PMID- 30651274
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190329
LR  - 20190329
IS  - 1756-1833 (Electronic)
IS  - 0959-8138 (Linking)
VI  - 364
DP  - 2019 Jan 16
TI  - Authors' reply to Skovenborg and Manfredini and colleagues.
PG  - l179
LID - 10.1136/bmj.l179 [doi]
FAU - Shan, Zhilei
AU  - Shan Z
AD  - Department of Nutrition, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA
      02115, USA.
FAU - Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N
AU  - Bhupathiraju SN
AD  - Department of Nutrition, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA
      02115, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Letter
PT  - Comment
DEP - 20190116
PL  - England
TA  - BMJ
JT  - BMJ (Clinical research ed.)
JID - 8900488
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
CON - BMJ. 2019 Jan 16;364:l177. PMID: 30651233
CON - BMJ. 2019 Jan 16;364:l178. PMID: 30651292
MH  - Alcohol Drinking
MH  - *Diabetes Mellitus
MH  - Humans
MH  - Risk Factors
COIS- Competing interests: None declared.
EDAT- 2019/01/18 06:00
MHDA- 2019/03/30 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/18 06:00
PHST- 2019/01/18 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/01/18 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/03/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1136/bmj.l179 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - BMJ. 2019 Jan 16;364:l179. doi: 10.1136/bmj.l179.

PMID- 30559171
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190326
LR  - 20190326
IS  - 1756-1833 (Electronic)
IS  - 0959-8138 (Linking)
VI  - 363
DP  - 2018 Dec 17
TI  - Flash glucose monitoring devices: CCG criteria are incoherent.
PG  - k5203
LID - 10.1136/bmj.k5203 [doi]
FAU - Black, Stephen
AU  - Black S
AD  - Black Box Data Science, Biggleswade SG18 0QA, UK.
LA  - eng
PT  - Letter
PT  - Comment
DEP - 20181217
PL  - England
TA  - BMJ
JT  - BMJ (Clinical research ed.)
JID - 8900488
RN  - 0 (Blood Glucose)
RN  - IY9XDZ35W2 (Glucose)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
CON - BMJ. 2018 Nov 7;363:k4675. PMID: 30404909
MH  - Blood Glucose
MH  - Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring
MH  - *Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1
MH  - Glucose
MH  - Humans
MH  - *Hypoglycemia
COIS- Competing interests: SB is a self funding user of FreeStyle Libre.
EDAT- 2018/12/19 06:00
MHDA- 2019/03/27 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/19 06:00
PHST- 2018/12/19 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/12/19 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/03/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1136/bmj.k5203 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - BMJ. 2018 Dec 17;363:k5203. doi: 10.1136/bmj.k5203.

PMID- 30463844
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190325
LR  - 20190325
IS  - 1756-1833 (Electronic)
IS  - 0959-8138 (Linking)
VI  - 363
DP  - 2018 Nov 21
TI  - Food sources of fructose-containing sugars and glycaemic control: systematic
      review and meta-analysis of controlled intervention studies.
PG  - k4644
LID - 10.1136/bmj.k4644 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of different food sources of fructose-containing 
      sugars on glycaemic control at different levels of energy control. DESIGN:
      Systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled intervention studies. DATA
      SOURCES: Medine, Embase, and the Cochrane Library up to 25 April 2018.
      ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR SELECTING STUDIES: Controlled intervention studies of at
      least seven days' duration and assessing the effect of different food sources of 
      fructose-containing sugars on glycaemic control in people with and without
      diabetes were included. Four study designs were prespecified on the basis of
      energy control: substitution studies (sugars in energy matched comparisons with
      other macronutrients), addition studies (excess energy from sugars added to
      diets), subtraction studies (energy from sugars subtracted from diets), and ad
      libitum studies (sugars freely replaced by other macronutrients without control
      for energy). Outcomes were glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose,
      and fasting blood glucose insulin. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Four
      independent reviewers extracted relevant data and assessed risk of bias. Data
      were pooled by random effects models and overall certainty of the evidence
      assessed by the GRADE approach (grading of recommendations assessment,
      development, and evaluation). RESULTS: 155 study comparisons (n=5086) were
      included. Total fructose-containing sugars had no harmful effect on any outcome
      in substitution or subtraction studies, with a decrease seen in HbA1c in
      substitution studies (mean difference -0.22% (95% confidence interval to -0.35%
      to -0.08%), -25.9 mmol/mol (-27.3 to -24.4)), but a harmful effect was seen on
      fasting insulin in addition studies (4.68 pmol/L (1.40 to 7.96)) and ad libitum
      studies (7.24 pmol/L (0.47 to 14.00)). There was interaction by food source, with
      specific food sources showing beneficial effects (fruit and fruit juice) or
      harmful effects (sweetened milk and mixed sources) in substitution studies and
      harmful effects (sugars-sweetened beverages and fruit juice) in addition studies 
      on at least one outcome. Most of the evidence was low quality. CONCLUSIONS:
      Energy control and food source appear to mediate the effect of
      fructose-containing sugars on glycaemic control. Although most food sources of
      these sugars (especially fruit) do not have a harmful effect in energy matched
      substitutions with other macronutrients, several food sources of
      fructose-containing sugars (especially sugars-sweetened beverages) adding excess 
      energy to diets have harmful effects. However, certainty in these estimates is
      low, and more high quality randomised controlled trials are needed. STUDY
      REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02716870).
CI  - Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not
      already granted under a licence) please go to
      http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
FAU - Choo, Vivian L
AU  - Choo VL
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract, and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical 
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St Michael's
      Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, ON, M5C 2T2, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, ON, Canada.
AD  - Undergraduate Medical Education, Cumming School of Medicine, University of
      Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
FAU - Viguiliouk, Effie
AU  - Viguiliouk E
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract, and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical 
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St Michael's
      Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, ON, M5C 2T2, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, ON, Canada.
FAU - Blanco Mejia, Sonia
AU  - Blanco Mejia S
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract, and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical 
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St Michael's
      Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, ON, M5C 2T2, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, ON, Canada.
FAU - Cozma, Adrian I
AU  - Cozma AI
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract, and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical 
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St Michael's
      Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, ON, M5C 2T2, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, ON, Canada.
AD  - Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, ON, Canada.
FAU - Khan, Tauseef A
AU  - Khan TA
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract, and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical 
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St Michael's
      Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, ON, M5C 2T2, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, ON, Canada.
FAU - Ha, Vanessa
AU  - Ha V
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract, and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical 
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St Michael's
      Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, ON, M5C 2T2, Canada.
AD  - Undergraduate Medical Education, School of Medicine, Queen's University,
      Kingston, ON, Canada.
AD  - Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University,
      Hamilton, ON, Canada.
FAU - Wolever, Thomas M S
AU  - Wolever TMS
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract, and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical 
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St Michael's
      Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, ON, M5C 2T2, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, ON, Canada.
AD  - Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, St Michael's
      Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
FAU - Leiter, Lawrence A
AU  - Leiter LA
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract, and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical 
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St Michael's
      Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, ON, M5C 2T2, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, ON, Canada.
AD  - Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, St Michael's
      Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
FAU - Vuksan, Vladimir
AU  - Vuksan V
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract, and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical 
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St Michael's
      Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, ON, M5C 2T2, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, ON, Canada.
AD  - Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, St Michael's
      Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
FAU - Kendall, Cyril W C
AU  - Kendall CWC
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract, and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical 
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St Michael's
      Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, ON, M5C 2T2, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, ON, Canada.
AD  - College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK,
      Canada.
FAU - de Souza, Russell J
AU  - de Souza RJ
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract, and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical 
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St Michael's
      Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, ON, M5C 2T2, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, ON, Canada.
AD  - Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University,
      Hamilton, ON, Canada.
FAU - Jenkins, David J A
AU  - Jenkins DJA
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract, and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical 
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St Michael's
      Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, ON, M5C 2T2, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, ON, Canada.
AD  - Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, St Michael's
      Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
FAU - Sievenpiper, John L
AU  - Sievenpiper JL
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract, and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical 
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St Michael's
      Hospital, 61 Queen Street East, Toronto, ON, M5C 2T2, Canada
      john.sievenpiper@utoronto.ca.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, ON, Canada.
AD  - Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, St Michael's
      Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
LA  - eng
SI  - ClinicalTrials.gov/NCT02716870
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Meta-Analysis
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT  - Systematic Review
DEP - 20181121
PL  - England
TA  - BMJ
JT  - BMJ (Clinical research ed.)
