PMID- 31385866
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190806
IS  - 1473-5571 (Electronic)
IS  - 0269-9370 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Aug 2
TI  - The use of molecular markers for cervical screening of women living with hiv in
      South Africa.
LID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002325 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: To determine the performance of molecular screening strategies for
      detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or worse (CIN3+) in
      comparison with cytology screening in women living with HIV (WLHIV). DESIGN:
      post-hoc analysis using data from a South African study cohort. METHODS: Cytology
      and human papillomavirus (HPV) based strategies were evaluated, including single 
      test and FAM19A4/miR124-2 methylation triage strategies. Participants underwent
      cytology screening and a colposcopy-directed biopsy. Valid results on cytology,
      HPV status, 16/18 genotyping, and histology were available for 318 women.
      Detection of HPV and FAM19A4/miR124-2 hypermethylation was performed on DNA from 
      cervical scrapes. Histological diagnosis of CIN3+ was used as outcome. RESULTS:
      Cytology provided highest specificity (91.6%), but lowest sensitivity (59.3%),
      whereas a single HPV test provided highest sensitivity (83.1%), but lowest
      specificity (66.4%). Combining cytology with methylation did not improve the
      performance compared with cytology alone: a slight increase in sensitivity was
      seen, at the cost of a decrease in specificity. Triage of high-risk HPV positive 
      women with methylation increased specificity (76.1%) compared with a single HPV
      or cytology test, while maintaining acceptable sensitivity (72.9%). Similar
      performance was observed for HPV16/18 with methylation triage (sensitivity 79.7%,
      specificity 74.8%). The number of women needed to refer to detect one CIN3+
      ranged from 1.5 (cytology) to 2.6 (single HPV test). CONCLUSIONS: Molecular
      screening strategies using HPV, with or without HPV16/18 genotyping, and
      FAM19A4/miR124-2 methylation have higher sensitivity with an acceptable loss in
      specificity compared with current cytology screening and are efficient for the
      detection of CIN3+ in South African WLHIV.
FAU - Kremer, Wieke W
AU  - Kremer WW
AD  - Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Pathology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, 
      Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
FAU - Van Zummeren, Marjolein
AU  - Van Zummeren M
AD  - Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Pathology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, 
      Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
FAU - Breytenbach, Erika
AU  - Breytenbach E
AD  - Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Steve Biko Academic Hospital,
      University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
FAU - Richter, Karin L
AU  - Richter KL
AD  - Department of Medical Virology, University of Pretoria and Lancet Laboratories,
      Pretoria, South Africa.
FAU - Steenbergen, Renske D M
AU  - Steenbergen RDM
AD  - Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Pathology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, 
      Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
FAU - Meijer, Chris J L M
AU  - Meijer CJLM
AD  - Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Pathology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, 
      Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
FAU - Dreyer, Greta
AU  - Dreyer G
AD  - Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Steve Biko Academic Hospital,
      University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190802
PL  - England
TA  - AIDS
JT  - AIDS (London, England)
JID - 8710219
SB  - IM
SB  - X
EDAT- 2019/08/07 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/07 06:00
CRDT- 2019/08/07 06:00
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002325 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - AIDS. 2019 Aug 2. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002325.

PMID- 31385865
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190806
IS  - 1473-5571 (Electronic)
IS  - 0269-9370 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Aug 2
TI  - Estimating and projecting the number of new HIV diagnoses and incidence in
      Spectrum's case surveillance and vital registration tool.
LID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002324 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: The United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS-supported Spectrum software
      package is used by most countries worldwide to monitor the HIV epidemic. In
      Spectrum, HIV incidence trends among adults (aged 15-49 years) are derived by
      either fitting to seroprevalence surveillance and survey data or generating
      curves consistent with case surveillance and vital registration data, such as
      historical trends in the number of newly diagnosed infections or AIDS-related
      deaths. This article describes development and application of the case
      surveillance and vital registration (CSAVR) tool for United Nations Program on
      HIV/AIDS' 2019 estimate round. METHODS: Incidence in CSAVR is either estimated
      directly using single logistic, double logistic, or spline functions, or
      indirectly via the 'r-logistic' model, which represents the (log-transformed)
      per-capita transmission rate using a logistic function. The propensity to get
      diagnosed is assumed to be monotonic, following a Gamma cumulative distribution
      function and proportional to mortality as a function of time since infection.
      Model parameters are estimated from a combination of historical surveillance data
      on newly reported HIV cases, mean CD4 at HIV diagnosis and estimates of
      AIDS-related deaths from vital registration systems. Bayesian calibration is used
      to identify the best fitting incidence trend and uncertainty bounds. RESULTS: We 
      used CSAVR to estimate HIV incidence, number of new diagnoses, mean CD4 at
      diagnosis and the proportion undiagnosed in 31 European, Latin American, Middle
      Eastern, and Asian-Pacific countries. The spline model appeared to provide the
      best fit in most countries (45%), followed by the r-logistic (25%), double
      logistic (25%), and single logistic models. The proportion of HIV-positive people
      who knew their status increased from about 0.31 [interquartile range (IQR):
      0.10-0.45] in 1990 to about 0.77 (IQR: 0.50-0.89) in 2017. The mean CD4 at
      diagnosis appeared to be stable, decreasing from 410 cells/mul (IQR: 224-567) in 
      1990 to 373 cells/mul (IQR: 174-475) by 2017. CONCLUSION: Robust case
      surveillance and vital registration data are routinely available in many
      middle-income and high-income countries while HIV seroprevalence surveillance and
      survey data may be scarce. In these countries, the CSAVR offers a simpler,
      improved approach to estimating and projecting trends in both HIV incidence and
      knowledge of HIV status.
FAU - Mahiane, Severin G
AU  - Mahiane SG
AD  - Center for Modeling and Analysis, Avenir Health, Glastonbury, Connecticut, USA.
FAU - Marsh, Kimberly
AU  - Marsh K
AD  - Strategic Information and Monitoring Division, UNAIDS, Geneva, Switzerland.
FAU - Glaubius, Robert
AU  - Glaubius R
AD  - Center for Modeling and Analysis, Avenir Health, Glastonbury, Connecticut, USA.
FAU - Eaton, Jeffrey W
AU  - Eaton JW
AD  - Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, London,
      UK.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190802
PL  - England
TA  - AIDS
JT  - AIDS (London, England)
JID - 8710219
SB  - IM
SB  - X
EDAT- 2019/08/07 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/07 06:00
CRDT- 2019/08/07 06:00
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002324 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - AIDS. 2019 Aug 2. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002324.

