PMID- 28710232
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180101
LR  - 20180101
IS  - 1756-1833 (Electronic)
IS  - 0959-8138 (Linking)
VI  - 358
DP  - 2017 Jul 14
TI  - Young people with diabetes show no drop in admission rates, audit finds.
PG  - j3411
LID - 10.1136/bmj.j3411 [doi]
FAU - Wise, Jacqui
AU  - Wise J
AD  - London.
LA  - eng
PT  - News
DEP - 20170714
PL  - England
TA  - BMJ
JT  - BMJ (Clinical research ed.)
JID - 8900488
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Child
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/*epidemiology/therapy
MH  - England/epidemiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Length of Stay/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Male
MH  - *Medical Audit
MH  - Patient Admission/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - Pediatrics
MH  - Referral and Consultation
EDAT- 2017/07/16 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/02 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/16 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/16 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/07/16 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/02 06:00 [medline]
PST - epublish
SO  - BMJ. 2017 Jul 14;358:j3411.

PMID- 28703926
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180523
LR  - 20180618
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 10
DP  - 2017 Oct
TI  - Difficult conversations: adults with diabetes and the discussion of microvascular
      complications.
PG  - 1447-1455
LID - 10.1111/dme.13419 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To investigate the experiences among adults with diabetes of discussions of
      microvascular complications and provide recommendations for providers. METHODS:
      We performed a qualitative study in 148 adults with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
      (56% women, 95% white, mean age 60+/-13 years, 65% with Type 1 diabetes, 71% with
      >/=1 microvascular complication). Data were analysed using content analysis.
      RESULTS: At their first discussion of microvascular complications, 93% of
      participants (138/148) recalled providers using a preventative approach including
      clinical suggestions, factual information and warnings. At complication
      diagnosis, 78% of participants (82/105) perceived provider support through
      comprehensive interactive education, specific self-care guidance, reassuring
      messages, and referrals and follow-ups. In response to complication diagnosis,
      48% (50/105) felt scared, 46% (48/105) had 'a wake-up call', and 86% (90/105)
      reported increasing >/=1 specific area of self-care. Participants recommended
      providers offer factual and complete information, specific self-care guidance,
      and positive honesty, with an individualized and collaborative approach that
      includes psychosocial assessment and referrals and lacks 'scare tactics' and
      blame. CONCLUSIONS: Adults with diabetes want to learn about diabetes
      microvascular complications and apply preventative strategies as early as
      possible. Paradoxically, the diagnosis of a diabetes microvascular complication
      in itself may represent a unique learning opportunity because 86% of participants
      improved diabetes self-care after this event. Recommendations offer providers
      simple but important clinical approaches to improve these difficult conversations
      and thus support necessary behaviour changes and psychosocial well-being.
      Training is needed to help providers discuss the threat of diabetes complications
      with honest but positive messages so that people with diabetes can be fully
      informed but also maintain hope in the face of complications.
CI  - (c) 2017 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Ritholz, M D
AU  - Ritholz MD
AD  - Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA, USA.
AD  - Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
AD  - Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
FAU - MacNeil, T
AU  - MacNeil T
AD  - Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA, USA.
FAU - Weinger, K
AU  - Weinger K
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-4709-9987
AD  - Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA, USA.
AD  - Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170803
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - *Communication
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/*complications/epidemiology
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*complications/epidemiology
MH  - Diabetic Angiopathies/epidemiology/etiology/*prevention & control
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - *Patient Education as Topic/methods
MH  - Referral and Consultation
MH  - Self Care
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
EDAT- 2017/07/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/24 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/14 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/10 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/24 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13419 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Oct;34(10):1447-1455. doi: 10.1111/dme.13419. Epub 2017 Aug 3.

PMID- 28703902
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180702
LR  - 20180711
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 11
DP  - 2017 Nov
TI  - Prevalence and characteristics of paediatric Type 2 diabetes in the Republic of
      Ireland.