JID - 8900488
RN  - 0 (Blood Glucose)
RN  - 0 (Dietary Sugars)
RN  - 0 (Glycated Hemoglobin A)
RN  - 0 (High Fructose Corn Syrup)
RN  - 0 (Insulin)
RN  - 0 (hemoglobin A1c protein, human)
RN  - 30237-26-4 (Fructose)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Beverages
MH  - Blood Glucose/*metabolism
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*metabolism
MH  - *Dietary Sugars
MH  - Fasting
MH  - *Fructose
MH  - Fruit
MH  - Fruit and Vegetable Juices
MH  - Glycated Hemoglobin A/*metabolism
MH  - High Fructose Corn Syrup
MH  - Honey
MH  - Humans
MH  - Insulin/metabolism
PMC - PMC6247175
COIS- Competing interests: All authors have completed the ICMJE uniform disclosure form
      at www.icmje.org/coi_disclosure.pdf and declare: support from Diabetes Canada and
      the Diet, Digestive tract, and Disease Centre through the Canada Foundation for
      Innovation and the Ministry of Research and Innovation's Ontario Research Fund
      for the submitted work. TMSW is a part owner and president of Glycemic Index
      Laboratories, Toronto, Canada, and has authored several diet books on the
      glycaemic index for which he has received royalties from Phillipa Sandall
      Publishing Services and CABI Publishers; and has received consultant fees,
      honorariums, travel funding, or research support from or served on the scientific
      advisory board for Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canadian Diabetes
      Association, Dairy Farmers of Canada, McCain Foods, Temasek Polytechnic,
      Northwestern University, Royal Society of London, Glycemic Index Symbol
      programme, CreaNutrition AG, McMaster University, Canadian Society for
      Nutritional Sciences, National Sports and Conditioning Association, Faculty of
      Public Health and Nutrition-Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon, and Diabetes and
      Nutrition Study Group of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. VV
      has a Canadian (2 410 556) and American (7,326.404) patent on the medical use of 
      viscous fibre blend for reducing blood glucose for treatment of diabetes,
      increasing insulin sensitivity, and reduction in systolic blood pressure and
      blood lipids issued. CWCK has received grants or research support from the
      Advanced Food Materials Network, Agriculture and Agri-Foods Canada, Almond Board 
      of California, American Pistachio Growers, Barilla, Calorie Control Council,
      Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canola Council of Canada, International
      Nut and Dried Fruit Council, International Tree Nut Council Research and
      Education Foundation, Loblaw Brands, Pulse Canada, Saskatchewan Pulse Growers and
      Unilever; has received in-kind research support from the Almond Board of
      California, American Peanut Council, Barilla, California Walnut Commission,
      Kellogg Canada, Loblaw Companies, Quaker (PepsiCo), Primo, Unico, Unilever,
      WhiteWave Foods; has received travel support or honorariums from the American
      Peanut Council, American Pistachio Growers, Barilla, California Walnut
      Commission, Canola Council of Canada, General Mills, International Nut and Dried 
      Fruit Council, International Pasta Organization, Loblaw Brands Ltd, Nutrition
      Foundation of Italy, Oldways Preservation Trust, Paramount Farms, Peanut
      Institute, Pulse Canada, Sabra Dipping, Saskatchewan Pulse Growers, Sun-Maid,
      Tate & Lyle, Unilever and White Wave Foods; has served on the scientific advisory
      board for the International Tree Nut Council, International Pasta Organization,
      McCormick Science Institute, Oldways Preservation Trust, Paramount Farms and
      Pulse Canada; is a member of the International Carbohydrate Quality Consortium,
      executive board member of the Diabetes and Nutrition Study Group of the European 
      Association for the Study of Diabetes; is on the Clinical Practice Guidelines
      Expert Committee for Nutrition Therapy of the European Association for the Study 
      of Diabetes; and is a director of the Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical
      Trials Foundation. RJdS has received research support from the Canadian
      Foundation for Dietetic Research, Population Health Research Institute, and
      Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation; travel and consultant fees from the World
      Health Organization; consultant fees from Canadian Institutes of Health
      Research's Institute of Nutrition, Metabolism, and Diabetes and Health Canada;
      and a speaker's honorarium from McMaster Children's Hospital. DJAJ has received
      research grants from Saskatchewan Pulse Growers, the Agricultural Bioproducts
      Innovation Programme through the Pulse Research Network, Advanced Foods and
      Material Network, Loblaw Companies, Unilever, Barilla, Almond Board of
      California, Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, Pulse Canada, Kellogg's Company
      (Canada), Quaker Oats (Canada), Procter and Gamble Technical Centre, Bayer
      Consumer Care (Springfield, NJ, USA), Pepsi/Quaker, International Nut and Dried
      Fruit, Soy Foods Association of North America, Coca-Cola Company (investigator
      initiated, unrestricted grant), Solae, Haine Celestial, Sanitarium Company,
      Orafti, International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education
      Foundation, Peanut Institute, Soy Nutrition Institute, Canola and Flax Councils
      of Canada, Calorie Control Council, Canadian Institutes of Health Research,
      Canada Foundation for Innovation, and Ontario Research Fund; has received in-kind
      supplies for trials as a research support from the Almond board of California,
      Walnut Council of California, American Peanut Council, Barilla, Unilever, Unico, 
      Primo, Loblaw Companies, Quaker (PepsiCo), Pristine Gourmet, Bunge, Kellogg
      Canada, and WhiteWave Foods; has been on the speaker's panel, served on the
      scientific advisory board or received travel support or honorariums from the
      Almond Board of California, Canadian Agriculture Policy Institute, Loblaw
      Companies, Griffin Hospital (for the development of the NuVal scoring system),
      Coca-Cola Company, EPICURE, Danone, Diet Quality Photo Navigation, Better
      Therapeutics (FareWell), Verywell, True Health Initiative, Institute of Food
      Technologists, Soy Nutrition Institute, Herbalife Nutrition Institute,
      Saskatchewan Pulse Growers, Sanitarium Company, Orafti, Almond Board of
      California, American Peanut Council, International Tree Nut Council Nutrition
      Research and Education Foundation, Peanut Institute, Herbalife International,
      Pacific Health Laboratories, Nutritional Fundamentals for Health, Barilla,
      Metagenics, Bayer Consumer Care, Unilever Canada and Netherlands, Solae, Kellogg,
      Quaker Oats, Procter and Gamble, Abbott Laboratories, Dean Foods, California
      Strawberry Commission, Haine Celestial, PepsiCo, Alpro Foundation, Pioneer
      Hi-Bred International, DuPont Nutrition and Health, Spherix Consulting and
      WhiteWave Foods, Advanced Foods and Material Network, Canola and Flax Councils of
      Canada, Agri-Culture and Agri-Food Canada, Canadian Agri-Food Policy Institute,
      Pulse Canada, Saskatchewan Pulse Growers, Soy Foods Association of North America,
      Nutrition Foundation of Italy, Nutra-Source Diagnostics, McDougall Programme,
      Toronto Knowledge Translation Group (St Michael's Hospital), Canadian College of 
      Naturopathic Medicine, The Hospital for Sick Children, Canadian Nutrition
      Society, American Society of Nutrition, Arizona State University, Paolo Sorbini
      Foundation, and the Institute of Nutrition, Metabolism, and Diabetes; has
      received an honorarium from the US Department of Agriculture to present the 2013 
      W O Atwater Memorial Lecture and the 2013 Award for Excellence in Research from
      the International Nut and Dried Fruit Council; has received funding and travel
      support from the Canadian Society of Endocrinology and Metabolism to produce mini
      cases for the Canadian Diabetes Association; and is a member of the International
      Carbohydrate Quality Consortium. DJAJ's wife, Alexandra L Jenkins, is a director 
      and partner of Glycemic Index Laboratories, and his sister, Caroline Brydson,
      received funding through a grant from the St Michael's Hospital Foundation to
      develop a cookbook for one of his studies. JLS has received research support from
      the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Diabetes Canada, PSI Foundation,
      Banting and Best Diabetes Centre, American Society for Nutrition, INC
      International Nut and Dried Fruit Council Foundation, National Dried Fruit Trade 
      Association, the Tate and Lyle Nutritional Research Fund at the University of
      Toronto, the Glycemic Control and Cardiovascular Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Fund 
      at the University of Toronto (a fund established by the Alberta Pulse Growers),
      and the Nutrition Trialists Fund at the University of Toronto (a fund established
      by the Calorie Control Council); has received food donations to support
      randomised controlled trials from the Almond Board of California, California
      Walnut Commission, American Peanut Council, Barilla, Unilever, Unico/Primo,
      Loblaw Companies, Quaker (PepsiCo), Kellogg Canada, and WhiteWave Foods; has
      received speaker fees or honorariums from Diabetes Canada, Canadian Nutrition
      Society, Mott's, Dairy Farmers of Canada, Alberta Milk, FoodMinds, Memac Ogilvy &
      Mather, PepsiCo, The Ginger Network, International Sweeteners Association,
      Nestle, Pulse Canada, Canadian Society for Endocrinology and Metabolism, GI
      Foundation, Barilla Centre for Food and Nutrition, Abbott, Biofortis, California 
      Walnut Commission, American Society for Nutrition, Loma Linda University,
      Dietitians of Canada, European Food Safety Authority, and Physicians Committee
      for Responsible Medicine; has ad hoc consulting arrangements with Winston and
      Strawn, Perkins Coie, and Tate and Lyle, and Wirtschaftliche Vereinigung Zucker
      eV; is a member of the European Fruit Juice Association's scientific expert
      panel; is on the clinical practice guidelines expert committees of Diabetes
      Canada, European Association for the Study of Diabetes, Canadian Cardiovascular
      Society, and Obesity Canada; serves as an unpaid scientific adviser for the Food,
      Nutrition, and Safety Programme and the technical committee on carbohydrates of
      the International Life Science Institute North America; and is a member of the
      International Carbohydrate Quality Consortium, executive board member of the
      Diabetes and Nutrition Study Group of the European Association for the Study of
      Diabetes, and director of the Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical Studies
      foundation. JLS's wife is an employee of Unilever Canada. VLC, EV, SBM, AIC, TAK,
      VH, and LAL declare no competing interests. There are no products in development 
      or marketed products to declare.