PMID- 31385864
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190806
IS  - 1473-5571 (Electronic)
IS  - 0269-9370 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Aug 2
TI  - The proportion of CD57+ cells among effector CD8+ T cells is lower HIV
      controllers compared to ART treated patients.
LID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002342 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: HIV infection has often been linked to faster immune aging. We sought
      to determine whether or not treatment-naive spontaneous HIV-1 controllers (HICs) 
      and ART-exposed patients differ with regard to the expression of cell senescence 
      markers. METHODS: Eighty-eight chronically infected HICs and ART-exposed patients
      (median time since infection: 15 years) with an undetectable plasma HIV RNA load 
      (for at least the previous two years) were included. We used flow cytometry to
      measure immunosenescence markers (KLRG-1 and CD57) expression in fresh blood
      samples collected from patients and healthy donors. RESULTS: For the CD8 T cell
      population as a whole, the ART-exposed but not the HIC patients exhibited a much 
      higher proportion of KLRG-1 and CD57 CD8 T cells than HDs. For the CD8 T cell
      subsets, HICs had a lower proportion of CD57 effector CD8 T cells than ART
      patients or HDs, whereas the proportions of KLRG-1 effector were similar. A
      similar trend was observed for terminal effectors. No impact of age, gender or
      standard parameters of infection (CD4 percentage, protective HLA allele, viral
      blips) was observed. The difference in the proportion of CD57 cells between HIC
      and ART was observed more specifically in long-term infected patients (>20
      years). However, when considering the CD57 effector memory and effector subsets, 
      the cytotoxic granule content was greater in HICs than in ART. CONCLUSION: The
      proportion of CD57 effector CD8 T cells is lower in HICs than in ART-exposed
      patients. This profile may be beneficial by ensuring limited senescence
      associated with consistent cytotoxic potential.
FAU - Henriquez, Soledad
AU  - Henriquez S
AD  - CEA - Universite Paris Sud 11 - INSERM U1184, Immunology of Viral Infections and 
      Autoimmune Diseases, IDMIT Department, IBFJ, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.
FAU - Lecuroux, Camille
AU  - Lecuroux C
AD  - CEA - Universite Paris Sud 11 - INSERM U1184, Immunology of Viral Infections and 
      Autoimmune Diseases, IDMIT Department, IBFJ, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.
FAU - Bitu, Marie
AU  - Bitu M
AD  - CEA - Universite Paris Sud 11 - INSERM U1184, Immunology of Viral Infections and 
      Autoimmune Diseases, IDMIT Department, IBFJ, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.
FAU - Avettand-Fenoel, Veronique
AU  - Avettand-Fenoel V
AD  - Universite[Combining Acute Accent] Paris Descartes, Faculte de Medecine, Sorbonne
      Paris Cite[Combining Acute Accent], Paris, France.
AD  - INSERM, U1016, Institut Cochin, Paris, France.
AD  - CNRS, UMR8104, Paris, France.
AD  - Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Laboratoire de Microbiologie clinique,
      Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, France.
FAU - Churaqui, Francoise
AU  - Churaqui F
AD  - CNRS, UMR8104, Paris, France.
FAU - Catalan, Pilartxo
AU  - Catalan P
AD  - Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Medecine Interne et Immunologie
      Clinique, Groupe Hospitalier Universitaire Paris Sud, Hopital Bicetre, Le
      Kremlin-Bicetre, France.
FAU - Cheret, Antoine
AU  - Cheret A
AD  - Universite[Combining Acute Accent] Paris Descartes, Faculte de Medecine, Sorbonne
      Paris Cite[Combining Acute Accent], Paris, France.
AD  - INSERM, U1016, Institut Cochin, Paris, France.
AD  - CNRS, UMR8104, Paris, France.
AD  - Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Medecine Interne et Immunologie
      Clinique, Groupe Hospitalier Universitaire Paris Sud, Hopital Bicetre, Le
      Kremlin-Bicetre, France.
FAU - Boufassa, Faroudy
AU  - Boufassa F
AD  - INSERM CESP U1018, Universite Paris Sud, Paris Saclay, Le Kremlin-Bicetre,
      France.
AD  - Universite Paris Sud, Le Kremlin Bicetre, France.
FAU - Saez-Cirion, Asier
AU  - Saez-Cirion A
AD  - Institut Pasteur, HIV Inflammation et Persistance, Paris, France.
FAU - Monceaux, Valerie
AU  - Monceaux V
AD  - Institut Pasteur, HIV Inflammation et Persistance, Paris, France.
FAU - Meyer, Laurence
AU  - Meyer L
AD  - INSERM CESP U1018, Universite Paris Sud, Paris Saclay, Le Kremlin-Bicetre,
      France.
AD  - Universite Paris Sud, Le Kremlin Bicetre, France.
AD  - Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Sante Publique, Groupe
      Hospitalier Universitaire Paris Sud, Hopital Bicetre, Le Kremlin-Bicetre, France.
FAU - Goujard, Cecile
AU  - Goujard C
AD  - Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Medecine Interne et Immunologie
      Clinique, Groupe Hospitalier Universitaire Paris Sud, Hopital Bicetre, Le
      Kremlin-Bicetre, France.
AD  - INSERM CESP U1018, Universite Paris Sud, Paris Saclay, Le Kremlin-Bicetre,
      France.
AD  - Universite Paris Sud, Le Kremlin Bicetre, France.
FAU - Lambotte, Olivier
AU  - Lambotte O
AD  - CEA - Universite Paris Sud 11 - INSERM U1184, Immunology of Viral Infections and 
      Autoimmune Diseases, IDMIT Department, IBFJ, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.
AD  - Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Medecine Interne et Immunologie
      Clinique, Groupe Hospitalier Universitaire Paris Sud, Hopital Bicetre, Le
      Kremlin-Bicetre, France.
AD  - Universite Paris Sud, Le Kremlin Bicetre, France.
FAU - Bourgeois, Christine
AU  - Bourgeois C
AD  - CEA - Universite Paris Sud 11 - INSERM U1184, Immunology of Viral Infections and 
      Autoimmune Diseases, IDMIT Department, IBFJ, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.
AD  - Universite Paris Sud, Le Kremlin Bicetre, France.
CN  - ANRS CO6 PRIMO, the ANRS CO21 CODEX cohorts
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190802
PL  - England
TA  - AIDS
JT  - AIDS (London, England)
JID - 8710219
SB  - IM
SB  - X
EDAT- 2019/08/07 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/07 06:00
CRDT- 2019/08/07 06:00
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002342 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - AIDS. 2019 Aug 2. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002342.