PG  - 1603-1607
LID - 10.1111/dme.13425 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: To establish the prevalence of paediatric Type 2 diabetes in the
      Republic of Ireland and describe patient demographics, initial presentation,
      management, outcomes, comorbidities and complications. METHODS: Using a
      standardized proforma we conducted a cross-sectional survey of children and
      adolescents aged < 16 years with a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes between October
      and December 2015 in each of the 19 centres in the Republic of Ireland
      responsible for the care of children with diabetes. RESULTS: Twelve cases of Type
      2 diabetes were identified, giving a prevalence in children aged <16 years of
      1.2/100 000 (95% CI 0.6 to 2). Six of these children (50%) were white, two (33%) 
      of whom were members of the travelling community. Four (33%) were of black
      ethnicity. The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in traveller children was 16.1/100
      000 (95% CI 1.9 to 58.1) and was similar to that in black children, a known
      high-risk group, which was 13.3/100 000 (95% CI 3.6 to 34.1). The median current 
      HbA1c value was 51 mmol/mol (6.8%) and four (33%) of the children achieved the
      International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes target HbA1c of </=48
      mmol/mol (6.5%). Seven (59%) children were managed on metformin monotherapy,
      three (25%) were managed on insulin and metformin in combination, and two (16%)
      were receiving dietary management. CONCLUSION: This was the first national study 
      to estimate the prevalence of childhood Type 2 diabetes in Ireland. Despite their
      white ethnicity, traveller children appear to be a high-risk group, but this
      finding requires further study.
CI  - (c) 2017 Diabetes UK.
FAU - O'Dea, M I
AU  - O'Dea MI
AD  - Department of Paediatrics, Midland Regional Hospital, Mullingar, Co, Westmeath.
FAU - O'Connell, S M
AU  - O'Connell SM
AD  - Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Cork University Hospital, Wilton,
      Cork, Ireland.
FAU - O'Grady, M J
AU  - O'Grady MJ
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-5997-0560
AD  - Department of Paediatrics, Midland Regional Hospital, Mullingar, Co, Westmeath.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170803
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
RN  - 0 (Hypoglycemic Agents)
RN  - 0 (Insulin)
RN  - 9100L32L2N (Metformin)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Child
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*drug therapy/*epidemiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Hypoglycemic Agents/*therapeutic use
MH  - Infant
MH  - Insulin/therapeutic use
MH  - Ireland/epidemiology
MH  - Male
MH  - Metformin/therapeutic use
MH  - Prevalence
EDAT- 2017/07/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/03 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/14 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/10 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/03 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13425 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Nov;34(11):1603-1607. doi: 10.1111/dme.13425. Epub 2017 Aug 3.

PMID- 28703888
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180702
LR  - 20180711
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 11
DP  - 2017 Nov
TI  - Individual and partner's level of occupation and the association with HbA1c
      levels in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Dutch Diabetes Pearl cohort.
PG  - 1623-1628
LID - 10.1111/dme.13422 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: Individual indicators of socio-economic status have been associated with
      glycaemic control in people with Type 2 diabetes, but little is known about the
      association between partner's socio-economic status and HbA1c levels. We
      therefore examined the cross-sectional association between individual and
      partner's level of occupation on HbA1c levels in people with Type 2 diabetes in
      the Netherlands. METHODS: We included people with Type 2 diabetes with a partner 
      who were treated in primary, secondary and tertiary care in the Diabetes Pearl
      cohort. Occupational level was classified according to International Standard
      Classification of Occupations (ISCO)-08 skill levels. Linear regression analyses 
      were performed stratified for sex, and corrected for age, recruitment centre and 
      diabetes medication. RESULTS: In total, 3257 participants (59.8% men, mean
      62.2+/-9.4 years) were included. For men, having a partner with an intermediate
      level of occupation was associated with lower HbA1c levels [e.g. ISCO level 3: -2
      mmol/mol (95% CI -4;-1) or -0.2% (95% CI -0.4;-0.1)], compared with having a
      partner of the highest occupational level (ISCO level 4). In women, having an
      unemployed partner was associated with higher HbA1c levels [14 mmol/mol (95% CI
      6; 22) or 1.3% (95% CI 0.6; 2.0)], compared with having a partner of the highest 
      occupational level. CONCLUSIONS: Partner's occupational status provided
      additional information on the association between socio-economic status and HbA1c
      levels in people with Type 2 diabetes. Women seemed to benefit from a partner
      with a higher occupational status, while men seemed to benefit from a partner
      with a lower status. Because of the cross-sectional nature of the present study, 
      more research is necessary to explore this association.