EDAT- 2018/11/23 06:00
MHDA- 2019/03/26 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/23 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/23 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/23 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/03/26 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1136/bmj.k4644 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - BMJ. 2018 Nov 21;363:k4644. doi: 10.1136/bmj.k4644.

PMID- 30404896
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190320
LR  - 20190329
IS  - 1756-1833 (Electronic)
IS  - 0959-8138 (Linking)
VI  - 363
DP  - 2018 Nov 7
TI  - Sex differences in risk factors for myocardial infarction: cohort study of UK
      Biobank participants.
PG  - k4247
LID - 10.1136/bmj.k4247 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVES: To investigate sex differences in risk factors for incident
      myocardial infarction (MI) and whether they vary with age. DESIGN: Prospective
      population based study. SETTING: UK Biobank. PARTICIPANTS: 471 998 participants
      (56% women; mean age 56.2) with no history of cardiovascular disease. MAIN
      OUTCOME MEASURE: Incident (fatal and non-fatal) MI. RESULTS: 5081 participants
      (1463 (28.8%) of whom were women) had MI over seven years' mean follow-up,
      resulting in an incidence per 10 000 person years of 7.76 (95% confidence
      interval 7.37 to 8.16) for women and 24.35 (23.57 to 25.16) for men. Higher blood
      pressure indices, smoking intensity, body mass index, and the presence of
      diabetes were associated with an increased risk of MI in men and women, but
      associations were attenuated with age. In women, systolic blood pressure and
      hypertension, smoking status and intensity, and diabetes were associated with
      higher hazard ratios for MI compared with men: ratio of hazard ratios 1.09 (95%
      confidence interval 1.02 to 1.16) for systolic blood pressure, 1.55 (1.32 to
      1.83) for current smoking, 2.91 (1.56 to 5.45) for type 1 diabetes, and 1.47
      (1.16 to 1.87) for type 2 diabetes. There was no evidence that any of these
      ratios of hazard ratios decreased with age (P>0.2). With the exception of type 1 
      diabetes, the incidence of MI was higher in men than in women for all risk
      factors. CONCLUSIONS: Although the incidence of MI was higher in men than in
      women, several risk factors were more strongly associated with MI in women
      compared with men. Sex specific associations between risk factors and MI declined
      with age, but, where it occurred, the higher relative risk in women remained. As 
      the population ages and the prevalence of lifestyle associated risk factors
      increase, the incidence of MI in women will likely become more similar to that in
      men.
CI  - Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not
      already granted under a licence) please go to
      http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
FAU - Millett, Elizabeth R C
AU  - Millett ERC
AD  - The George Institute for Global Health, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2BQ, UK.
FAU - Peters, Sanne A E
AU  - Peters SAE
AD  - The George Institute for Global Health, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2BQ, UK 
      sanne.peters@georgeinstitute.ox.ac.uk.
AD  - Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center
      Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
FAU - Woodward, Mark
AU  - Woodward M
AD  - The George Institute for Global Health, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2BQ, UK.
AD  - The George Institute for Global Health, University of New South Wales, Newtown,
      NSW, Australia.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
LA  - eng
GR  - MC_QA137853/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom
GR  - Medical Research Council/United Kingdom
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20181107
PL  - England
TA  - BMJ
JT  - BMJ (Clinical research ed.)
JID - 8900488
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Age Factors
MH  - Aged
MH  - Body Mass Index
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Health Surveys
MH  - Humans
MH  - Hypertension/epidemiology
MH  - Incidence
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Myocardial Infarction/*epidemiology/etiology
MH  - Population Surveillance
MH  - Proportional Hazards Models
MH  - Prospective Studies
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - *Sex Factors
MH  - Smoking/epidemiology
MH  - Socioeconomic Factors
MH  - United Kingdom/epidemiology
PMC - PMC6364292
COIS- Competing interests: All authors have completed the ICMJE uniform disclosure form
      at www.icmje.org/coi_disclosure.pdf and declare: no support from any organisation
      for the submitted work; MW does consultancy for Amgen outside the submitted work;
      no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the
      submitted work.
EDAT- 2018/11/09 06:00
MHDA- 2019/03/21 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/09 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/09 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/09 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/03/21 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1136/bmj.k4247 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - BMJ. 2018 Nov 7;363:k4247. doi: 10.1136/bmj.k4247.

PMID- 30381468
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190321
LR  - 20190402
IS  - 1756-1833 (Electronic)
IS  - 0959-8138 (Linking)
VI  - 363
DP  - 2018 Oct 31
TI  - Association of paternal age with perinatal outcomes between 2007 and 2016 in the 
      United States: population based cohort study.
PG  - k4372
LID - 10.1136/bmj.k4372 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of advanced paternal age on maternal and
      perinatal outcomes in the United States. DESIGN: Retrospective, population based 
      cohort study. SETTING: US. POPULATION: 40 529 905 documented live births between 
      2007 and 2016. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary perinatal outcomes were gestational
      age, birth weight, Apgar score at five minutes, admission to a neonatal intensive
      care unit, need for postpartum antibiotics, and seizures. Primary maternal
      outcomes were gestational diabetes and pre-eclampsia. Secondary outcome was the
      number of preventable perinatal events. RESULTS: Higher paternal age was
      associated with an increased risk of premature birth, low birth weight, and low
      Apgar score. After adjustment for maternal age, infants born to fathers aged 45
      years or older had 14% higher odds of premature birth (odds ratio 1.14, 95%
      confidence interval 1.13 to 1.15), independent of gestational age, and 18% higher
      odds of seizures (1.18, 0.97 to 1.44) compared with infants of fathers aged 25 to
      34 years. The odds of gestational diabetes was 34% higher (1.34, 1.29 to 1.38) in
      mothers with the oldest partners. 13.2% (95% confidence interval 12.5% to 13.9%) 
      of premature births and 18.2% (17.5% to 18.9%) of gestational diabetes in births 
      associated with older fathers were estimated to be attributable to advanced
      paternal age. CONCLUSIONS: Advanced paternal age is associated with negative
      effects on both mothers and offspring. Given the relatively low prevalence of
      advanced paternal age in the US, population level impacts are currently modest.
      Nevertheless, as advanced paternal age has doubled in the US over the past
      generation, further investigation is warranted of the impact on birth outcomes
      and public health.
CI  - Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not
      already granted under a licence) please go to
      http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
FAU - Khandwala, Yash S
AU  - Khandwala YS
AD  - Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive,
      Stanford, CA 94305-5118, USA.
FAU - Baker, Valerie L
AU  - Baker VL
AD  - Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 
      Stanford, CA, USA.
FAU - Shaw, Gary M
AU  - Shaw GM
AD  - Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA,
      USA.
FAU - Stevenson, David K
AU  - Stevenson DK
AD  - Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA,
      USA.
FAU - Lu, Ying
AU  - Lu Y
AD  - Department of Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University School of Medicine,
      Stanford, CA, USA.
FAU - Eisenberg, Michael L
AU  - Eisenberg ML
AD  - Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive,
      Stanford, CA 94305-5118, USA eisenberg@stanford.edu.
AD  - Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 
      Stanford, CA, USA.
LA  - eng
GR  - T32 DK007357/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181031
PL  - England
TA  - BMJ
JT  - BMJ (Clinical research ed.)
JID - 8900488
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
DRIN- BMJ. 2018 Oct 31;363:k4466. PMID: 30381463
MH  - Adult
MH  - Apgar Score
MH  - Birth Weight
MH  - Diabetes, Gestational/epidemiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Gestational Age
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant, Newborn
MH  - Intensive Care Units, Neonatal/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - *Paternal Age
MH  - Pre-Eclampsia/epidemiology
MH  - Pregnancy
MH  - *Pregnancy Outcome
MH  - Premature Birth
MH  - Retrospective Studies
MH  - United States/epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
PMC - PMC6207919
COIS- Competing interests: All authors have completed the ICMJE uniform disclosure form
      at www.icmje.org/coi_disclosure.pdf and declare: no support from any organization
      for the submitted work; no financial relationships with any organisations that
      might have an interest in the submitted work in the previous three years; no
      other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the
      submitted work.
EDAT- 2018/11/02 06:00
MHDA- 2019/03/22 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/02 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/03/22 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1136/bmj.k4372 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - BMJ. 2018 Oct 31;363:k4372. doi: 10.1136/bmj.k4372.