PMID- 31385863
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190806
IS  - 1473-5571 (Electronic)
IS  - 0269-9370 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Aug 2
TI  - Mycoplasma genitalium infection among HIV-infected pregnant African women and
      implications for mother-to-child transmission of HIV.
LID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002335 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Many sexually transmitted infections (STIs) increase risk of
      mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV, but the effect of Mycoplasma
      genitalium (MG) is not known. We hypothesized that MG infection would be common
      among HIV-infected pregnant women and could be associated with in utero and
      intrapartum MTCT. DESIGN: Observational case-cohort study METHODS:: This study
      used specimens from a Kenyan perinatal MTCT cohort (1999-2005) involving
      HIV-infected women and their infants, who received short-course zidovudine for
      prevention of MTCT. Vaginal swabs collected at 32 weeks gestation were tested for
      MG using a transcription-mediated amplification assay. Infant perinatal HIV
      infection was determined at birth and 4 weeks of age by DNA PCR. Using a
      case-cohort design, a random sample was generated with 3:1 control: case ratio;
      prevalence and correlates of MG were assessed with Chi-squared and t-tests;
      predictors of infant outcomes were analyzed using logistic regression. RESULTS:
      Among 220 HIV-infected pregnant women evaluated, 47 women (21.4%) had MG.
      Antenatal MG infection was associated with higher HIV RNA in plasma (5.0 vs. 4.6 
      log10 copies/ml in MG-positive vs. MG-negative women, p = 0.02) at 32 weeks.
      Women with MG were less likely to report prior STIs and genital ulcers (both p = 
      0.05). There was no association found between exposure to MG and perinatal MTCT
      (OR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.35, 1.51, p = 0.39). CONCLUSIONS: Vaginal MG infection was
      frequently detected among Kenyan HIV-infected pregnant women and was associated
      with higher plasma HIV levels, but was not associated with perinatal transmission
      of HIV.
FAU - Roxby, Alison C
AU  - Roxby AC
AD  - Departments of Medicine.
AD  - Departments of Global Health.
AD  - Departments of Epidemiology.
FAU - Yuhas, Krista
AU  - Yuhas K
AD  - Departments of Global Health.
AD  - Departments of Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer
      Research Center, Seattle, WA.
FAU - Farquhar, Carey
AU  - Farquhar C
AD  - Departments of Medicine.
AD  - Departments of Global Health.
AD  - Departments of Epidemiology.
FAU - Bosire, Rose
AU  - Bosire R
AD  - Departments of Centre for Public Health Research, Kenya Medical Research
      Institute (KEMRI), Nairobi, Kenya.
FAU - Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy
AU  - Mbori-Ngacha D
AD  - Departments of UNICEF, New York, NY.
FAU - Richardson, Barbra A
AU  - Richardson BA
AD  - Departments of Global Health.
AD  - Departments of Biostatistics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
AD  - Departments of Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer
      Research Center, Seattle, WA.
FAU - Totten, Patricia A
AU  - Totten PA
AD  - Departments of Medicine.
AD  - Departments of Global Health.
FAU - John-Stewart, Grace
AU  - John-Stewart G
AD  - Departments of Medicine.
AD  - Departments of Global Health.
AD  - Departments of Epidemiology.
AD  - Departments of Pediatrics.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190802
PL  - England
TA  - AIDS
JT  - AIDS (London, England)
JID - 8710219
SB  - IM
SB  - X
EDAT- 2019/08/07 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/07 06:00
CRDT- 2019/08/07 06:00
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002335 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - AIDS. 2019 Aug 2. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002335.

PMID- 31385862
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190806
IS  - 1473-5571 (Electronic)
IS  - 0269-9370 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Aug 2
TI  - Serious clinical events in HIV-positive persons with chronic kidney disease
      (CKD).
LID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002331 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVES: Predictors of chronic kidney disease (CKD) amongst HIV-positive
      persons are well established, but insights into the prognosis after CKD including
      the role of modifiable risk factors are limited. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study
      METHODS:: D:A:D participants developing CKD (confirmed, >3 months apart, eGFR </=
      60 mL/min/1.73 m or 25% eGFR decrease when eGFR </= 60) were followed to incident
      serious clinical events (SCE); end stage renal (ESRD) and liver disease,
      cardiovascular disease (CVD), AIDS- and non-AIDS defining malignancies (NADM),
      other AIDS or death, 6 months after last visit or 02.01.2016. Poisson regression 
      models considered associations between SCE and modifiable risk factors. RESULTS: 
      During 2.7 (IQR 1.1-5.1) years median follow-up 595 persons with CKD (24.1%)
      developed a SCE (incidence rate 68.9/1000 PYFU [95%CI 63.4-74.4]) with 8.3%
      [6.9-9.0] estimated to experience any SCE at one year. The most common SCE was
      death (12.7%), followed by NADM (5.8%), CVD (5.6%), other AIDS (5.0%) and ESRD
      (2.9%). Crude SCE ratios were significantly higher in those with vs. without CKD,
      strongest for ESRD (65.9 [43.8-100.9]) and death (4.8 [4.3-5.3]). Smoking was
      consistently associated with all CKD-related SCE. Diabetes predicted CVD, NADM
      and death, while dyslipidaemia was only significantly associated with CVD. Poor
      HIV-status predicted other AIDS and death, eGFR < 30 mL/min/1.73m predicted CVD
      and death and low BMI predicted other AIDS and death. CONCLUSION: In an era where
      many HIV-positive persons require less monitoring due to efficient antiretroviral
      treatment, persons with CKD carry a high burden of SCE. Several potentially
      modifiable risk factors play a central role for CKD-related morbidity and
      mortality.
FAU - Ryom, Lene
AU  - Ryom L
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases, CHIP, Section 2100, Rigshospitalet, University
      of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
FAU - Lundgren, Jens D
AU  - Lundgren JD
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases, CHIP, Section 2100, Rigshospitalet, University
      of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
FAU - Law, Matthew
AU  - Law M
AD  - The Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
FAU - Kirk, Ole
AU  - Kirk O
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases, CHIP, Section 2100, Rigshospitalet, University
      of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
FAU - El-Sadr, Wafaa
AU  - El-Sadr W
AD  - ICAP-Columbia University and Harlem Hospital, New York, USA.
FAU - Bonnet, Fabrice
AU  - Bonnet F
AD  - Universite Bordeaux, INSERM U 897, CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
FAU - Weber, Rainer
AU  - Weber R
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases and Hospital Epidemiology, University Hospital
      Zurich, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
FAU - Fontas, Eric
AU  - Fontas E
AD  - Public Health department, CHU Nice, Nice, France.
FAU - Monforte, Antonella D'armino
AU  - Monforte AD
AD  - Dipartimento di Scienze della Salute, Clinica di Malattie Infectitive e
      Tropicali, Azienda Ospedaliera-Polo Universitario San Paolo, Milan, Italy.
FAU - Phillips, Andrew
AU  - Phillips A
AD  - Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME),
      Institute for Global Health, UCL, London, United Kingdom.
FAU - Reiss, Peter
AU  - Reiss P
AD  - Amsterdam University Medical Centers (location AMC), Department of Global Health 
      and Div. of Infectious Diseases, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The
      Netherlands.
AD  - HIV Monitoring Foundation, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
FAU - de Wit, Stephane
AU  - de Wit S
AD  - CHU Saint-Pierre, Department of Infectious Diseases, Brussels, Belgium.
FAU - Hatleberg, Camilla Ingrid
AU  - Hatleberg CI
AD  - Department of Infectious Diseases, CHIP, Section 2100, Rigshospitalet, University
      of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
FAU - Sabin, Caroline
AU  - Sabin C
AD  - Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME),
      Institute for Global Health, UCL, London, United Kingdom.
FAU - Mocroft, Amanda
AU  - Mocroft A
AD  - Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME),
      Institute for Global Health, UCL, London, United Kingdom.
CN  - D:A:D study group
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190802
PL  - England
TA  - AIDS
JT  - AIDS (London, England)
JID - 8710219
SB  - IM
SB  - X
EDAT- 2019/08/07 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/07 06:00
CRDT- 2019/08/07 06:00
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002331 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - AIDS. 2019 Aug 2. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002331.

