not traditional factors alone (OR 1.41, 95% CI 0.84-2.36).
      CONCLUSIONS: We observed trends toward a more adverse psychosocial profile among 
      women with diabetes and incident acute coronary syndrome compared with women
      without diabetes and men with diabetes, which may explain the increased risk of
      acute coronary syndrome in women with diabetes and may also contribute to worse
      outcomes.
CI  - (c) 2017 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Peters, T M
AU  - Peters TM
AD  - Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec,
      Canada.
FAU - Pelletier, R
AU  - Pelletier R
AD  - Divisions of Clinical Epidemiology and General Internal Medicine, The Research
      Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
FAU - Behlouli, H
AU  - Behlouli H
AD  - Divisions of Clinical Epidemiology and General Internal Medicine, The Research
      Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
FAU - Rossi, A M
AU  - Rossi AM
AD  - Divisions of Clinical Epidemiology and General Internal Medicine, The Research
      Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
FAU - Pilote, L
AU  - Pilote L
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-6159-0628
AD  - Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec,
      Canada.
AD  - Divisions of Clinical Epidemiology and General Internal Medicine, The Research
      Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
LA  - eng
GR  - CIHR/Canada
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170907
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
SB  - IM
MH  - Acute Coronary Syndrome/*epidemiology/psychology
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Age of Onset
MH  - Cohort Studies
MH  - *Cost of Illness
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*complications/*epidemiology/psychology
MH  - Diabetic Angiopathies/epidemiology/psychology
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Sex Factors
MH  - Stress, Psychological/*epidemiology/etiology
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/08/12 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/03 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/12 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/08 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/03 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/12 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13452 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Nov;34(11):1568-1574. doi: 10.1111/dme.13452. Epub 2017 Sep 7.

PMID- 28792638
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180702
LR  - 20180711
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 11
DP  - 2017 Nov
TI  - Transmission of Type 2 diabetes to sons and daughters: the D.E.S.I.R. cohort.
PG  - 1615-1622
LID - 10.1111/dme.13446 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To document the family transmission of Type 2 diabetes to men and women.
      METHOD: The French D.E.S.I.R. cohort followed men and women over 9 years, with
      3-yearly testing for incident Type 2 diabetes. First- and/or second-degree family
      histories of diabetes were available for 2187 men and 2282 women. Age-adjusted
      hazard ratios were estimated for various family members and groupings of family
      members, as well as for a genetic diabetes risk score, based on 65
      diabetes-associated loci. RESULTS: Over 9 years, 136 men and 63 women had
      incident Type 2 diabetes. The hazard ratios for diabetes associated with having a
      first-degree family member with diabetes (parents, siblings, children) differed
      between men [1.21 (95% CI 0.80, 1.85)] and women [3.02 (95% CI 1.83, 4.99);
      Pinteraction =0.006]. The genetic risk score was predictive of diabetes in both
      men and women, with similar hazard ratios 1.10 (95% CI 1.06, 1.15) and 1.08 (95% 
      CI 1.02, 1.14) respectively, for each additional at-risk allele. In women, the
      risk associated with having a family member with diabetes persisted after
      adjusting for the genetic score. CONCLUSION: Women with a family history of
      diabetes (paternal or maternal) were at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and
      this risk was independent of a genetic score; in contrast, for men, there was no 
      association. Diabetes screening and prevention may need to more specifically
      target women with diabetes in their family, but further studies are required as
      the number of people with diabetes in this study was small.
CI  - (c) 2017 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Balkau, B
AU  - Balkau B
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-2021-413X
AD  - CESP, Faculty of Medicine, University Paris-South.
AD  - Faculty of Medicine, University Versailles-St Quentin.
AD  - INSERM U1018, Faculty of Medicine, University Paris-Saclay, Villejuif.
FAU - Roussel, R
AU  - Roussel R
AD  - Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, INSERM, Bichat Hospital, Paris.
FAU - Wagner, S
AU  - Wagner S
AD  - CESP, Faculty of Medicine, University Paris-South.
AD  - Faculty of Medicine, University Versailles-St Quentin.
AD  - INSERM U1018, Faculty of Medicine, University Paris-Saclay, Villejuif.
FAU - Tichet, J
AU  - Tichet J
AD  - IRSA, La Riche.
FAU - Froguel, P
AU  - Froguel P
AD  - CNRS, UMR8199, Pasteur Institute of Lille, European Genomic Institute for
      Diabetes, Lille University, Lille, France.