PMID- 30924960
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190329
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Mar 29
TI  - Altered accelerator pedal control in a driving simulator in people with diabetic 
      peripheral neuropathy.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13957 [doi]
AB  - AIM: To investigate whether the sensory-motor impairment attributable to diabetic
      peripheral neuropathy would affect control of the accelerator pedal during a
      driving simulator task. METHODS: A total of 32 active drivers, 11 with diabetic
      peripheral neuropathy (mean +/- sd age 67+/-5.0 years), 10 with diabetes but no
      neuropathy (diabetes group; mean +/- sd age 62+/-10 years), and 11 healthy
      individuals without diabetes (healthy group; mean +/- sd age 60+/-11 years),
      undertook a test on a dynamometer to assess ankle plantar flexor muscle strength 
      and ankle joint proprioception function of the right leg, in addition to a
      driving simulator task. The following variables were measured: maximal ankle
      plantar flexor muscle strength; speed of strength generation (Nm/s); and ankle
      joint proprioception (ankle repositioning error, degrees). In the driving
      simulator task, driving speed (mph), accelerator pedal signal (degrees) and the
      duration of specific 'loss-of-control events' (s) were measured during two drives
      (Drive 1, Drive 2). RESULTS: Participants with diabetic peripheral neuropathy had
      a lower speed of strength generation (P<0.001), lower maximal ankle plantar
      flexor muscle strength (P<0.001) and impaired ankle proprioception (P=0.034)
      compared to healthy participants. The diabetic peripheral neuropathy group drove 
      more slowly compared with the healthy group (Drive 1 P=0.048; Drive 2 P=0.042)
      and showed marked differences in the use of the accelerator pedal compared to
      both the diabetes group (P=0.010) and the healthy group (P=0.002). Participants
      with diabetic peripheral neuropathy had the longest duration of loss-of-control
      events, but after one drive, this was greatly reduced (P=0.023). CONCLUSIONS:
      Muscle function, ankle proprioception and accelerator pedal control are all
      affected in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, adversely influencing
      driving performance, but potential for improvement with targeted practice remains
      possible. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
CI  - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
FAU - Perazzolo, M
AU  - Perazzolo M
AD  - Research Centre for Musculoskeletal Science and Sports Medicine, School of
      Healthcare Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Manchester Metropolitan
      University.
AD  - Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna,
      Italy.
FAU - Reeves, N D
AU  - Reeves ND
AD  - Research Centre for Musculoskeletal Science and Sports Medicine, School of
      Healthcare Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Manchester Metropolitan
      University.
FAU - Bowling, F L
AU  - Bowling FL
AD  - Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester,
      UK.
FAU - Boulton, A J M
AU  - Boulton AJM
AD  - Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester,
      UK.
AD  - Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA.
FAU - Raffi, M
AU  - Raffi M
AD  - Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna,
      Italy.
FAU - Marple-Horvat, D E
AU  - Marple-Horvat DE
AD  - Research Centre for Musculoskeletal Science and Sports Medicine, School of
      Healthcare Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Manchester Metropolitan
      University.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190329
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2019/03/30 06:00
MHDA- 2019/03/30 06:00
CRDT- 2019/03/30 06:00
PHST- 2019/03/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/03/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/03/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13957 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2019 Mar 29. doi: 10.1111/dme.13957.

PMID- 30920676
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190415
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Mar 28
TI  - Arterial stiffness as a risk factor for cardiovascular events and all-cause
      mortality in people with Type 2 diabetes.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13954 [doi]
AB  - AIM: To quantify the risk of different non-invasive arterial stiffness
      measurements with macrovascular disease and all-cause mortality in high-risk
      people with Type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study of 
      1910 people with Type 2 diabetes included in the Second Manifestations of
      ARTerial disease (SMART) study. Arterial stiffness was assessed by brachial
      artery pulse pressure, normal range (>/=0.9) ankle-brachial index and carotid
      artery distension. Cox regression was used to evaluate the effects of arterial
      stiffness on risk of cardiovascular events (composite of myocardial infarction,
      stroke and vascular mortality) and all-cause mortality. RESULTS: A total of 380
      new cardiovascular events and 436 deaths occurred during a median (interquartile 
      range) follow-up of 7.5 (4.1-11.0) years. A 10-mmHg higher brachial pulse
      pressure was related to higher hazard of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio
      1.09, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.16) and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 1.10, 95% CI
      1.03 to 1.16). A 0.1-point lower ankle-brachial index within the normal range was
      related to a higher hazard of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio 1.13, 95% CI
      1.01 to 1.27) and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 1.17, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.31). A
      one-unit (10(-3) xkPa(-1) ) lower carotid artery distensibility coefficient was
      related to a higher hazard of vascular mortality (hazard ratio 1.04, 95% CI 1.00 
      to 1.09) and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 1.04, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.07).
      CONCLUSION: Increased arterial stiffness, as measured by either increased pulse
      pressure, normal-range ankle-brachial index or carotid artery distensibility
      coefficient, is related to increased hazard of cardiovascular events and
      all-cause mortality in people with Type 2 diabetes.
CI  - (c) 2019 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on
      behalf of Diabetes UK.
FAU - Sharif, S
AU  - Sharif S
AD  - Department of Vascular Medicine, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The 
      Netherlands.
FAU - Visseren, F L J
AU  - Visseren FLJ
AD  - Department of Vascular Medicine, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The 
      Netherlands.
FAU - Spiering, W
AU  - Spiering W
AD  - Department of Vascular Medicine, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The 
      Netherlands.
FAU - de Jong, P A
AU  - de Jong PA
AD  - Department of Radiology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The
      Netherlands.
FAU - Bots, M L
AU  - Bots ML
AD  - Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre
      Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
FAU - Westerink, J
AU  - Westerink J
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5021-5227
AD  - Department of Vascular Medicine, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The 
      Netherlands.
CN  - SMART study group
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190328
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2019/03/29 06:00
MHDA- 2019/03/29 06:00
CRDT- 2019/03/29 06:00
PHST- 2019/03/25 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/03/29 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/03/29 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/03/29 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13954 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2019 Mar 28. doi: 10.1111/dme.13954.

PMID- 30920669
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190328
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Mar 28
TI  - Cheiroarthropathy and tendinopathy in diabetes.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13955 [doi]
AB  - Joint problems commonly occur in people with diabetes. Cheiroarthropathy affects 
      the hands and results in painless limited finger joint extension, appearing to be
      associated with longer diabetes duration and the presence of microvascular
      complications. The prevalence of cheiroarthropathy seems to be falling, perhaps
      as a result of improvements in glycaemic management. Non-enzymatic glycation of
      collagen results in abnormally crosslinked protein resistant to degradation with 
      subsequent increased build-up of collagen in joints. The management of
      cheiroarthropathy is predominantly conservative, with occupational and hand
      therapy at the forefront. Tendinopathy is more common in people with diabetes
      than those without, and is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. As
      with cheiroarthropathy, the exact causative mechanism of tendinopathy in diabetes
      is not known, but may be linked to inflammation, apoptosis and increased
      vascularity of affected tendons, driven by hyperinsulinaemia. Local fat pads have
      also been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of tendinopathy. This
      article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
CI  - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
FAU - Hill, N E
AU  - Hill NE
AD  - Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London.
FAU - Roscoe, D
AU  - Roscoe D
AD  - Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre, Loughborough.
AD  - University of Loughborough, Loughborough.
FAU - Stacey, M J
AU  - Stacey MJ
AD  - Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London.
AD  - Defence Medical Services, Lichfield, UK.
FAU - Chew, S
AU  - Chew S
AD  - Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190328
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2019/03/29 06:00
MHDA- 2019/03/29 06:00
CRDT- 2019/03/29 06:00
PHST- 2019/03/29 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/03/29 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/03/29 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13955 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2019 Mar 28. doi: 10.1111/dme.13955.

PMID- 30327384
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190325
LR  - 20190325
IS  - 1939-327X (Electronic)
IS  - 0012-1797 (Linking)
VI  - 68
IP  - 1
DP  - 2019 Jan
TI  - Adaptive beta-Cell Neogenesis in the Adult Mouse in Response to
      Glucocorticoid-Induced Insulin Resistance.
PG  - 95-108
LID - 10.2337/db17-1314 [doi]
AB  - Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are characterized by deficient insulin secretion 
      and decreased beta-cell mass. Thus, regenerative strategies to increase beta-cell
      mass need to be developed. To characterize mechanisms of beta-cell plasticity, we
      studied a model of severe insulin resistance in the adult mouse and defined how
      beta-cells adapt. Chronic corticosterone (CORT) treatment was given to adult mice
      and led to rapid insulin resistance and adaptive increased insulin secretion.
      Adaptive and massive increase of beta-cell mass was observed during treatment up 
      to 8 weeks. beta-Cell mass increase was partially reversible upon treatment
      cessation and reinduced upon subsequent treatment. beta-Cell neogenesis was
      suggested by an increased number of islets, mainly close to ducts, and increased 
      Sox9 and Ngn3 mRNA levels in islets, but lineage-tracing experiments revealed
      that neoformed beta-cells did not derive from Sox9- or Ngn3-expressing cells.
      CORT treatment after beta-cell depletion partially restored beta-cells. Finally, 
      beta-cell neogenesis was shown to be indirectly stimulated by CORT because serum 
      from CORT-treated mice increased beta-cell differentiation in in vitro cultures
      of pancreatic buds. Altogether, the results present a novel model of beta-cell
      neogenesis in the adult mouse and identify the presence of neogenic factors in
      the serum of CORT-treated mice.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Courty, Emilie
AU  - Courty E
AD  - Sorbonne Universite, INSERM, Saint-Antoine Research Center, Paris, France.
AD  - Hospitalo-Universitary Institute, ICAN, Paris, France.
FAU - Besseiche, Adrien
AU  - Besseiche A
AD  - Sorbonne Universite, INSERM, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France.
FAU - Do, Thi Thu Huong
AU  - Do TTH
AD  - Sorbonne Universite, INSERM, Saint-Antoine Research Center, Paris, France.
AD  - Hospitalo-Universitary Institute, ICAN, Paris, France.