PMID- 31392892
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190808
IS  - 1931-8405 (Electronic)
IS  - 0889-2229 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Aug 8
TI  - HIV DNA measurement and improved detection of HIV infection among MSM: a
      strategic implication.
LID - 10.1089/AID.2019.0091 [doi]
AB  - Rapid test (RT) is the principal screening method in the human immunodeficiency
      virus (HIV) control practice. However, this method may lead to inaccurate
      detection, primarily due to the more than 4 weeks' window phase. In the present
      study, we performed a HIV DNA screening method to show its application prospects 
      in men who have sex with men (MSM). From July 2017 to April 2018, we recruited
      1301 MSM from Beijing who were not previously diagnosed as HIV positive. Both HIV
      DNA detection and RT were performed. In total, 141 and 135 HIV positive results
      were detected by DNA detection and RT, respectively. By repetitive and
      confirmative tests (western blot), we verified that DNA detection detected 10
      more true positives than RT and 4 false positives were corrected from RT. This
      represents 14 inaccurate RT results that were corrected by DNA measurement.
      Therefore, DNA measurement should be fully considered as a screening method in
      the detection of HIV among MSM in the future.
FAU - Chen, Kai
AU  - Chen K
AD  - National Center for AIDS/STD Control and Prevention, China CDC, Beijing, China;
      kaichencool@163.com.
FAU - Wang, Yuehua
AU  - Wang Y
AD  - National Center for AIDS/STD Control and Prevention, China CDC, Beijing, China;
      383445472@qq.com.
FAU - He, Xiaoxia
AU  - He X
AD  - National Center for AIDS/STD Control and Prevention, China CDC, Beijing, Beijing,
      China; 124945608@qq.com.
FAU - Yao, Jun
AU  - Yao J
AD  - National Center for AIDS/STD Control and Prevention, China CDC, Beijing, China;
      yaojun@chinaaids.cn.
FAU - Xia, Dongyan
AU  - Xia D
AD  - Beijing Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China; hbxdy@126.com.
FAU - Lu, Hongyan
AU  - Lu H
AD  - Beijing Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Institute for AIDS/STD Control
      and Prevention, No.16 HePingLi Middle Street,Dongcheng District, Beijing, China, 
      100013; hongyan_lu@sina.com.
FAU - Jiang, Yan
AU  - Jiang Y
AD  - National Center for AIDS/STD Control and Prevention, China CDC, Beijing, China;
      jiangyan@chinaaids.cn.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190808
PL  - United States
TA  - AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses
JT  - AIDS research and human retroviruses
JID - 8709376
SB  - IM
SB  - X
EDAT- 2019/08/09 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/09 06:00
CRDT- 2019/08/09 06:00
PHST- 2019/08/09 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/08/09 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/09 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1089/AID.2019.0091 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 2019 Aug 8. doi: 10.1089/AID.2019.0091.

PMID- 31382762
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190806
IS  - 1931-8405 (Electronic)
IS  - 0889-2229 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Aug 6
TI  - Prevalence of Subclinical Atherosclerosis and Risk of Atherosclerotic
      Cardiovascular Disease in Older Adults Living with HIV.
LID - 10.1089/AID.2019.0023 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is one among leading causes of mortality in
      people living with HIV on antiretroviral treatment (ART) worldwide. We examined
      the prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis, associated factors, and risk of
      cardiovascular disease in older adults living with HIV(OALHIV). METHODS: A
      cross-sectional study in patients aged >/= 50 years with HIV infection receiving 
      ART at community hospitals in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Age- and sex-matched patients
      without documented HIV-infection who visited the general outpatient department
      were enrolled for comparison. Cardio-ankle vascular index(CAVI) and
      ankle-brachial index(ABI) were measured using the vascular screening system,
      VaSera SystemTM (Fukuda Denshi Co., ltd., Japan) to determine subclinical
      atherosclerosis (defined as CAVI >/= 9.0) and peripheral arterial disease
      (defined as ABI < 0.9), respectively. The Ramathibodi-Electric Generating
      Authority of Thailand (RAMA-EGAT) score to predict the risk of coronary stenosis 
      and the 10-year risk for ASCVD by pooled cohort equation were calculated.
      RESULTS: 155 patients were enrolled (107 HIV/ 48 comparison). The mean age was
      59.0 years (SD 6.1); 67 (43%) were male. Participants in the HIV and comparison
      group were similar with respect to abnormal CAVI (57% vs. 58%, p=0.88), abnormal 
      ABI (6% vs 8%, p=0.50), and the risk of coronary stenosis (34% vs 44%, p=0.23).
      However, the 10-year risk of ASCVD was lower in HIV than the comparison group
      (29% vs. 48%, p=0.02). In OALHIV, diabetes mellitus was the only factor
      associated with abnormal CAVI. CONCLUSIONS: The cardiovascular risk of OALHIV in 
      this study was similar to non-HIV population. More than a half of them had
      abnormal CAVI, and approximately one-third was at >/= 10% 10-year risk of ASCVD.
FAU - Aurpibul, LInda
AU  - Aurpibul L
AD  - Chiang Mai University, 26682, Research Institute for Health Sciences, Chiang Mai,
      Thailand; lindaa@rihes.org.
FAU - Srithanaviboonchai, Kriengkrai
AU  - Srithanaviboonchai K
AD  - Chiang Mai University, 26682, Research Institute for Health Sciences, Chiang Mai,
      Thailand.
AD  - Chiang Mai University, 26682, Faculty of medicine, Chiang Mai, Thailand;
      ksrithanaviboonchai@gmail.com.
FAU - Rerkasem, Kittipan
AU  - Rerkasem K
AD  - Chiang Mai University, 26682, Research Institute for Health Sciences, Chiang Mai,
      Thailand.
AD  - Chiang Mai University, 26682, Faculty of medicine, Chiang Mai, Thailand;
      rerkase@gmail.com.
FAU - Tangmunkongvorakul, Arunrat
AU  - Tangmunkongvorakul A
AD  - Chiang Mai University, 26682, Research Institute for Health Sciences, Chiang Mai,
      United States; arunrat@rihes.org.
FAU - Sitthi, Wathee
AU  - Sitthi W
AD  - Chiang Mai University, 26682, Research Institute for Health Sciences, Chiang Mai,
      Thailand; wathee@rihes.org.
FAU - Musumari, Patou Masika
AU  - Musumari PM
AD  - Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine Department of Public Health, 222815,
      Department of Global Health and Socio-epidemiology, Kyoto, Japan;
      patoumus@yahoo.fr.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190806
PL  - United States
TA  - AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses
JT  - AIDS research and human retroviruses
JID - 8709376
SB  - IM
SB  - X
EDAT- 2019/08/07 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/07 06:00
CRDT- 2019/08/07 06:00
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1089/AID.2019.0023 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 2019 Aug 6. doi: 10.1089/AID.2019.0023.