CI  - (c) 2017 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Rutte, A
AU  - Rutte A
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-5016-6733
AD  - Department of General Practice and Elderly Care Medicine, Amsterdam Public Health
      Research Institute, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
FAU - Rauh, S P
AU  - Rauh SP
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam Public Health Research
      Institute, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
FAU - Schram, M T
AU  - Schram MT
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre+,
      Maastricht, The Netherlands.
AD  - Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University Medical
      Centre+, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
FAU - Nijpels, G
AU  - Nijpels G
AD  - Department of General Practice and Elderly Care Medicine, Amsterdam Public Health
      Research Institute, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
FAU - DeVries, J H
AU  - DeVries JH
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Amsterdam,
      The Netherlands.
FAU - Holleman, F
AU  - Holleman F
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Amsterdam,
      The Netherlands.
FAU - Pijl, H
AU  - Pijl H
AD  - Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Leiden University Medical Centre,
      Leiden, The Netherlands.
FAU - Dekkers, O M
AU  - Dekkers OM
AD  - Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Leiden University Medical Centre,
      Leiden, The Netherlands.
FAU - Ozcan, B
AU  - Ozcan B
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam,
      The Netherlands.
FAU - Sijbrands, E J G
AU  - Sijbrands EJG
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam,
      The Netherlands.
FAU - Tack, C J
AU  - Tack CJ
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre,
      Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
FAU - Abbink, E J
AU  - Abbink EJ
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre,
      Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
FAU - de Valk, H W
AU  - de Valk HW
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The 
      Netherlands.
FAU - Silvius, B
AU  - Silvius B
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The 
      Netherlands.
FAU - Wolffenbuttel, B H R
AU  - Wolffenbuttel BHR
AD  - Department of Endocrinology, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre
      Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
FAU - Stehouwer, C D A
AU  - Stehouwer CDA
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre+,
      Maastricht, The Netherlands.
AD  - Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University Medical
      Centre+, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
FAU - Schaper, N C
AU  - Schaper NC
AD  - Department of Endocrinology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht,
      The Netherlands.
AD  - School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University Medical Centre, 
      Maastricht, The Netherlands.
FAU - Dekker, J M
AU  - Dekker JM
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam Public Health Research
      Institute, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
FAU - Beulens, J W
AU  - Beulens JW
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam Public Health Research
      Institute, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
AD  - Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre
      Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
FAU - Elders, P J M
AU  - Elders PJM
AD  - Department of General Practice and Elderly Care Medicine, Amsterdam Public Health
      Research Institute, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
FAU - Rutters, F
AU  - Rutters F
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam Public Health Research
      Institute, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
CN  - Diabetes Pearl from the Parelsnoer Initiative
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170803
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
RN  - 0 (Blood Glucose)
RN  - 0 (Glycated Hemoglobin A)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - Blood Glucose/analysis
MH  - Cohort Studies
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*blood/*epidemiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Glycated Hemoglobin A/*analysis
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Netherlands/epidemiology
MH  - *Occupations/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Social Class
MH  - Social Support
MH  - *Spouses/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/07/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/03 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/14 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/10 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/03 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13422 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Nov;34(11):1623-1628. doi: 10.1111/dme.13422. Epub 2017 Aug 3.

PMID- 28703868
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180523
LR  - 20180618
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 10
DP  - 2017 Oct
TI  - Cardiac vagal tone, a non-invasive measure of parasympathetic tone, is a
      clinically relevant tool in Type 1 diabetes mellitus.