FAU - Liboz, Alexandrine
AU  - Liboz A
AD  - Sorbonne Universite, INSERM, Saint-Antoine Research Center, Paris, France.
AD  - Hospitalo-Universitary Institute, ICAN, Paris, France.
FAU - Aguid, Fatima Mohamed
AU  - Aguid FM
AD  - Sorbonne Universite, INSERM, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France.
FAU - Quilichini, Evans
AU  - Quilichini E
AD  - Sorbonne Universite, CNRS, Institut de Biologie Paris-Seine, Paris, France.
FAU - Buscato, Melissa
AU  - Buscato M
AD  - Institute of Metabolic and Cardiovascular Diseases, UMR1048, INSERM, UPS,
      Universite de Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
FAU - Gourdy, Pierre
AU  - Gourdy P
AD  - Institute of Metabolic and Cardiovascular Diseases, UMR1048, INSERM, UPS,
      Universite de Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
AD  - Service de Diabetologie, CHU de Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
FAU - Gautier, Jean-Francois
AU  - Gautier JF
AD  - Sorbonne Universite, INSERM, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France.
AD  - Lariboisiere Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of
      Diabetes and Endocrinology, University Paris-Diderot 7, Sorbonne Paris Cite,
      Paris, France.
FAU - Riveline, Jean-Pierre
AU  - Riveline JP
AD  - Sorbonne Universite, INSERM, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France.
AD  - Lariboisiere Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of
      Diabetes and Endocrinology, University Paris-Diderot 7, Sorbonne Paris Cite,
      Paris, France.
FAU - Haumaitre, Cecile
AU  - Haumaitre C
AD  - Sorbonne Universite, CNRS, Institut de Biologie Paris-Seine, Paris, France.
FAU - Buyse, Marion
AU  - Buyse M
AD  - Sorbonne Universite, INSERM, Saint-Antoine Research Center, Paris, France.
AD  - Hospitalo-Universitary Institute, ICAN, Paris, France.
AD  - Universite Paris-Sud, EA 4123, Chatenay-Malabry, France.
AD  - Department of Pharmacy, Saint-Antoine Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de
      Paris, Paris, France.
FAU - Feve, Bruno
AU  - Feve B
AD  - Sorbonne Universite, INSERM, Saint-Antoine Research Center, Paris, France.
AD  - Hospitalo-Universitary Institute, ICAN, Paris, France.
AD  - Department of Endocrinology, Saint-Antoine Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux
      de Paris, Paris, France.
FAU - Guillemain, Ghislaine
AU  - Guillemain G
AD  - Sorbonne Universite, INSERM, Saint-Antoine Research Center, Paris, France.
AD  - Hospitalo-Universitary Institute, ICAN, Paris, France.
FAU - Blondeau, Bertrand
AU  - Blondeau B
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-1106-1509
AD  - Sorbonne Universite, INSERM, Saint-Antoine Research Center, Paris, France
      bertrand.blondeau@sorbonne-universite.fr.
AD  - Hospitalo-Universitary Institute, ICAN, Paris, France.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20181016
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes
JT  - Diabetes
JID - 0372763
RN  - 0 (Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors)
RN  - 0 (Glucocorticoids)
RN  - 0 (Nerve Tissue Proteins)
RN  - 0 (Neurog3 protein, mouse)
RN  - 0 (SOX9 Transcription Factor)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/genetics
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/genetics
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/genetics
MH  - Female
MH  - Flow Cytometry
MH  - Glucocorticoids/*pharmacology
MH  - Insulin Resistance/genetics/physiology
MH  - Insulin-Secreting Cells/*drug effects/*metabolism
MH  - Male
MH  - Mice
MH  - Mice, Inbred C57BL
MH  - Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics
MH  - SOX9 Transcription Factor/genetics
EDAT- 2018/10/18 06:00
MHDA- 2019/03/26 06:00
CRDT- 2018/10/18 06:00
PHST- 2017/10/31 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/10/11 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/10/18 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/03/26 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/10/18 06:00 [entrez]
AID - db17-1314 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/db17-1314 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes. 2019 Jan;68(1):95-108. doi: 10.2337/db17-1314. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

PMID- 30923164
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190329
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Mar 28
TI  - Early Intervention for Diabetes in Medical and Surgical Inpatients Decreases
      Hyperglycemia and Hospital-Acquired Infections: A Cluster Randomized Trial.
LID - dc182342 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-2342 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: To investigate if early electronic identification and bedside
      management of inpatients with diabetes improves glycemic control in noncritical
      care. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We investigated a proactive or early
      intervention model of care (whereby an inpatient diabetes team electronically
      identified individuals with diabetes and aimed to provide bedside management
      within 24 h of admission) compared with usual care (a referral-based consultation
      service). We conducted a cluster randomized trial on eight wards, consisting of a
      10-week baseline period (all clusters received usual care) followed by a 12-week 
      active period (clusters randomized to early intervention or usual care). Outcomes
      were adverse glycemic days (AGDs) (patient-days with glucose <4 or >15 mmol/L
      [<72 or >270 mg/dL]) and adverse patient outcomes. RESULTS: We included 1,002
      consecutive adult inpatients with diabetes or new hyperglycemia. More patients
      received specialist diabetes management (92% vs. 15%, P < 0.001) and new insulin 
      treatment (57% vs. 34%, P = 0.001) with early intervention. At the cluster level,
      incidence of AGDs decreased by 24% from 243 to 186 per 1,000 patient-days in the 
      intervention arm (P < 0.001), with no change in the control arm. At the
      individual level, adjusted number of AGDs per person decreased from a mean 1.4
      (SD 1.6) to 1.0 (0.9) days (-28% change [95% CI -45 to -11%], P = 0.001) in the
      intervention arm but did not change in the control arm (1.8 [2.0] to 1.5 [1.8],
      -9% change [-25 to 6%], P = 0.23). Early intervention reduced overt hyperglycemia
      (55% decrease in patient-days with mean glucose >15 mmol/L, P < 0.001) and
      hospital-acquired infections (odds ratio 0.20 [95% CI 0.07-0.58], P = 0.003).
      CONCLUSIONS: Early identification and management of inpatients with diabetes
      decreased hyperglycemia and hospital-acquired infections.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Kyi, Mervyn
AU  - Kyi M
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4341-8250
AD  - Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
AD  - Department of Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, The University of Melbourne,
      Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Colman, Peter G
AU  - Colman PG
AD  - Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Wraight, Paul R
AU  - Wraight PR
AD  - Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Reid, Jane
AU  - Reid J
AD  - Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Gorelik, Alexandra
AU  - Gorelik A
AD  - Department of Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, The University of Melbourne,
      Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
AD  - Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Galligan, Anna
AU  - Galligan A
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4711-8180
AD  - Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Kumar, Shanal
AU  - Kumar S
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9134-3671
AD  - Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Rowan, Lois M
AU  - Rowan LM
AD  - Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Marley, Katie A
AU  - Marley KA
AD  - Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Nankervis, Alison J
AU  - Nankervis AJ
AD  - Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Russell, David M
AU  - Russell DM
AD  - Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Fourlanos, Spiros
AU  - Fourlanos S
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5153-8324
AD  - Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
      spiros.fourlanos@mh.org.au.
AD  - Department of Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, The University of Melbourne,
      Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190328
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/03/30 06:00
MHDA- 2019/03/30 06:00
CRDT- 2019/03/30 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/09 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/02/01 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/03/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/03/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/03/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-2342 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-2342 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Mar 28. pii: dc18-2342. doi: 10.2337/dc18-2342.

PMID- 30923163
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190329
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Mar 28
TI  - The Effect of Liquid Meal Replacements on Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in
      Overweight/Obese Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and
      Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.
LID - dc182270 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-2270 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: The evidence for liquid meal replacements in diabetes has not been
      summarized. Our objective was to synthesize the evidence of the effect of liquid 
      meal replacements on cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight/obese individuals
      with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data sources included MEDLINE,
      EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library through 10 December 2018. We included randomized
      trials of >/=2 weeks assessing the effect of liquid meal replacements in weight
      loss diets compared with traditional weight loss diets on cardiometabolic risk
      factors in overweight/obese subjects with type 2 diabetes. Two independent
      reviewers extracted relevant data and assessed risk of bias. Data were pooled
      using the inverse variance method. The overall certainty of the evidence was
      evaluated using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and
      Evaluation). RESULTS: Nine trial comparisons (N = 961 [median follow-up 24
      weeks]) met eligibility criteria. Mean differences were for body weight -2.37 kg 
      (95% CI -3.30 to -1.44), BMI -0.87 kg/m(2) (-1.31 to -0.42), body fat -1.66%
      (-2.17 to -1.15), waist circumference -2.24 cm (-3.72 to -0.77), HbA1c -0.43%
      (-0.66 to -0.19) (-4.7 mmol/mol [-7.2 to -2.1]), fasting glucose -0.63 mmol/L
      (-0.99 to -0.27), fasting insulin -11.83 pmol/L (-23.11 to -0.54), systolic blood
      pressure -4.97 mmHg (-7.32 to -2.62), and diastolic blood pressure -1.98 mmHg
      (-3.05 to -0.91). There was no effect on blood lipids. The overall certainty of
      the evidence was low to moderate owing to imprecision and/or inconsistency.