AD  - Department of Genomics of Common Disease, School of Public Health, Imperial
      College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK.
FAU - Fagherazzi, G
AU  - Fagherazzi G
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-5033-5966
AD  - CESP, Faculty of Medicine, University Paris-South.
AD  - Faculty of Medicine, University Versailles-St Quentin.
AD  - INSERM U1018, Faculty of Medicine, University Paris-Saclay, Villejuif.
AD  - Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif.
FAU - Bonnet, F
AU  - Bonnet F
AD  - CESP, Faculty of Medicine, University Paris-South.
AD  - Faculty of Medicine, University Versailles-St Quentin.
AD  - INSERM U1018, Faculty of Medicine, University Paris-Saclay, Villejuif.
AD  - CHU Rennes, University Rennes 1, Rennes, France.
CN  - D.E.S.I.R. Study Group
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170903
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Cohort Studies
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*epidemiology/*genetics
MH  - Family
MH  - Female
MH  - Follow-Up Studies
MH  - France/epidemiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - *Medical History Taking
MH  - Metabolic Syndrome/complications/epidemiology/genetics
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Risk Factors
EDAT- 2017/08/10 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/03 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/10 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/04 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/03 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/10 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13446 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Nov;34(11):1615-1622. doi: 10.1111/dme.13446. Epub 2017 Sep 3.

PMID- 28792634
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180727
LR  - 20180802
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 12
DP  - 2017 Dec
TI  - Meeting American Diabetes Association diabetes management targets: trends in
      Mauritius.
PG  - 1719-1727
LID - 10.1111/dme.13447 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To examine the proportion of people with diabetes in the multi-ethnic
      country of Mauritius meeting American Diabetes Association targets in 2009 and
      2015. METHODS: Data from independent population-based samples of 858 and 656
      adults with diagnosed diabetes in 2009 and 2015, respectively, were analysed with
      regard to recommended American Diabetes Association targets for HbA1c , blood
      pressure and LDL cholesterol. RESULTS: In 2015 compared with 2009, the proportion
      of people achieving American Diabetes Association targets for glycaemic control
      in Mauritius was higher in women (P</=0.01) and in those with only a primary
      education level (P=0.07), but not in men or people with a higher level of
      education. Achievement of blood pressure <140/90 mmHg was higher in 2015 compared
      with 2009 (60% vs 42%) in people of South Asian ethnicity (P<0.001), but not in
      those of African ethnicity (P=0.16). The percentages of people with LDL
      cholesterol <2.59 mmol/l were 42.1% and 50.4%, in 2009 and 2015, respectively
      (P=0.27). Better control of HbA1c and blood pressure was observed in groups in
      which that control was poorest in 2009. The use of glucose-, blood pressure- and 
      LDL cholesterol-lowering medication was higher in 2015 than in 2009. CONCLUSIONS:
      In certain subgroups, namely women, those with poorer education and those of
      South Asian ethnicity, whose target achievement was the poorest in 2009, control 
      of glycaemia and blood pressure was better in 2015 as compared with 2009. While
      these findings are encouraging, further work is required to improve outcomes.
CI  - (c) 2017 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Tabesh, M
AU  - Tabesh M
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-3769-9666
AD  - Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne,
      Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Shaw, J E
AU  - Shaw JE
AD  - Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne,
      Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Zimmet, P Z
AU  - Zimmet PZ
AD  - Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
AD  - Department of Medicine, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne,
      Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Soderberg, S
AU  - Soderberg S
AD  - Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
AD  - Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umea University and Heart
      Center, Umea, Sweden.
FAU - Kowlessur, S
AU  - Kowlessur S
AD  - Ministry of Health and Quality of Life, Republic of Mauritius.
FAU - Timol, M
AU  - Timol M
AD  - Ministry of Health and Quality of Life, Republic of Mauritius.
FAU - Joonas, N
AU  - Joonas N
AD  - Ministry of Health and Quality of Life, Republic of Mauritius.
FAU - Alberti, G M M
AU  - Alberti GMM
AD  - Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St Mary's Hospital and Imperial
      College, London, UK.
FAU - Tuomilehto, J
AU  - Tuomilehto J
AD  - Chronic Disease Prevention Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare,
      Helsinki, Finland.
AD  - Dasman Diabetes Institute, Dasman, Kuwait.
AD  - Department of Neurosciences and Preventive Medicine, Danube-University Krems,
      Austria.