PG  - 1428-1434
LID - 10.1111/dme.13421 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To compare a novel index of parasympathetic tone, cardiac vagal tone, with 
      established autonomic variables and to test the hypotheses that (1) cardiac vagal
      tone would be associated with established time and frequency domain measures of
      heart rate and (2) cardiac vagal tone would be lower in people with Type 1
      diabetes than in a matched healthy cohort and lower still in people with
      established neuropathy. METHODS: Cardiac vagal tone is a validated
      cardiometrically derived index of parasympathetic tone. It is measured using a
      standard three-lead electrocardiogram which connects, via Bluetooth, to a
      smartphone application. A 5-min resting recording of cardiac vagal tone was
      undertaken and observational comparisons were made between 42 people with Type 1 
      diabetes and peripheral neuropathy and 23 without peripheral neuropathy and 65
      healthy people. In those with neuropathy, 24-h heart rate variability values were
      compared with cardiac vagal tone. Correlations between cardiac vagal tone and
      clinical variables were also made. RESULTS: Cardiac vagal tone was lower in
      people with established neuropathy and Type 1 diabetes in comparison with healthy
      participants [median (interquartile range) linear vagal scale 3.4 (1.6-5.5 vs 7.0
      (5.5-9.6); P < 0.0001]. Cardiac vagal tone was positively associated with time (r
      = 0.8, P < 0.0001) and frequency domain markers of heart rate variability (r =
      0.75, P < 0.0001), representing established measures of parasympathetic function.
      Cardiac vagal tone was negatively associated with age (r=-0.32, P = 0.003),
      disease duration (r=-0.43, P < 0.0001) and cardiovascular risk score (r=-0.32, P 
      = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Cardiac vagal tone represents a convenient, clinically
      relevant method of assessing parasympathetic nervous system tone, potentially
      facilitating the earlier identification of people with Type 1 diabetes who should
      undergo formal autonomic function testing.
CI  - (c) 2017 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Brock, C
AU  - Brock C
AD  - Department of Mech-Sense, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology and
      Clinical Institute, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
AD  - Department of Pharmacotherapy and Development, University of Copenhagen,
      Copenhagen.
AD  - Department of Rheumatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus.
FAU - Jessen, N
AU  - Jessen N
AD  - Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus.
AD  - Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus.
AD  - Department of Biomedicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus.
FAU - Brock, B
AU  - Brock B
AD  - Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus.
AD  - Department of Biochemistry, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus.
FAU - Jakobsen, P E
AU  - Jakobsen PE
AD  - Department of Endocrinology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
FAU - Hansen, T K
AU  - Hansen TK
AD  - Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital,
      Aarhus.
FAU - Rantanen, J M
AU  - Rantanen JM
AD  - Department of Nephrology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
AD  - Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
FAU - Riahi, S
AU  - Riahi S
AD  - Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
FAU - Dimitrova, Y K
AU  - Dimitrova YK
AD  - Department of Mech-Sense, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology and
      Clinical Institute, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
FAU - Dons-Jensen, A
AU  - Dons-Jensen A
AD  - Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital,
      Aarhus.
FAU - Aziz, Q
AU  - Aziz Q
AD  - Centre for Neuroscience and Trauma, Wingate Institute of Neurogastroenterology,
      Blizard Institute, London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University
      of London, London.
FAU - Drewes, A M
AU  - Drewes AM
AD  - Department of Mech-Sense, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology and
      Clinical Institute, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
FAU - Farmer, A D
AU  - Farmer AD
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-1902-2640
AD  - Department of Mech-Sense, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology and
      Clinical Institute, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
AD  - Centre for Neuroscience and Trauma, Wingate Institute of Neurogastroenterology,
      Blizard Institute, London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University
      of London, London.
AD  - Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospitals of North Midlands, Stoke on 
      Trent, Staffordshire, UK.
LA  - eng
GR  - G0600965/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom
GR  - G0701706/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170817
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Cardiovascular Diseases/*diagnosis/physiopathology
MH  - Case-Control Studies
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/*complications/diagnosis/*physiopathology
MH  - Diabetic Angiopathies/*diagnosis/physiopathology
MH  - Diabetic Neuropathies/*diagnosis/physiopathology
MH  - Female
MH  - Heart Rate/physiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Parasympathetic Nervous System/*physiopathology
MH  - Predictive Value of Tests
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Vagus Nerve/*physiopathology
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/07/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/24 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/14 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/10 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/24 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13421 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Oct;34(10):1428-1434. doi: 10.1111/dme.13421. Epub 2017 Aug 17.