      CONCLUSIONS: Liquid meal replacements in weight loss diets lead to modest
      reductions in body weight, BMI, and systolic blood pressure, and reductions of
      marginal clinical significance in body fat, waist circumference, HbA1c, fasting
      glucose, fasting insulin, and diastolic blood pressure. More high-quality trials 
      are needed to improve the certainty in our estimates.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Noronha, Jarvis C
AU  - Noronha JC
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St.
      Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, Canada.
FAU - Nishi, Stephanie K
AU  - Nishi SK
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St.
      Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, Canada.
FAU - Braunstein, Catherine R
AU  - Braunstein CR
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St.
      Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, Canada.
FAU - Khan, Tauseef A
AU  - Khan TA
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St.
      Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, Canada.
FAU - Blanco Mejia, Sonia
AU  - Blanco Mejia S
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St.
      Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, Canada.
FAU - Kendall, Cyril W C
AU  - Kendall CWC
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St.
      Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, Canada.
AD  - College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
FAU - Kahleova, Hana
AU  - Kahleova H
AD  - Diabetes Centre, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech 
      Republic.
AD  - Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington, DC.
FAU - Rahelic, Dario
AU  - Rahelic D
AD  - Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Pharmacology, Dubrava
      University Hospital, Zagreb, Croatia.
AD  - School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
FAU - Salas-Salvado, Jordi
AU  - Salas-Salvado J
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2700-7459
AD  - CIBER Fisiopatologia de la Obesidad y Nutricion (CIBERObn), Instituto de Salud
      Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
AD  - Human Nutrition Unit, Institut d'Investigacio Sanitaria Pere i Virgili,
      Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Reus, Spain.
FAU - Leiter, Lawrence A
AU  - Leiter LA
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1040-6229
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St.
      Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, Canada.
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto,
      Canada.
AD  - Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
FAU - Sievenpiper, John L
AU  - Sievenpiper JL
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3270-5772
AD  - Toronto 3D (Diet, Digestive Tract and Disease) Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical
      Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St.
      Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada john.sievenpiper@utoronto.ca.
AD  - Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto,
      Toronto, Canada.
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto,
      Canada.
AD  - Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
DEP - 20190328
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/03/30 06:00
MHDA- 2019/03/30 06:00
CRDT- 2019/03/30 06:00
PHST- 2018/10/31 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/02/14 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/03/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/03/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/03/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-2270 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-2270 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Mar 28. pii: dc18-2270. doi: 10.2337/dc18-2270.

PMID- 30912810
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190326
IS  - 1945-7197 (Electronic)
IS  - 0021-972X (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Mar 26
TI  - Assessment of a multidiscliplinary intervention in patients with BMI >/=35Kg/m2
      and recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes.
LID - jc.2018-01148 [pii]
LID - 10.1210/jc.2018-01148 [doi]
AB  - CONTEXT: Patients with BMI >/=35 Kg/m2 have lower benefits with intensive
      treatments and metabolic control goals are more difficult to reach. OBJECTIVE:
      Evaluate the effect of a comprehensive care program in patients with BMI >/=35
      Kg/m2. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Comprehensive Care Center in a 
      National Institute of Health. PATIENTS: Patients with type 2 diabetes, </=five
      years of diagnosis, without disabling complications, non-smokers, BMI <45 kg/m2. 
      INTERVENTION (S): Exercise and nutritional interventions are modified for
      patients with a higher BMI to achieve metabolic control. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):
      Main outcome is achievement of treatment goals defined as HbA1c <7%, LDL-c<100
      mg/dl and BP <130/80 mmHg. Secondary measures were the percentage of patients
      achieving three metabolic goals. RESULTS: 587 patients with annual evaluation
      were included. Mean age was 55.3+/-9.5 years, 56.6% women, time since diagnosis
      of one year (0-5). BMI <35 Kg/m2 group included 521 patients and BMI >/=35 Kg/m2 
      group included 66 patients. In the BMI >/=35 Kg/m2 group we observed a greater
      decrease in weight and fat mass at 3 months compared to <35 Kg/m2 group, but the 
      HbA1c, LDL-c or BP goals were similar at 3 months and 1 year between groups.
      CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive interventions are equally effective in patients with
      recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes with BMI >/=35 Kg/m2 compared to patients with
      lower BMI.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2019 Endocrine Society.
FAU - Garcia-Ulloa, Ana Cristina
AU  - Garcia-Ulloa AC
AD  - Centro de Atencion Integral del Paciente con Diabetes (CAIPaDi), Instituto
      Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran. Mexico City, Mexico.
FAU - Landa-Anell, Victoria
AU  - Landa-Anell V
AD  - Centro de Atencion Integral del Paciente con Diabetes (CAIPaDi), Instituto
      Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran. Mexico City, Mexico.
FAU - Melgarejo-Hernandez, Marco
AU  - Melgarejo-Hernandez M
AD  - Centro de Atencion Integral del Paciente con Diabetes (CAIPaDi), Instituto
      Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran. Mexico City, Mexico.
FAU - Villegas-Narvaez, Andrea
AU  - Villegas-Narvaez A
AD  - Centro de Atencion Integral del Paciente con Diabetes (CAIPaDi), Instituto
      Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran. Mexico City, Mexico.
FAU - Urbina-Arronte, Luz Elena
AU  - Urbina-Arronte LE
AD  - Centro de Atencion Integral del Paciente con Diabetes (CAIPaDi), Instituto
      Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran. Mexico City, Mexico.
FAU - Hernandez-Jimenez, Sergio
AU  - Hernandez-Jimenez S
AD  - Centro de Atencion Integral del Paciente con Diabetes (CAIPaDi), Instituto
      Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran. Mexico City, Mexico.
CN  - CAIPaDi Study Group
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190326
PL  - United States
TA  - J Clin Endocrinol Metab
JT  - The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
JID - 0375362
EDAT- 2019/03/27 06:00
MHDA- 2019/03/27 06:00
CRDT- 2019/03/27 06:00
PHST- 2018/05/25 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/03/20 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/03/27 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/03/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/03/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - 5419223 [pii]
AID - 10.1210/jc.2018-01148 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2019 Mar 26. pii: 5419223. doi: 10.1210/jc.2018-01148.

PMID- 30912798
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190326
IS  - 1945-7197 (Electronic)
IS  - 0021-972X (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Mar 26
TI  - Copy Number Variation in GCK in patients with Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the
      Young.
LID - jc.2018-02574 [pii]
LID - 10.1210/jc.2018-02574 [doi]
AB  - PURPOSE: Next generation sequencing (NGS) methods to diagnose maturity-onset
      diabetes of the young (MODY), a monogenic autosomal dominant cause of diabetes,
      do not typically detect large-scale copy number variations (CNVs). New techniques
      may allow assessment for CNVs using output data from targeted NGS, without
      requiring additional sequencing. Using this technique, two kindreds of patients
      presenting with features of MODY were found to bear the same heterozygous
      large-scale deletion in GCK. METHODS: Patients suspected of having MODY but with 
      negative targeted NGS pathogenic variant calling were re-analyzed using the CNV
      caller tool (VarSeq v1.4.3). Two patients were identified as having a possible
      heterozygous whole exon deletion affecting exon 1 of GCK. For confirmation and
      determination of the exact breakpoints, whole exome sequencing (WES) followed by 
      Sanger sequencing were used. Familial samples from both affected and non-affected
      first-degree relatives were then analyzed for each proband. RESULTS: A novel
      heterozygous whole-exon deletion spanning 4,763 base pairs affecting the entire
      exon 1 of GCK was detected in two apparently unrelated patients with clinical
      features of MODY. This deletion showed segregation concordance across generations
      in affected and non-affected family members. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings confirm
      the utility of applying the CNV caller tool to screen for CNVs in GCK from NGS
      data. In so doing, we identified a novel deletion of exon 1 of GCK as likely
      causal for MODY. Our data indicate that incorporating CNV analysis routinely when
      assessing for MODY via targeted NGS may increase diagnostic yield and reduce
      false negative genetic testing rates.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2019 Endocrine Society.
FAU - Berberich, Amanda J
AU  - Berberich AJ
AD  - Department of Medicine and Robarts Research Institute, Schulich School of
      Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario.
FAU - Huot, Celine
AU  - Huot C
AD  - Department of Medicine and Robarts Research Institute, Schulich School of
      Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario.
FAU - Cao, Henian
AU  - Cao H
AD  - Department of Medicine and Robarts Research Institute, Schulich School of
      Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario.
FAU - McIntyre, Adam D
AU  - McIntyre AD
AD  - Department of Medicine and Robarts Research Institute, Schulich School of
      Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario.
FAU - Robinson, John F
AU  - Robinson JF
AD  - Department of Medicine and Robarts Research Institute, Schulich School of
      Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario.
FAU - Wang, Jian
AU  - Wang J
AD  - Department of Medicine and Robarts Research Institute, Schulich School of
      Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario.
FAU - Hegele, Robert A
AU  - Hegele RA
AD  - Department of Medicine and Robarts Research Institute, Schulich School of
      Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190326
PL  - United States
TA  - J Clin Endocrinol Metab
JT  - The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
JID - 0375362
EDAT- 2019/03/27 06:00
MHDA- 2019/03/27 06:00
CRDT- 2019/03/27 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/29 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/03/20 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/03/27 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/03/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/03/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - 5419225 [pii]
AID - 10.1210/jc.2018-02574 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2019 Mar 26. pii: 5419225. doi: 10.1210/jc.2018-02574.