AD  - Diabetes Research Group, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
FAU - Shaw, B J
AU  - Shaw BJ
AD  - Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Magliano, D J
AU  - Magliano DJ
AD  - Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne,
      Victoria, Australia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170831
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
RN  - 0 (Blood Glucose)
RN  - 0 (Glycated Hemoglobin A)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Blood Glucose/metabolism
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood/*epidemiology/*therapy
MH  - Ethnic Groups
MH  - Female
MH  - Glycated Hemoglobin A/*metabolism
MH  - Guideline Adherence/*statistics & numerical data/*trends
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Mauritius/epidemiology
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - *Patient Care Planning/standards/trends
MH  - Practice Guidelines as Topic
MH  - Societies, Medical/standards
MH  - United States
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/08/10 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/28 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/10 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/04 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/28 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/10 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13447 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Dec;34(12):1719-1727. doi: 10.1111/dme.13447. Epub 2017 Aug 31.

PMID- 28792627
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
LR  - 20180711
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 11
DP  - 2017 Nov
TI  - Physical activity and Type 1 diabetes: an underused therapy.
PG  - 1498-1499
LID - 10.1111/dme.13445 [doi]
FAU - Yates, T
AU  - Yates T
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-5724-5178
AD  - Diabetes Research Centre, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.
AD  - National Institute for Health Research, Leicester Biomedical Research Centre,
      University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.
FAU - Davies, M J
AU  - Davies MJ
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-9987-9371
AD  - Diabetes Research Centre, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.
AD  - National Institute for Health Research, Leicester Biomedical Research Centre,
      University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170914
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2017/08/10 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/10 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/10 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/08/10 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/10 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13445 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Nov;34(11):1498-1499. doi: 10.1111/dme.13445. Epub 2017 Sep 14.

PMID- 28782842
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180727
LR  - 20180802
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 12
DP  - 2017 Dec
TI  - Diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and a history of
      polycystic ovary syndrome: a retrospective cohort study.
PG  - 1684-1695
LID - 10.1111/dme.13444 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To investigate whether polycystic ovary syndrome further increases
      postpartum diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and to
      explore relationships between polycystic ovary syndrome and incident diabetes in 
      women who do not develop gestational diabetes. METHODS: This retrospective cohort
      study (Quebec Physician Services Claims; Hospitalization Discharge Databases;
      Birth and Death registries) included 34 686 women with gestational diabetes
      during pregnancy (live birth), matched 1:1 to women without gestational diabetes 
      by age group, year of delivery and health region. Diagnostic codes were used to
      define polycystic ovary syndrome and incident diabetes. Cox regression models
      were used to examine associations between polycystic ovary syndrome and incident 
      diabetes. RESULTS: Polycystic ovary syndrome was present in 1.5% of women with
      gestational diabetes and 1.2% of women without gestational diabetes. There were
      more younger mothers and mothers who were not of white European ancestry among
      those with polycystic ovary syndrome. Those with polycystic ovary syndrome more
      often had a comorbidity and a lower proportion had a previous pregnancy.
      Polycystic ovary syndrome was associated with incident diabetes (hazard ratio
      1.52; 95% CI 1.27, 1.82) among women with gestational diabetes. No conclusive
      associations between polycystic ovary syndrome and diabetes were identified
      (hazard ratio 0.94; 95% CI 0.39, 2.27) in women without gestational diabetes.
      CONCLUSION: In women with gestational diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome confers
      additional risk for incident diabetes postpartum. In women without gestational
      diabetes, an association between PCOS and incident diabetes was not observed.
      Given the already elevated risk of diabetes in women with a history of
      gestational diabetes, a history of both polycystic ovary syndrome and gestational
      diabetes signal a critical need for diabetes surveillance and prevention.
CI  - (c) 2017 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Bond, R
AU  - Bond R
AD  - Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, McGill
      University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
FAU - Pace, R
AU  - Pace R
AD  - Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec,
      Canada.
FAU - Rahme, E
AU  - Rahme E
AD  - Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec,
      Canada.
AD  - Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
FAU - Dasgupta, K
AU  - Dasgupta K
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-2447-3553
AD  - Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec,
      Canada.
AD  - Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170901
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*epidemiology
MH  - Diabetes, Gestational/*epidemiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Incidence
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/complications/*epidemiology
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology
MH  - Pregnancy Outcome/*epidemiology
MH  - Quebec/epidemiology
MH  - Reproductive History
MH  - Retrospective Studies
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/08/08 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/28 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/08 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/02 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/08 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/28 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/08 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13444 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Dec;34(12):1684-1695. doi: 10.1111/dme.13444. Epub 2017 Sep 1.