PMID- 31379191
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190805
IS  - 1931-8405 (Electronic)
IS  - 0889-2229 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Aug 4
TI  - Perspectives from the Front Lines: Encouraging Community Engagement in the
      Performance of Research at the Intersection of HIV and Aging.
LID - 10.1089/AID.2019.0122 [doi]
AB  - In this letter we advocate for greater inclusion of community members in the
      performance of research at the intersection of HIV and aging.
FAU - Karris, Maile
AU  - Karris M
AD  - University of California San Diego, 8784, Medicine, San Diego, California, United
      States; m1young@ucsd.edu.
FAU - Baker, Doris
AU  - Baker D
AD  - Johns Hopkins University, 1466, Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, United States;
      dbaker4@jhu.edu.
FAU - Berry, J Michael
AU  - Berry JM
AD  - Test Positive Aware Network, Chicago, United States; Jmichael.Berry@ucsf.edu.
FAU - Brown, Brandon
AU  - Brown B
AD  - University of California Riverside, 8790, Riverside, California, United States;
      brandon.brown@medsch.ucr.edu.
FAU - Karpiak, Stephen
AU  - Karpiak S
AD  - AIDS Community Research Initiative of America , New York , United States;
      stephenk@gmhc.org.
FAU - Levin, Jules
AU  - Levin J
AD  - National AIDS Treatment Advocacy Project, 33646, New York, New York, United
      States; jules@natap.org.
FAU - Reese, Melanie
AU  - Reese M
AD  - Older Women Embracing Life , Baltimore, Maryland, United States;
      me2umar@gmail.com.
FAU - Sharp, Matthew
AU  - Sharp M
AD  - The Reunion Project, Berkeley, California, United States;
      mattsharpster@gmail.com.
FAU - Taylor, Jeff
AU  - Taylor J
AD  - HIV + Aging Research Project, Palm Springs , California, United States;
      jefftaylorps@gmail.com.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190804
PL  - United States
TA  - AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses
JT  - AIDS research and human retroviruses
JID - 8709376
SB  - IM
SB  - X
EDAT- 2019/08/06 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/06 06:00
CRDT- 2019/08/06 06:00
PHST- 2019/08/06 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/08/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/06 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1089/AID.2019.0122 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 2019 Aug 4. doi: 10.1089/AID.2019.0122.

PMID- 31379187
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190805
IS  - 1931-8405 (Electronic)
IS  - 0889-2229 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Aug 4
TI  - Veterans Aging Cohort Study Index as a Marker of Bone Disease in HIV-Infected
      Patients.
LID - 10.1089/AID.2019.0155 [doi]
AB  - Background People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have
      higher risk of low bone mineral density (BMD) and fragility fracture than general
      population. The aim of our retrospective study was to explore if HIV specific
      Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) Index and its specific components could help
      identify patients at risk for low BMD. METHODS: 195 HIV-infected patients with
      DXA scan between 2007 - 2014 were included and DXA scan results were used to
      classify patients with osteopenia. VACS Index was calculated for all patients
      using laboratory values closest to the date of DXA scan. Logistic regression was 
      used to assess the association between VACS Index score or individual components 
      of VACS Index with the presence of low BMD after adjusting for confounding
      variables. RESULTS: 109 (56%) patients were diagnosed with low BMD. VACS Index
      score was significantly associated with low BMD, with the odds of low BMD
      increasing 1.21 times for each 10 unit increase in VACS Index score (95%
      confidence interval [CI], 1.03, 1.42; p=0.02). The two groups differed
      significantly on patient weights, proportion of white patients and Hepatitis C
      co-infected patients. After adjusting for white race and weight, Hepatitis C
      coinfection was significantly associated with increased risk of low BMD (OR,
      24.4; 95% CI, 7.45-80.16). CONCLUSION: VACS Index score, previously demonstrated 
      to be a marker of frailty in HIV infected patients; is significantly associated
      with risk of low BMD and could be used to develop a prediction tool to screen for
      low BMD in resource limited setting where DXA scans are not easily available.
FAU - Shahani, Lokesh
AU  - Shahani L
AD  - University of Texas John P and Katherine G McGovern Medical School Department of 
      Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 144383, 1941 East Road, Houston, Texas,
      United States, 77030-3406; lokesh.r.shahani@uth.tmc.edu.
FAU - Breaux, Katharine
AU  - Breaux K
AD  - Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center and Baylor Unviersity School of Medicine,
      Houston, Texas, United States; katherine.breaux@va.gov.
FAU - Lin, Michael
AU  - Lin M
AD  - Baylor College of Medicine, 3989, Houston, Texas, United States; mlin@bcm.edu.
FAU - Marcelli, Marco
AU  - Marcelli M
AD  - Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center and Baylor Unviersity School of Medicine,
      Houston, Texas, United States; marco.marcelli@va.gov.
FAU - Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria
AU  - Rodriguez-Barradas M
AD  - Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center and Baylor Unviersity School of Medicine,
      Houston, Texas, United States; maria.Rodriguez-Barradas2@va.gov.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190804
PL  - United States
TA  - AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses
JT  - AIDS research and human retroviruses
JID - 8709376
SB  - IM
SB  - X
EDAT- 2019/08/06 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/06 06:00
CRDT- 2019/08/06 06:00
PHST- 2019/08/06 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/08/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/06 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1089/AID.2019.0155 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 2019 Aug 4. doi: 10.1089/AID.2019.0155.