PMID- 30903688
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190327
IS  - 1945-7197 (Electronic)
IS  - 0021-972X (Linking)
VI  - 104
IP  - 5
DP  - 2019 May 1
TI  - Treatment of Diabetes in Older Adults: An Endocrine Society* Clinical Practice
      Guideline.
PG  - 1520-1574
LID - 10.1210/jc.2019-00198 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: The objective is to formulate clinical practice guidelines for the
      treatment of diabetes in older adults. CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes, particularly type
      2, is becoming more prevalent in the general population, especially in
      individuals over the age of 65 years. The underlying pathophysiology of the
      disease in these patients is exacerbated by the direct effects of aging on
      metabolic regulation. Similarly, aging effects interact with diabetes to
      accelerate the progression of many common diabetes complications. Each section in
      this guideline covers all aspects of the etiology and available evidence,
      primarily from controlled trials, on therapeutic options and outcomes in this
      population. The goal is to give guidance to practicing health care providers that
      will benefit patients with diabetes (both type 1 and type 2), paying particular
      attention to avoiding unnecessary and/or harmful adverse effects.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2019 Endocrine Society.
FAU - LeRoith, Derek
AU  - LeRoith D
AD  - Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.
FAU - Biessels, Geert Jan
AU  - Biessels GJ
AD  - University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
FAU - Braithwaite, Susan S
AU  - Braithwaite SS
AD  - Presence Saint Francis Hospital, Evanston, Illinois.
AD  - Presence Saint Joseph Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.
FAU - Casanueva, Felipe F
AU  - Casanueva FF
AD  - Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago, CIBER de Fisiopatologia Obesidad
      y Nutricion, Instituto Salud Carlos III, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
FAU - Draznin, Boris
AU  - Draznin B
AD  - University of Colorado Denver Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado.
FAU - Halter, Jeffrey B
AU  - Halter JB
AD  - University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
AD  - National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.
FAU - Hirsch, Irl B
AU  - Hirsch IB
AD  - University of Washington Medical Center-Roosevelt, Seattle, Washington.
FAU - McDonnell, Marie E
AU  - McDonnell ME
AD  - Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
FAU - Molitch, Mark E
AU  - Molitch ME
AD  - Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.
FAU - Murad, M Hassan
AU  - Murad MH
AD  - Division of Preventive Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
FAU - Sinclair, Alan J
AU  - Sinclair AJ
AD  - King's College, London, United Kingdom.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - J Clin Endocrinol Metab
JT  - The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
JID - 0375362
EDAT- 2019/03/25 06:00
MHDA- 2019/03/25 06:00
CRDT- 2019/03/24 06:00
PHST- 2019/01/25 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/01/25 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/03/25 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/03/25 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/03/24 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 5413486 [pii]
AID - 10.1210/jc.2019-00198 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2019 May 1;104(5):1520-1574. doi: 10.1210/jc.2019-00198.

PMID- 30865797
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190325
LR  - 20190325
IS  - 1533-4406 (Electronic)
IS  - 0028-4793 (Linking)
VI  - 380
IP  - 11
DP  - 2019 Mar 14
TI  - Mendelian Randomization Study of ACLY and Cardiovascular Disease.
PG  - 1033-1042
LID - 10.1056/NEJMoa1806747 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: ATP citrate lyase is an enzyme in the cholesterol-biosynthesis
      pathway upstream of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the 
      target of statins. Whether the genetic inhibition of ATP citrate lyase is
      associated with deleterious outcomes and whether it has the same effect, per unit
      decrease in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level, as the genetic
      inhibition of HMGCR is unclear. METHODS: We constructed genetic scores composed
      of independently inherited variants in the genes encoding ATP citrate lyase
      (ACLY) and HMGCR to create instruments that mimic the effect of ATP citrate lyase
      inhibitors and HMGCR inhibitors (statins), respectively. We then compared the
      associations of these genetic scores with plasma lipid levels, lipoprotein
      levels, and the risk of cardiovascular events and cancer. RESULTS: A total of
      654,783 participants, including 105,429 participants who had major cardiovascular
      events, were included in the study. The ACLY and HMGCR scores were associated
      with similar patterns of changes in plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels and with 
      similar effects on the risk of cardiovascular events per decrease of 10 mg per
      deciliter in the LDL cholesterol level: odds ratio for cardiovascular events,
      0.823 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78 to 0.87; P = 4.0x10(-14)) for the ACLY 
      score and 0.836 (95% CI, 0.81 to 0.87; P = 3.9x10(-19)) for the HMGCR score.
      Neither lifelong genetic inhibition of ATP citrate lyase nor lifelong genetic
      inhibition of HMGCR was associated with an increased risk of cancer. CONCLUSIONS:
      Genetic variants that mimic the effect of ATP citrate lyase inhibitors and
      statins appeared to lower plasma LDL cholesterol levels by the same mechanism of 
      action and were associated with similar effects on the risk of cardiovascular
      disease per unit decrease in the LDL cholesterol level. (Funded by Esperion
      Therapeutics and others.).
CI  - Copyright (c) 2019 Massachusetts Medical Society.
FAU - Ference, Brian A
AU  - Ference BA
AD  - From the Centre for Naturally Randomized Trials (B.A.F., T.B.F.), Medical
      Research Council, British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit,
      Department of Public Health and Primary Care (B.A.F., S.B., C.O.-W., A.M.W.,
      A.S.B., E.D.A., J.D.), Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit (S.B.), and
      NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit in Donor Health and Genomics (A.S.B.,
      E.D.A., J.D.), University of Cambridge, Cambridge, and Imperial Centre for
      Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, 
      School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London (K.K.R.) - all in the
      United Kingdom; the Department of Pharmacologic and Biomolecular Sciences,
      University of Milan and Multimedica IRCCS, Milan (A.L.C.); Michigan State
      University, East Lansing (D.R.N.); the Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic 
      Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (J.J.P.K.); and Monash
      University, Clayton, VIC, Australia (S.J.N.).
FAU - Ray, Kausik K
AU  - Ray KK
AD  - From the Centre for Naturally Randomized Trials (B.A.F., T.B.F.), Medical
      Research Council, British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit,
      Department of Public Health and Primary Care (B.A.F., S.B., C.O.-W., A.M.W.,
      A.S.B., E.D.A., J.D.), Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit (S.B.), and
      NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit in Donor Health and Genomics (A.S.B.,
      E.D.A., J.D.), University of Cambridge, Cambridge, and Imperial Centre for
      Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, 
      School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London (K.K.R.) - all in the
      United Kingdom; the Department of Pharmacologic and Biomolecular Sciences,
      University of Milan and Multimedica IRCCS, Milan (A.L.C.); Michigan State
      University, East Lansing (D.R.N.); the Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic 
      Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (J.J.P.K.); and Monash
      University, Clayton, VIC, Australia (S.J.N.).
FAU - Catapano, Alberico L
AU  - Catapano AL
AD  - From the Centre for Naturally Randomized Trials (B.A.F., T.B.F.), Medical
      Research Council, British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit,
      Department of Public Health and Primary Care (B.A.F., S.B., C.O.-W., A.M.W.,
      A.S.B., E.D.A., J.D.), Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit (S.B.), and
      NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit in Donor Health and Genomics (A.S.B.,
      E.D.A., J.D.), University of Cambridge, Cambridge, and Imperial Centre for
      Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, 
      School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London (K.K.R.) - all in the
      United Kingdom; the Department of Pharmacologic and Biomolecular Sciences,
      University of Milan and Multimedica IRCCS, Milan (A.L.C.); Michigan State
      University, East Lansing (D.R.N.); the Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic 
      Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (J.J.P.K.); and Monash
      University, Clayton, VIC, Australia (S.J.N.).
FAU - Ference, Thatcher B
AU  - Ference TB
AD  - From the Centre for Naturally Randomized Trials (B.A.F., T.B.F.), Medical
      Research Council, British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit,
      Department of Public Health and Primary Care (B.A.F., S.B., C.O.-W., A.M.W.,
      A.S.B., E.D.A., J.D.), Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit (S.B.), and
      NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit in Donor Health and Genomics (A.S.B.,
      E.D.A., J.D.), University of Cambridge, Cambridge, and Imperial Centre for
      Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, 
      School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London (K.K.R.) - all in the
      United Kingdom; the Department of Pharmacologic and Biomolecular Sciences,
      University of Milan and Multimedica IRCCS, Milan (A.L.C.); Michigan State
      University, East Lansing (D.R.N.); the Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic 
      Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (J.J.P.K.); and Monash
      University, Clayton, VIC, Australia (S.J.N.).
FAU - Burgess, Stephen
AU  - Burgess S
AD  - From the Centre for Naturally Randomized Trials (B.A.F., T.B.F.), Medical
      Research Council, British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit,
      Department of Public Health and Primary Care (B.A.F., S.B., C.O.-W., A.M.W.,
      A.S.B., E.D.A., J.D.), Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit (S.B.), and
      NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit in Donor Health and Genomics (A.S.B.,
      E.D.A., J.D.), University of Cambridge, Cambridge, and Imperial Centre for
      Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, 
      School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London (K.K.R.) - all in the
      United Kingdom; the Department of Pharmacologic and Biomolecular Sciences,
      University of Milan and Multimedica IRCCS, Milan (A.L.C.); Michigan State
      University, East Lansing (D.R.N.); the Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic 
      Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (J.J.P.K.); and Monash
      University, Clayton, VIC, Australia (S.J.N.).