PMID- 28779518
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180702
LR  - 20180711
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 11
DP  - 2017 Nov
TI  - Effect of multiparity and ethnicity on the risk of development of diabetes: a
      large population-based cohort study.
PG  - 1637-1645
LID - 10.1111/dme.13441 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To investigate the relationship between increasing parity and diabetes in a
      large, population-based cohort, and to examine if this relationship is different 
      among high-risk ethnic groups. METHODS: A population-based, retrospective cohort 
      study was performed in 738 440 women aged 18-50 years, who delivered babies in
      Ontario between 1 April 2002 and 31 March 2011. Diabetes incidence postpartum was
      calculated for each parity and ethnic group. A multivariable analysis of the
      effect of parity and ethnicity on the incidence of diabetes was performed using a
      Cox proportional hazards model, adjusting for confounders. RESULTS: The diabetes 
      incidence rate per 1000 person-years was 3.69 in women with 1 delivery, 4.12 in
      women with 3 deliveries and 7.62 in women with >/=5 deliveries. Women with >/=3
      deliveries had a higher risk of developing diabetes compared with women with 1
      delivery [adjusted hazard ratios 1.06 (95% CI 1.01-1.11) for 3 deliveries, 1.33
      (95% CI 1.25-1.43) for 4 deliveries and 1.53 (95% CI 1.41-1.66) for >/=5
      deliveries). A similar rise in risk could be seen in Chinese and South-Asian
      women, with the most influence in Chinese women [hazard ratio 4.59 (95% CI
      2.36-8.92) for >/=5 deliveries]. CONCLUSIONS: There was a positive and graded
      relationship between increasing parity and risk of development of diabetes. The
      influence of parity was seen in all ethnicities. This association may be partly
      related to increasing weight gain and retention with increasing parity, or
      deterioration in beta-cell function. This merits further exploration.
CI  - (c) 2017 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Almahmeed, B
AU  - Almahmeed B
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Shah, B R
AU  - Shah BR
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-3598-3628
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre,
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Mukerji, G
AU  - Mukerji G
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - Women's College Institute of Health Systems Solutions and Virtual Care and the
      Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Women's College Hospital, Toronto,
      Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Ling, V
AU  - Ling V
AD  - Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Booth, G L
AU  - Booth GL
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-2769-6522
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, Toronto, Ontario,
      Canada.
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto,
      Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Feig, D S
AU  - Feig DS
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-8561-7584
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism and the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research
      Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170821
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Cohort Studies
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*epidemiology/ethnology
MH  - Ethnic Groups/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Incidence
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Ontario/epidemiology
MH  - Parity/*physiology
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Retrospective Studies
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/08/06 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/03 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/06 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/01 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/03 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/06 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13441 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Nov;34(11):1637-1645. doi: 10.1111/dme.13441. Epub 2017 Aug 21.

PMID- 28779502
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180727
LR  - 20180802
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 12
DP  - 2017 Dec
TI  - Clinic variation in glycaemic control for children with Type 1 diabetes in
      England and Wales: a population-based, multilevel analysis.
PG  - 1710-1718
LID - 10.1111/dme.13442 [doi]
AB  - AIM: To understand the scope for improving children's glycaemic outcomes by
      reducing variation between clinics and examine the role of insulin regimen and
      clinic characteristics. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of 2012-2013 National
      Paediatric Diabetes Audit data from 21 773 children aged < 19 years with Type 1
      diabetes cared for at 176 clinics organized into 11 regional diabetes networks in
      England and Wales. Variation in HbA1c was explored by multilevel models with a
      random effect for clinic. The impact of clinic context was quantified by
      computing the per cent of total variation in HbA1c which occurs between clinics
      (intraclass correlation coefficient; ICC). RESULTS: Overall, 69 of the 176
      diabetes clinics (39%) had a glycaemic performance that differed significantly
      from the national average after adjusting for patient case-mix with respect to
      age, gender, diabetes duration, deprivation and ethnicity. However, differences
      between clinics accounted for 4.7% of the total variation in HbA1c . Inclusion of
      within-clinic HbA1c standard deviation led to a substantial reduction in ICC to
      2.4%. Insulin regimen, clinic volume and diabetes networks had a small or
      moderate impact on ICC. CONCLUSIONS: Differences between diabetes clinics
      accounted for only a small portion of the total variation in glycaemic control
      because most of the variation was within clinics. This implies that national
      glycaemic improvements might best be achieved not only by targeting poor centres 
      but also by shifting the whole distribution of clinics to higher levels of
      quality.