PMID- 31389026
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190821
IS  - 1096-9071 (Electronic)
IS  - 0146-6615 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Aug 7
TI  - Antiviral activity of HIV-1 integrase strand-transfer inhibitors against mutants 
      with integrase resistance-associated mutations and their frequency in
      treatment-naive individuals.
LID - 10.1002/jmv.25564 [doi]
AB  - The development of resistance to human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) integrase
      strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTI) has been documented; however, knowledge of the
      impact of pre-existing integrase (IN) mutations on INSTI resistance (INSTI-R) is 
      still evolving. The frequency of HIV-1 IN mutations in 2177 treatment-naive
      subjects was investigated, along with the INSTI susceptibility of site-directed
      mutant viruses containing major and minor INSTI-R mutations. Total 6 of 39 minor 
      INSTI-R mutations (M50I, S119P/G/T/R, and E157Q) were found in >1% of
      IN-treatment-naive subjects with no impact on INSTI susceptibility. When each
      combined with major INSTI-R mutation, M50I, S119P, and E157Q led to decreased
      susceptibility to elvitegravir but remained sensitive to dolutegravir and
      bictegravir.
CI  - (c) 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
FAU - Margot, Nicolas A
AU  - Margot NA
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0911-4237
AD  - Gilead Sciences, Inc., Clinical virology, Foster City, California.
FAU - Ram, Renee R
AU  - Ram RR
AD  - Gilead Sciences, Inc., Clinical virology, Foster City, California.
FAU - White, Kirsten L
AU  - White KL
AD  - Gilead Sciences, Inc., Clinical virology, Foster City, California.
FAU - Abram, Michael E
AU  - Abram ME
AD  - Gilead Sciences, Inc., Clinical virology, Foster City, California.
FAU - Callebaut, Christian
AU  - Callebaut C
AD  - Gilead Sciences, Inc., Clinical virology, Foster City, California.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190807
PL  - United States
TA  - J Med Virol
JT  - Journal of medical virology
JID - 7705876
SB  - IM
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - HIV-1
OT  - INSTI-resistance
OT  - bictegravir
OT  - dolutegravir
OT  - elvitegravir
OT  - integrase strand-transfer inhibitor
OT  - raltegravir
EDAT- 2019/08/08 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/08 06:00
CRDT- 2019/08/08 06:00
PHST- 2019/05/01 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/07/31 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/08/08 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/08 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/08/08 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1002/jmv.25564 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - J Med Virol. 2019 Aug 7. doi: 10.1002/jmv.25564.

PMID- 31391272
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190808
IS  - 1098-5514 (Electronic)
IS  - 0022-538X (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Aug 7
TI  - Strain-dependent Activation and Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus
      (HIV-1) Entry by a Specific PF-68742 Stereoisomer.
LID - JVI.01197-19 [pii]
LID - 10.1128/JVI.01197-19 [doi]
AB  - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) entry into cells is mediated by the viral
      envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer, which consists of three gp120 exterior
      glycoproteins and three gp41 transmembrane glycoproteins. When gp120 binds
      sequentially to the receptors, CD4 and CCR5, on the target cell, the metastable
      Env trimer is triggered to undergo entry-related conformational changes. PF-68742
      is a small molecule that inhibits the infection of a subset of HIV-1 strains by
      interfering with an Env function other than receptor binding. Determinants of
      HIV-1 resistance to PF-68742 map to the disulfide loop and fusion peptide of
      gp41. Of the four possible PF-68742 stereoisomers, only one, MF275, inhibited the
      infection of CD4-positive, CCR5-positive cells by some HIV-1 strains. MF275
      inhibition of these HIV-1 strains occurred after CD4 binding, but before the
      formation of the gp41 six-helix bundle. Unexpectedly, MF275 activated the
      infection of CD4-negative, CCR5-positive cells by several HIV-1 strains resistant
      to the inhibitory effects of the compound in CD4-positive target cells. In
      contrast to CD4 complementation by CD4-mimetic compounds, activation of
      CD4-independent infection by MF275 did not depend upon the availability of the
      gp120 Phe 43 cavity. Sensitivity to inhibitors indicates that MF275-activated
      virus entry requires formation/exposure of the gp41 heptad repeat (HR1) as well
      as CCR5 binding. MF275 apparently activates a virus entry pathway parallel to
      that triggered by CD4 and CD4-mimetic compounds. Strain-dependent divergence in
      Env conformational transitions allows different outcomes, inhibition or
      activation, in response to MF275. Understanding the mechanisms of MF275 activity 
      should assist efforts to optimize its utility. IMPORTANCE Envelope glycoprotein
      (Env) spikes on the surface of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) bind target
      cell receptors, triggering changes in the shape of Env. We studied a small
      molecule, MF275, that also induced shape changes in Env. The consequences of
      MF275 interaction with Env depended on the HIV-1 strain, with infection by some
      viruses inhibited and infection by other viruses enhanced. These studies reveal
      the strain-dependent diversity of HIV-1 Envs as they undergo shape changes in
      proceeding down the entry pathway. Appreciation of this diversity will assist
      attempts to develop broadly active inhibitors of HIV-1 entry.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2019 American Society for Microbiology.
FAU - Zhao, Connie
AU  - Zhao C
AD  - Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute,
      Boston, MA 02215.
FAU - Princiotto, Amy M
AU  - Princiotto AM
AD  - Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute,
      Boston, MA 02215.
FAU - Nguyen, Hanh T
AU  - Nguyen HT
AD  - Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute,
      Boston, MA 02215.
FAU - Zou, Shitao
AU  - Zou S
AD  - Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute,
      Boston, MA 02215.
FAU - Zhao, Meiqing Lily
AU  - Zhao ML
AD  - Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute,
      Boston, MA 02215.
FAU - Zhang, Shijian
AU  - Zhang S
AD  - Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute,
      Boston, MA 02215.
FAU - Herschhorn, Alon
AU  - Herschhorn A
AD  - Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute,
      Boston, MA 02215.
AD  - Department of Microbiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115.
AD  - Division of Infectious Diseases and International Medicine, Department of
      Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
FAU - Farrell, Mark
AU  - Farrell M
AD  - Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
FAU - Pahil, Karanbir
AU  - Pahil K
AD  - Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
FAU - Melillo, Bruno
AU  - Melillo B
AD  - Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
FAU - Sambasivarao, Somisetti V
AU  - Sambasivarao SV
AD  - Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Drexel University,
      Philadelphia, PA 19104.
FAU - Abrams, Cameron
AU  - Abrams C
AD  - Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Drexel University,
      Philadelphia, PA 19104.
FAU - Smith, Amos B 3rd
AU  - Smith AB 3rd
AD  - Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
FAU - Madani, Navid
AU  - Madani N
AD  - Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute,
      Boston, MA 02215.
AD  - Department of Microbiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115.
FAU - Sodroski, Joseph
AU  - Sodroski J
AD  - Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute,
      Boston, MA 02215 joseph_sodroski@dfci.harvard.edu.
AD  - Department of Microbiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115.
AD  - Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard T. H. Chan School of
      Public Health, Boston, MA 02215.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190807
PL  - United States
TA  - J Virol
JT  - Journal of virology
JID - 0113724
SB  - IM
EDAT- 2019/08/09 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/09 06:00
CRDT- 2019/08/09 06:00
PHST- 2019/08/09 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/08/09 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/09 06:00 [medline]
AID - JVI.01197-19 [pii]
AID - 10.1128/JVI.01197-19 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - J Virol. 2019 Aug 7. pii: JVI.01197-19. doi: 10.1128/JVI.01197-19.