FAU - Neff, David R
AU  - Neff DR
AD  - From the Centre for Naturally Randomized Trials (B.A.F., T.B.F.), Medical
      Research Council, British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit,
      Department of Public Health and Primary Care (B.A.F., S.B., C.O.-W., A.M.W.,
      A.S.B., E.D.A., J.D.), Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit (S.B.), and
      NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit in Donor Health and Genomics (A.S.B.,
      E.D.A., J.D.), University of Cambridge, Cambridge, and Imperial Centre for
      Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, 
      School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London (K.K.R.) - all in the
      United Kingdom; the Department of Pharmacologic and Biomolecular Sciences,
      University of Milan and Multimedica IRCCS, Milan (A.L.C.); Michigan State
      University, East Lansing (D.R.N.); the Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic 
      Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (J.J.P.K.); and Monash
      University, Clayton, VIC, Australia (S.J.N.).
FAU - Oliver-Williams, Clare
AU  - Oliver-Williams C
AD  - From the Centre for Naturally Randomized Trials (B.A.F., T.B.F.), Medical
      Research Council, British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit,
      Department of Public Health and Primary Care (B.A.F., S.B., C.O.-W., A.M.W.,
      A.S.B., E.D.A., J.D.), Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit (S.B.), and
      NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit in Donor Health and Genomics (A.S.B.,
      E.D.A., J.D.), University of Cambridge, Cambridge, and Imperial Centre for
      Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, 
      School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London (K.K.R.) - all in the
      United Kingdom; the Department of Pharmacologic and Biomolecular Sciences,
      University of Milan and Multimedica IRCCS, Milan (A.L.C.); Michigan State
      University, East Lansing (D.R.N.); the Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic 
      Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (J.J.P.K.); and Monash
      University, Clayton, VIC, Australia (S.J.N.).
FAU - Wood, Angela M
AU  - Wood AM
AD  - From the Centre for Naturally Randomized Trials (B.A.F., T.B.F.), Medical
      Research Council, British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit,
      Department of Public Health and Primary Care (B.A.F., S.B., C.O.-W., A.M.W.,
      A.S.B., E.D.A., J.D.), Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit (S.B.), and
      NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit in Donor Health and Genomics (A.S.B.,
      E.D.A., J.D.), University of Cambridge, Cambridge, and Imperial Centre for
      Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, 
      School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London (K.K.R.) - all in the
      United Kingdom; the Department of Pharmacologic and Biomolecular Sciences,
      University of Milan and Multimedica IRCCS, Milan (A.L.C.); Michigan State
      University, East Lansing (D.R.N.); the Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic 
      Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (J.J.P.K.); and Monash
      University, Clayton, VIC, Australia (S.J.N.).
FAU - Butterworth, Adam S
AU  - Butterworth AS
AD  - From the Centre for Naturally Randomized Trials (B.A.F., T.B.F.), Medical
      Research Council, British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit,
      Department of Public Health and Primary Care (B.A.F., S.B., C.O.-W., A.M.W.,
      A.S.B., E.D.A., J.D.), Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit (S.B.), and
      NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit in Donor Health and Genomics (A.S.B.,
      E.D.A., J.D.), University of Cambridge, Cambridge, and Imperial Centre for
      Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, 
      School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London (K.K.R.) - all in the
      United Kingdom; the Department of Pharmacologic and Biomolecular Sciences,
      University of Milan and Multimedica IRCCS, Milan (A.L.C.); Michigan State
      University, East Lansing (D.R.N.); the Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic 
      Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (J.J.P.K.); and Monash
      University, Clayton, VIC, Australia (S.J.N.).
FAU - Di Angelantonio, Emanuele
AU  - Di Angelantonio E
AD  - From the Centre for Naturally Randomized Trials (B.A.F., T.B.F.), Medical
      Research Council, British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit,
      Department of Public Health and Primary Care (B.A.F., S.B., C.O.-W., A.M.W.,
      A.S.B., E.D.A., J.D.), Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit (S.B.), and
      NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit in Donor Health and Genomics (A.S.B.,
      E.D.A., J.D.), University of Cambridge, Cambridge, and Imperial Centre for
      Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, 
      School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London (K.K.R.) - all in the
      United Kingdom; the Department of Pharmacologic and Biomolecular Sciences,
      University of Milan and Multimedica IRCCS, Milan (A.L.C.); Michigan State
      University, East Lansing (D.R.N.); the Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic 
      Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (J.J.P.K.); and Monash
      University, Clayton, VIC, Australia (S.J.N.).
FAU - Danesh, John
AU  - Danesh J
AD  - From the Centre for Naturally Randomized Trials (B.A.F., T.B.F.), Medical
      Research Council, British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit,
      Department of Public Health and Primary Care (B.A.F., S.B., C.O.-W., A.M.W.,
      A.S.B., E.D.A., J.D.), Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit (S.B.), and
      NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit in Donor Health and Genomics (A.S.B.,
      E.D.A., J.D.), University of Cambridge, Cambridge, and Imperial Centre for
      Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, 
      School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London (K.K.R.) - all in the
      United Kingdom; the Department of Pharmacologic and Biomolecular Sciences,
      University of Milan and Multimedica IRCCS, Milan (A.L.C.); Michigan State
      University, East Lansing (D.R.N.); the Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic 
      Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (J.J.P.K.); and Monash
      University, Clayton, VIC, Australia (S.J.N.).
FAU - Kastelein, John J P
AU  - Kastelein JJP
AD  - From the Centre for Naturally Randomized Trials (B.A.F., T.B.F.), Medical
      Research Council, British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit,
      Department of Public Health and Primary Care (B.A.F., S.B., C.O.-W., A.M.W.,
      A.S.B., E.D.A., J.D.), Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit (S.B.), and
      NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit in Donor Health and Genomics (A.S.B.,
      E.D.A., J.D.), University of Cambridge, Cambridge, and Imperial Centre for
      Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, 
      School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London (K.K.R.) - all in the
      United Kingdom; the Department of Pharmacologic and Biomolecular Sciences,
      University of Milan and Multimedica IRCCS, Milan (A.L.C.); Michigan State
      University, East Lansing (D.R.N.); the Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic 
      Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (J.J.P.K.); and Monash
      University, Clayton, VIC, Australia (S.J.N.).
FAU - Nicholls, Stephen J
AU  - Nicholls SJ
AD  - From the Centre for Naturally Randomized Trials (B.A.F., T.B.F.), Medical
      Research Council, British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit,
      Department of Public Health and Primary Care (B.A.F., S.B., C.O.-W., A.M.W.,
      A.S.B., E.D.A., J.D.), Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit (S.B.), and
      NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit in Donor Health and Genomics (A.S.B.,
      E.D.A., J.D.), University of Cambridge, Cambridge, and Imperial Centre for
      Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, 
      School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London (K.K.R.) - all in the
      United Kingdom; the Department of Pharmacologic and Biomolecular Sciences,
      University of Milan and Multimedica IRCCS, Milan (A.L.C.); Michigan State
      University, East Lansing (D.R.N.); the Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic 
      Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (J.J.P.K.); and Monash
      University, Clayton, VIC, Australia (S.J.N.).
LA  - eng
GR  - Investigator Initiated Grant Award/NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research
      Centre/International
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL  - United States
TA  - N Engl J Med
JT  - The New England journal of medicine
JID - 0255562
RN  - 0 (Cholesterol, LDL)
RN  - 0 (Dicarboxylic Acids)
RN  - 0 (Fatty Acids)
RN  - 0 (Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors)
RN  - 0 (Hypolipidemic Agents)
RN  - 0 (Lipoproteins)
RN  - 0 (Membrane Proteins)
RN  - 0 (NPC1L1 protein, human)
RN  - 0 (Triglycerides)
RN  - 1EJ6Z6Q368 (8-hydroxy-2,2,14,14-tetramethylpentadecanedioic acid)
RN  - EC 1.1.1.- (HMGCR protein, human)
RN  - EC 1.1.1.- (Hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA Reductases)
RN  - EC 2.3.3.8 (ATP Citrate (pro-S)-Lyase)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - ATP Citrate (pro-S)-Lyase/antagonists & inhibitors/*genetics
MH  - Cardiovascular Diseases/*genetics
MH  - Cholesterol, LDL/*blood
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus/genetics
MH  - Dicarboxylic Acids/pharmacology/therapeutic use
MH  - Fatty Acids/pharmacology/therapeutic use
MH  - Female
MH  - *Genetic Predisposition to Disease
MH  - Humans
MH  - Hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA Reductases/*genetics
MH  - Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology/therapeutic use
MH  - Hypercholesterolemia/drug therapy
MH  - Hypolipidemic Agents/pharmacology/therapeutic use
MH  - Lipoproteins/blood
MH  - Male
MH  - Membrane Proteins/genetics
MH  - *Mendelian Randomization Analysis
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Neoplasms/genetics
MH  - Odds Ratio
MH  - Risk
MH  - Triglycerides/blood
EDAT- 2019/03/14 06:00
MHDA- 2019/03/26 06:00
CRDT- 2019/03/14 06:00
PHST- 2019/03/14 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/03/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/03/26 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1056/NEJMoa1806747 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - N Engl J Med. 2019 Mar 14;380(11):1033-1042. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1806747.