CI  - (c) 2017 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Charalampopoulos, D
AU  - Charalampopoulos D
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-3763-3130
AD  - University College London Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, 
      UK.
FAU - Amin, R
AU  - Amin R
AD  - University College London Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, 
      UK.
FAU - Warner, J T
AU  - Warner JT
AD  - Department of Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Children's Hospital for
      Wales, Cardiff, UK.
FAU - Muniz-Terrera, G
AU  - Muniz-Terrera G
AD  - Centre for Dementia Prevention, University of Edinburgh, Royal Edinburgh
      Hospital, Edinburgh, UK.
FAU - Mazarello Paes, V
AU  - Mazarello Paes V
AD  - University College London Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, 
      UK.
FAU - Viner, R M
AU  - Viner RM
AD  - University College London Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, 
      UK.
FAU - Stephenson, T
AU  - Stephenson T
AD  - University College London Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, 
      UK.
LA  - eng
GR  - P01 AG043362/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170831
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
RN  - 0 (Blood Glucose)
RN  - 0 (Glycated Hemoglobin A)
RN  - 0 (Hypoglycemic Agents)
RN  - 0 (Insulin)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Biological Variation, Population
MH  - Blood Glucose/*metabolism
MH  - Child
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Clinical Audit
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/*blood/*drug therapy/*epidemiology
MH  - England/epidemiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Glycated Hemoglobin A/metabolism
MH  - Humans
MH  - Hypoglycemic Agents/*therapeutic use
MH  - Infant
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - Insulin/therapeutic use
MH  - Male
MH  - Multilevel Analysis
MH  - Self Care
MH  - Wales/epidemiology
EDAT- 2017/08/06 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/28 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/06 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/01 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/28 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/06 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13442 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Dec;34(12):1710-1718. doi: 10.1111/dme.13442. Epub 2017 Aug 31.

PMID- 28779484
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180702
LR  - 20180711
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 11
DP  - 2017 Nov
TI  - Gestational diabetes care and outcomes for refugee women: a population-based
      cohort study.
PG  - 1608-1614
LID - 10.1111/dme.13440 [doi]
AB  - AIM: To determine the prevalence of adverse clinical outcomes, the rates of
      healthcare utilization, and the incidence of post-partum Type 2 diabetes in
      refugees with gestational diabetes (GDM), compared with other immigrants and
      non-immigrants. METHODS: A population-based cohort study was conducted using
      healthcare databases in Ontario, Canada. Over 40 000 women with GDM having
      singleton live births between 2002 and 2014 were identified. We identified GDM
      adverse outcomes such as macrosomia, pre-eclampsia and respiratory distress
      syndrome. Antenatal and newborn healthcare utilization were ascertained. Women
      were then followed for diagnosis of diabetes post-partum. RESULTS: Both refugees 
      and other immigrants had a lower rate than non-immigrants of many adverse GDM
      outcomes, including pre-eclampsia [relative risk (RR) 0.65, 95% confidence
      interval (95% CI) 0.44-0.95 and 0.61, 95% CI 0.52-0.72, respectively], preterm
      birth (RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.75-0.995 and 0.85, 95% CI 0.80-0.91, respectively), and 
      respiratory distress syndrome (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.70-0.97 and 0.78, 95% CI
      0.72-0.84, respectively). However, refugees were less likely to attend well-baby 
      care in time for the first routine vaccination (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.88-0.95).
      Incidence of post-partum diabetes was high in all groups, but refugee women were 
      at increased risk (hazard ratio 1.23, 95% CI 1.11-1.37). CONCLUSIONS: Despite
      different circumstances leading to migration, refugees have a similar 'healthy
      immigrant effect' to other immigrants, with respect to adverse GDM outcomes.
      However, newborns of refugees were less likely to have well-baby care, and
      refugee women were also at especially high risk of developing diabetes
      post-partum. These are both important public health issues.
CI  - (c) 2017 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Khan, S
AU  - Khan S
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Toronto.
FAU - Yao, Z
AU  - Yao Z
AD  - Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences.
FAU - Shah, B R
AU  - Shah BR
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-3598-3628
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Toronto.
AD  - Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences.