PMID- 31391270
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190808
IS  - 1098-5514 (Electronic)
IS  - 0022-538X (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Aug 7
TI  - Attenuation of equine lentivirus alters mitochondrial protein expression profile 
      from inflammation to apoptosis.
LID - JVI.00653-19 [pii]
LID - 10.1128/JVI.00653-19 [doi]
AB  - Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is an equine lentivirus similar to HIV-1,
      targets to host immune cells and causes life-long infection in horses. The
      Chinese live EIAV vaccine is attenuated from long-term passaging of a high
      virulent strain in vitro The parent pathogenic strain (EIAVDLV34) induces a host 
      inflammatory storm to cause severe pathological injury of animals. However, the
      vaccine strain (EIAVDLV121) induces a high level of apoptosis to eliminate the
      infected cells. To investigate how these processes are regulated, we performed a 
      comparative proteomics analysis and functional study in equine monocyte-derived
      macrophages (eMDMs), and found that divergent mitochondrial protein expression
      profiles caused by EIAV strains with different virulence lead to disparate
      mitochondrial function, morphology and metabolism. This in turn promoted distinct
      transformation of macrophage inflammatory polarization and intrinsic apoptosis.
      In EIAVDLV34 infected cells, a high level of glycolysis and increased
      mitochondrial fragmentation were induced, resulting in M1-polarized
      pro-inflammatory type transformation of macrophages and subsequently producing a 
      strong inflammatory response. Following infection with EIAVDLV121, the infected
      cells were transformed into M2-polarized anti-inflammatory macrophages by
      inhibition of glycolysis. In this case, decrease of mitochondrial membrane
      potential and impairment of electronic respiratory chain led to increased levels 
      of apoptosis and ROS. These results are correlated with the viral pathogenicity
      loss and may help to understand the key mechanism of lentiviral
      attenuation.IMPORTANCEFollowing viral infection, the working pattern and function
      of the cell can be transformed through the impact on mitochondria. It still
      unknown how mitochondrial response changes in the cells infected with viruses in 
      the process of virulence attenuation. EIAVDLV121 is the only effective lentiviral
      vaccine for large-scale use in world. EIAVDLV34 is a parent pathogenic strain.
      Unlike EIAVDLV34-induced inflammation storms, EIAVDLV121 can induce high levels
      of apoptosis. For the first time, we found that, after altering mitochondrial
      protein expression profile, EIAVDLV34 infected cells are transformed into
      M1-polarized type macrophages to cause inflammatory injury and the intrinsic
      apoptosis pathway is activated in EIAVDLV121 infected cells. These studies shed
      light on how the mitochondrial protein expression profile change from cells
      infected by pathogenic or attenuated lentivirus strains to drive different
      cellular response, especially from inflammation to apoptosis.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2019 American Society for Microbiology.
FAU - Du, Cheng
AU  - Du C
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Harbin Veterinary Research
      Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin, China.
FAU - Duan, Yingyi
AU  - Duan Y
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Harbin Veterinary Research
      Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin, China.
FAU - Wang, Xuefeng
AU  - Wang X
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Harbin Veterinary Research
      Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin, China.
FAU - Lin, Yuezhi
AU  - Lin Y
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Harbin Veterinary Research
      Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin, China.
FAU - Na, Lei
AU  - Na L
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Harbin Veterinary Research
      Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin, China.
FAU - Wang, Xinhui
AU  - Wang X
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Harbin Veterinary Research
      Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin, China.
FAU - Chen, Kewei
AU  - Chen K
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Harbin Veterinary Research
      Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin, China.
FAU - Wang, Xiaojun
AU  - Wang X
AD  - State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Harbin Veterinary Research
      Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin, China.
      wangxiaojun@caas.cn.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190807
PL  - United States
TA  - J Virol
JT  - Journal of virology
JID - 0113724
SB  - IM
EDAT- 2019/08/09 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/09 06:00
CRDT- 2019/08/09 06:00
PHST- 2019/08/09 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/08/09 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/09 06:00 [medline]
AID - JVI.00653-19 [pii]
AID - 10.1128/JVI.00653-19 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - J Virol. 2019 Aug 7. pii: JVI.00653-19. doi: 10.1128/JVI.00653-19.

PMID- 30792284
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190806
LR  - 20190806
IS  - 1095-9203 (Electronic)
IS  - 0036-8075 (Linking)
VI  - 363
IP  - 6429
DP  - 2019 Feb 22
TI  - Unexpected drug emerges for stroke recovery.
PG  - 805
LID - 10.1126/science.363.6429.805 [doi]
FAU - Servick, Kelly
AU  - Servick K
LA  - eng
PT  - News
PL  - United States
TA  - Science
JT  - Science (New York, N.Y.)
JID - 0404511
RN  - 0 (CCR5 Receptor Antagonists)
RN  - 0 (HIV Fusion Inhibitors)
RN  - 0 (Receptors, CCR5)
RN  - MD6P741W8A (Maraviroc)
MH  - CCR5 Receptor Antagonists/*therapeutic use
MH  - HIV Fusion Inhibitors/*therapeutic use
MH  - Humans
MH  - Maraviroc/*therapeutic use
MH  - *Molecular Targeted Therapy
MH  - Receptors, CCR5/metabolism
MH  - Recovery of Function
MH  - Stroke/*drug therapy
MH  - *Stroke Rehabilitation
EDAT- 2019/02/23 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/07 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/23 06:00
PHST- 2019/02/23 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/02/23 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [medline]
AID - 363/6429/805 [pii]
AID - 10.1126/science.363.6429.805 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Science. 2019 Feb 22;363(6429):805. doi: 10.1126/science.363.6429.805.