AD  - Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170823
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Cohort Studies
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology
MH  - Diabetes, Gestational/epidemiology/*therapy
MH  - Female
MH  - Fetal Macrosomia/epidemiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - Ontario/epidemiology
MH  - Postpartum Period
MH  - Pre-Eclampsia/epidemiology
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology/therapy
MH  - Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology
MH  - Puerperal Disorders/epidemiology
MH  - *Refugees/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Treatment Outcome
EDAT- 2017/08/06 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/03 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/06 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/01 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/03 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/06 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13440 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Nov;34(11):1608-1614. doi: 10.1111/dme.13440. Epub 2017 Aug 23.

id: 28793985 Error occurred: PMID 28793985 is a duplicate of PMID 29061661

PMID- 28798086
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180320
LR  - 20180426
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 40
IP  - 10
DP  - 2017 Oct
TI  - The Changing Tides of the Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic-Smooth Sailing or Troubled
      Waters Ahead? Kelly West Award Lecture 2016.
PG  - 1289-1297
LID - 10.2337/dci16-0055 [doi]
AB  - The Kelly West Award for Outstanding Achievement in Epidemiology is given in
      memory of Kelly M. West, widely regarded as the "father of diabetes
      epidemiology," to an individual who has made significant contributions to the
      field of diabetes epidemiology. Edward W. Gregg, PhD, of the Division of Diabetes
      Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, received
      the prestigious award at the American Diabetes Association's 76th Scientific
      Sessions, 10-14 June 2016, in New Orleans, LA. He presented the Kelly West Award 
      Lecture, "Changing Tides of the Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic-Smooth Sailing or
      Troubled Waters Ahead?" on Sunday, 12 June 2016.
CI  - (c) 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Gregg, Edward W
AU  - Gregg EW
AD  - Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
      Atlanta, GA edg7@cdc.gov.
LA  - eng
PT  - Historical Article
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
DEP - 20170810
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
SB  - IM
CIN - Diabetes Care. 2017 Oct;40(10 ):1298-1301. PMID: 28931705
MH  - Awards and Prizes
MH  - Chronic Disease
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*epidemiology/*therapy
MH  - Epidemiology/history
MH  - History, 21st Century
MH  - Humans
MH  - Incidence
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - United States
EDAT- 2017/08/12 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/21 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/12 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/21 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/12 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dci16-0055 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dci16-0055 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2017 Oct;40(10):1289-1297. doi: 10.2337/dci16-0055. Epub 2017 Aug 
      10.

PMID- 28798085
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180320
LR  - 20180426
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 40
IP  - 10
DP  - 2017 Oct
TI  - The Association of Falling Insulin Requirements With Maternal Biomarkers and
      Placental Dysfunction: A Prospective Study of Women With Preexisting Diabetes in 
      Pregnancy.
PG  - 1323-1330
LID - 10.2337/dc17-0391 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of falling insulin requirements (FIR)
      among women with preexisting diabetes with adverse obstetric outcomes and
      maternal biomarkers longitudinally in pregnancy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A
      multicenter prospective cohort study of 158 women (41 with type 1 diabetes and
      117 with type 2 diabetes) was conducted. Women with FIR of >/=15% from the peak
      total daily dose after 20 weeks' gestation were considered case subjects (n =
      32). The primary outcome was a composite of clinical markers of placental
      dysfunction (preeclampsia, small for gestational age [</=5th centile],
      stillbirth, premature delivery [<30 weeks], and placental abruption). Maternal
      circulating angiogenic markers (placental growth factor [PlGF] and soluble
      fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 [sFlt-1]), placental hormones (human placental
      lactogen, progesterone, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha), HbA1c, and creatinine
      were studied serially during pregnancy. RESULTS: FIR >/=15% were associated with 
      an increased risk of the composite primary outcome (odds ratio [OR] 4.38 [95% CI 
      1.9-10.3]; P < 0.001), preeclampsia (OR 6.76 [95% CI 2.7-16.7]; P < 0.001), and
      was more common among women with type 1 diabetes (36.6 vs. 14.5%; P = 0.002).
      Creatinine was modestly elevated among women with FIR >/=15%; however, there was 
      no difference in HbA1c. The ratio of sFlt-1 to PlGF was significantly higher
      among women with FIR at 25, 30, and 36 weeks, with differences maintained in the 
      subgroup that developed preeclampsia. There was no difference in placental
      hormones between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first prospective study to 
      associate FIR with altered expression of placental antiangiogenic factors and
      preeclampsia. FIR are an important clinical sign, among women with preexisting
      diabetes, that should alert the clinician to investigate underlying placental
      dysfunction.
CI  - (c) 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Padmanabhan, Suja
AU  - Padmanabhan S
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-5418-3699
AD  - Diabetes and Endocrinology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
      suja_padman@yahoo.com.au.
AD  - Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
FAU - Lee, Vincent W
AU  - Lee VW
AD  - Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
AD  - Renal Medicine, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
FAU - Mclean, Mark
AU  - Mclean M
AD  - Diabetes and Endocrinology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales,
      Australia.
AD  - Diabetes and Endocrinology, Blacktown Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales,
      Australia.
AD  - Western Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
FAU - Athayde, Neil
AU  - Athayde N
AD  - Obstetric Medicine, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
FAU - Lanzarone, Valeria
AU  - Lanzarone V
AD  - Obstetric Medicine, Nepean Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
FAU - Khoshnow, Qemer
AU  - Khoshnow Q
AD  - Obstetric Medicine, Nepean Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
FAU - Peek, Michael J
AU  - Peek MJ
AD  - College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, The Australian National University,
      Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia.
FAU - Cheung, N Wah
AU  - Cheung NW
AD  - Diabetes and Endocrinology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales,
      Australia.
AD  - Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Multicenter Study
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170810
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
RN  - 0 (Biomarkers)
RN  - 0 (Glycated Hemoglobin A)
RN  - 0 (Insulin)
RN  - 0 (Placental Hormones)
RN  - AYI8EX34EU (Creatinine)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Biomarkers/*blood
MH  - Creatinine/blood
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/*blood/drug therapy
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*blood/drug therapy
MH  - Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
MH  - Female
MH  - Glycated Hemoglobin A/metabolism
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant
MH  - Infant, Small for Gestational Age/growth & development
MH  - Insulin/*blood/therapeutic use
MH  - Placenta/metabolism
MH  - Placental Hormones/blood
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - Pregnancy Complications/*blood/diagnosis/drug therapy
MH  - Pregnancy Outcome
MH  - Pregnancy in Diabetics/*blood/drug therapy
MH  - Prospective Studies
EDAT- 2017/08/12 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/21 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/12 06:00
PHST- 2017/02/22 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/07/09 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/21 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/12 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc17-0391 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc17-0391 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2017 Oct;40(10):1323-1330. doi: 10.2337/dc17-0391. Epub 2017 Aug
      10.

PMID- 28790131
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180301
LR  - 20180426
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 40
IP  - 9
DP  - 2017 Sep
TI  - A Team-Based Online Game Improves Blood Glucose Control in Veterans With Type 2
      Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.
PG  - 1218-1225
LID - 10.2337/dc17-0310 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Rigorous evidence is lacking whether online games can improve
      patients' longer-term health outcomes. We investigated whether an online
      team-based game delivering diabetes self-management education (DSME) to patients 
      via e-mail or mobile application (app) can generate longer-term improvements in
      hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Patients (n = 456) on oral
      diabetes medications with HbA1c >/=58 mmol/mol were randomly assigned between a
      DSME game (with a civics booklet) and a civics game (with a DSME booklet). The
      6-month games sent two questions twice weekly via e-mail or mobile app.
      Participants accrued points based on performance, with scores posted on
      leaderboards. Winning teams and individuals received modest financial rewards.
      Our primary outcome measure was HbA1c change over 12 months. RESULTS: DSME game
      patients had significantly greater HbA1c reductions over 12 months than civics
      game patients (-8 mmol/mol [95% CI -10 to -7] and -5 mmol/mol [95% CI -7 to -3], 
      respectively; P = 0.048). HbA1c reductions were greater among patients with
      baseline HbA1c >75 mmol/mol: -16 mmol/mol [95% CI -21 to -12] and -9 mmol/mol
      [95% CI -14 to -5] for DSME and civics game patients, respectively; P = 0.031.
      CONCLUSIONS: Patients with diabetes who were randomized to an online game
      delivering DSME demonstrated sustained and meaningful HbA1c improvements. Among
      patients with poorly controlled diabetes, the DSME game reduced HbA1c by a
      magnitude comparable to starting a new diabetes medication. Online games may be a
      scalable approach to improve outcomes among geographically dispersed patients
      with diabetes and other chronic diseases.
CI  - (c) 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Kerfoot, B Price
AU  - Kerfoot BP
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-2675-835X
AD  - Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA price.kerfoot@gmail.com.
AD  - Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
FAU - Gagnon, David R
AU  - Gagnon DR
AD  - Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA.
AD  - Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center, Boston, MA.
AD  - Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston,
      MA.