PMID- 30765546
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190801
LR  - 20190801
IS  - 1095-9203 (Electronic)
IS  - 0036-8075 (Linking)
VI  - 363
IP  - 6428
DP  - 2019 Feb 15
TI  - AIDS push gets mixed reviews.
PG  - 680
LID - 10.1126/science.363.6428.680 [doi]
FAU - Cohen, Jon
AU  - Cohen J
LA  - eng
PT  - News
PL  - United States
TA  - Science
JT  - Science (New York, N.Y.)
JID - 0404511
MH  - Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/*prevention & control
MH  - Disease Eradication/*economics/*methods
MH  - Federal Government
MH  - Humans
MH  - United States
EDAT- 2019/02/16 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/02 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/16 06:00
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/02/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/02 06:00 [medline]
AID - 363/6428/680 [pii]
AID - 10.1126/science.363.6428.680 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Science. 2019 Feb 15;363(6428):680. doi: 10.1126/science.363.6428.680.

PMID- 31394407
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190820
IS  - 1096-0341 (Electronic)
IS  - 0042-6822 (Linking)
VI  - 536
DP  - 2019 Jul 30
TI  - Expression of PD-1 and PD-Ls in Kaposi's sarcoma and regulation by oncogenic
      herpesvirus lytic reactivation.
PG  - 16-19
LID - S0042-6822(19)30200-4 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.virol.2019.07.024 [doi]
AB  - Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) causes several cancers such as
      Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). PD-1/PD-Ls immune
      checkpoint molecules play important roles in cancer cell immune escape. The
      expression of PD-1/PD-Ls and their regulation by oncogenic viruses, in particular
      KSHV, remain largely undefined. Here we demonstrate strong PD-1/PD-L1/PD-L2
      expression in KS tissues from a cohort of HIV + patients. We found that induction
      of KSHV lytic reactivation significantly upregulates PD-L1 expression on infected
      tumor cells, potentially through several major cellular signaling pathways and
      IL-1beta, which may represent a novel mechanism for virus-associated tumor cell
      immune escape.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Chen, Jungang
AU  - Chen J
AD  - Departments of Pathology, Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute, University of
      Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W Markham St, Little Rock, AR, 72205, USA.
FAU - Del Valle, Luis
AU  - Del Valle L
AD  - Departments of Pathology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center,
      Louisiana Cancer Research Center, 1700 Tulane Ave, New Orleans, LA, 70112, USA.
FAU - Lin, Hui-Yi
AU  - Lin HY
AD  - Departments of Biostatistics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 
      Louisiana Cancer Research Center, 1700 Tulane Ave, New Orleans, LA, 70112, USA.
FAU - Plaisance-Bonstaff, Karlie
AU  - Plaisance-Bonstaff K
AD  - Departments of Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center,
      Louisiana Cancer Research Center, 1700 Tulane Ave, New Orleans, LA, 70112, USA.
FAU - Forrest, J Craig
AU  - Forrest JC
AD  - Microbiology & Immunology, Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute, University
      of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W Markham St, Little Rock, AR, 72205, USA.
FAU - Post, Steven R
AU  - Post SR
AD  - Departments of Pathology, Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute, University of
      Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W Markham St, Little Rock, AR, 72205, USA.
FAU - Qin, Zhiqiang
AU  - Qin Z
AD  - Departments of Pathology, Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute, University of
      Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W Markham St, Little Rock, AR, 72205, USA.
      Electronic address: zqin@uams.edu.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190730
PL  - United States
TA  - Virology
JT  - Virology
JID - 0110674
SB  - IM
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - KSHV
OT  - Kaposi's sarcoma
OT  - PD-1
OT  - PD-L1
OT  - PD-L2
EDAT- 2019/08/09 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/09 06:00
CRDT- 2019/08/09 06:00
PHST- 2019/05/14 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/06/26 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2019/07/29 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/08/09 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/09 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/08/09 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0042-6822(19)30200-4 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.virol.2019.07.024 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Virology. 2019 Jul 30;536:16-19. doi: 10.1016/j.virol.2019.07.024.

PMID- 31383646
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190808
LR  - 20190808
IS  - 1756-1833 (Electronic)
IS  - 0959-8138 (Linking)
VI  - 366
DP  - 2019 Aug 5
TI  - Unmasking the vulnerabilities of uninfected children exposed to HIV.
PG  - l4479
LID - 10.1136/bmj.l4479 [doi]
FAU - Ramokolo, Vundli
AU  - Ramokolo V
AD  - Health Systems Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council, South
      Africa vundli.ramokolo@mrc.ac.za.
FAU - Goga, Ameena E
AU  - Goga AE
AD  - Health Systems Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council, South
      Africa.
AD  - Department of Paediatrics, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
AD  - HIV Prevention Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council, South
      Africa.
FAU - Slogrove, Amy L
AU  - Slogrove AL
AD  - Department of Paediatrics and Child Health and Ukwanda Centre for Rural Health,
      Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Worcester,
      South Africa.
FAU - Powis, Kathleen M
AU  - Powis KM
AD  - Massachusetts General Hospital, Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, USA.
AD  - Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Department of Immunology and Infectious
      Diseases, USA.
AD  - Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership, Gaborone, Botswana.
LA  - eng
GR  - R21 HD093531/NICHD NIH HHS/National Institute of Child Health & Human
      Development/United States
GR  - K43 TW010683/FIC NIH HHS/Fogarty International Center/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT  - Comment
DEP - 20190805
PL  - England
TA  - BMJ
JT  - BMJ (Clinical research ed.)
JID - 8900488
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
CON - BMJ. 2019 Mar 26;364:l660. PMID: 30957768
CON - BMJ. 2019 Mar 26;364:l687. PMID: 30957782
CON - BMJ. 2019 Jun 6;365:l1965. PMID: 31171558
MH  - Africa South of the Sahara
MH  - Child
MH  - Female
MH  - HIV
MH  - Humans
MH  - *Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - *Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
COIS- Competing interests: We have read and understood BMJ policy on declaration of
      interests and declare no competing interests. This article was funded by the
      South African Medical Research Council and Unicef. Research reported in this
      publication was also supported by the Fogarty International Center of the
      National Institutes of Health under Award Number 1K43TW010683 to ALS and the
      Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
      under Award Number 1R21HD093531 to KMP. ALS receives salary support through the
      CIPHER Grantee Programme of the International AIDS Society (2017/518-SLO) while
      VR receives support from the SAMRC Intramural Postdoctoral Fellowship Programme. 
      The content of this paper is the sole responsibility of the authors and does not 
      necessarily represent the official views of the organisations and funders.
EDAT- 2019/08/07 06:00
MHDA- 2019/08/09 06:00
CRDT- 2019/08/07 06:00
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/08/07 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/08/09 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1136/bmj.l4479 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - BMJ. 2019 Aug 5;366:l4479. doi: 10.1136/bmj.l4479.