FAU - McMahon, Graham T
AU  - McMahon GT
AD  - Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education and Northwestern
      University, Chicago, IL.
FAU - Orlander, Jay D
AU  - Orlander JD
AD  - Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA.
AD  - Evans Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.
FAU - Kurgansky, Katherine E
AU  - Kurgansky KE
AD  - Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA.
AD  - Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center, Boston, MA.
FAU - Conlin, Paul R
AU  - Conlin PR
AD  - Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA.
AD  - Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
AD  - Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.
LA  - eng
SI  - ClinicalTrials.gov/NCT02082704
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Randomized Controlled Trial
PT  - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
DEP - 20170808
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
RN  - 0 (Blood Glucose)
RN  - 0 (Glycated Hemoglobin A)
SB  - IM
MH  - Aged
MH  - Blood Glucose/*analysis
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood/*therapy
MH  - Electronic Mail
MH  - Female
MH  - *Games, Experimental
MH  - Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis
MH  - Health Education
MH  - Humans
MH  - Internet
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Mobile Applications
MH  - Treatment Outcome
MH  - *Veterans
EDAT- 2017/08/10 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/02 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/10 06:00
PHST- 2017/02/09 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/06/14 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/10 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/02 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/10 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc17-0310 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc17-0310 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2017 Sep;40(9):1218-1225. doi: 10.2337/dc17-0310. Epub 2017 Aug 8.

PMID- 28784725
OWN - NLM
STAT- PubMed-not-MEDLINE
LR  - 20180426
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 40
IP  - 10
DP  - 2017 Oct
TI  - Increasing Incidence but Decreasing Awareness of Type 1 Diabetes in Sweden.
PG  - e143-e144
LID - 10.2337/dc17-1175 [doi]
FAU - Ludvigsson, Johnny
AU  - Ludvigsson J
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-1695-5234
AD  - Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine,
      Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden johnny.ludvigsson@liu.se.
LA  - eng
PT  - Letter
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170807
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2017/08/09 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/09 06:01
CRDT- 2017/08/09 06:00
PHST- 2017/06/16 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/07/13 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/09 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/08/09 06:01 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/09 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc17-1175 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc17-1175 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2017 Oct;40(10):e143-e144. doi: 10.2337/dc17-1175. Epub 2017 Aug
      7.

PMID- 28779000
OWN - NLM
STAT- PubMed-not-MEDLINE
LR  - 20180426
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 40
IP  - 10
DP  - 2017 Oct
TI  - Diabetes Presentation in Infancy: High Risk of Diabetic Ketoacidosis.
PG  - e147-e148
LID - 10.2337/dc17-1145 [doi]
FAU - Letourneau, Lisa R
AU  - Letourneau LR
AD  - Section of Adult and Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism,
      Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
FAU - Carmody, David
AU  - Carmody D
AD  - Department of Endocrinology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore.
FAU - Wroblewski, Kristen
AU  - Wroblewski K
AD  - Department of Public Health Sciences, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
FAU - Denson, Anna M
AU  - Denson AM
AD  - Section of Adult and Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism,
      Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
FAU - Sanyoura, May
AU  - Sanyoura M
AD  - Section of Adult and Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism,
      Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
FAU - Naylor, Rochelle N
AU  - Naylor RN
AD  - Section of Adult and Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism,
      Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
AD  - Section of Adult and Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism,
      Department of Pediatrics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
FAU - Philipson, Louis H
AU  - Philipson LH
AD  - Section of Adult and Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism,
      Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
FAU - Greeley, Siri Atma W
AU  - Greeley SAW
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-0741-3567
AD  - Section of Adult and Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism,
      Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
      sgreeley@uchicago.edu.
AD  - Section of Adult and Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism,
      Department of Pediatrics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
LA  - eng
GR  - UL1 TR000430/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
GR  - K12 HS023007/HS/AHRQ HHS/United States
GR  - R01 DK104942/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
GR  - K23 DK094866/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
GR  - P30 DK020595/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Letter
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT  - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
DEP - 20170804
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
PMC - PMC5606305
EDAT- 2017/08/06 06:00
MHDA- 2017/08/06 06:01
CRDT- 2017/08/06 06:00
PMCR- 2018/10/01 00:00
PHST- 2017/06/08 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/07/19 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/10/01 00:00 [pmc-release]
PHST- 2017/08/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/08/06 06:01 [medline]
PHST- 2017/08/06 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc17-1145 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc17-1145 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2017 Oct;40(10):e147-e148. doi: 10.2337/dc17-1145. Epub 2017 Aug
      4.