PMID- 28703867
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180702
LR  - 20180711
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 11
DP  - 2017 Nov
TI  - Diabetes and risk of occupational injury: a cohort study.
PG  - 1629-1636
LID - 10.1111/dme.13423 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To investigate if diabetes is associated with a higher risk of occupational
      (workplace or commuting) injury. METHODS: Medication data from the Finnish
      Prescription Register were used to identify diabetes cases in 2004 in a large
      employee cohort (the Finnish Public Sector study). These data were linked to
      injury records obtained from the Federation of Accident Insurance Institutions. A
      total of 1020 diabetes cases (median age 52 years, range 20 to 65 years; 66%
      women) and their 5234 age- and sex-matched controls were followed up until 2011. 
      Sex-stratified Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for age, occupational
      status, obesity and health behaviours, were applied. Because of the small number 
      of men in the cohort, injury types and locations were only examined among women. 
      RESULTS: During the median follow-up of 6.7 years, 25% of the participants with
      diabetes (n=252) and 20% of those without (n=1051) experienced an occupational
      injury. The association between diabetes and injury was stronger in women than
      men (P=0.048). Diabetes was associated with a higher risk of workplace (hazard
      ratio 1.37, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.69) and commuting (hazard ratio 1.36, 95% CI 1.03 to
      1.79) injury in women. With regard to different injury types and locations,
      diabetes was associated with bone fractures, dislocations, sprains and strains,
      and injuries to upper and lower extremities. In men, there was an association
      between insulin-treated diabetes and commuting injury (hazard ratio 3.14, 95% CI 
      1.52 to 6.49). CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes was associated with workplace and commuting 
      injuries in women. Men with insulin-treated diabetes had a higher risk of
      commuting injuries.
CI  - (c) 2017 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on
      behalf of Diabetes UK.
FAU - Kouvonen, A
AU  - Kouvonen A
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-6997-8312
AD  - Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
AD  - Administrative Data Research Centre - Northern Ireland, Centre for Public Health,
      Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK.
AD  - SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities in Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland.
FAU - Kivimaki, M
AU  - Kivimaki M
AD  - Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Turku and Helsinki, Finland.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, 
      UK.
AD  - Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
FAU - Pentti, J
AU  - Pentti J
AD  - Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
FAU - Aalto, V
AU  - Aalto V
AD  - Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Turku and Helsinki, Finland.
FAU - Oksanen, T
AU  - Oksanen T
AD  - Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Turku and Helsinki, Finland.
FAU - Virtanen, M
AU  - Virtanen M
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-8361-3301
AD  - Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Turku and Helsinki, Finland.
FAU - Vahtera, J
AU  - Vahtera J
AD  - Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital,
      Turku, Finland.
LA  - eng
GR  - MR/K013351/1/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170814
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Case-Control Studies
MH  - Cohort Studies
MH  - Diabetes Complications/*epidemiology
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus/*epidemiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Finland/epidemiology
MH  - Follow-Up Studies
MH  - Humans
MH  - Leisure Activities
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Occupational Injuries/*epidemiology/etiology
MH  - Occupations/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Workplace/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Young Adult
EDAT- 2017/07/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/07/03 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/14 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/10 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/07/03 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13423 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Nov;34(11):1629-1636. doi: 10.1111/dme.13423. Epub 2017 Aug 14.

PMID- 28703863
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180523
LR  - 20180618
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 34
IP  - 10
DP  - 2017 Oct
TI  - Effect of sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors on impaired ventricular
      repolarization in people with Type 2 diabetes.
PG  - 1367-1371
LID - 10.1111/dme.13424 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To test the hypothesis that treatment with a sodium-glucose
      co-transporter-2 inhibitor would reverse ventricular repolarization
      heterogeneity, a predictor of cardiovascular mortality, in people with Type 2
      diabetes. METHODS: We retrospectively analysed changes in indices of ventricular 
      repolarization before and after treatment with a sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 
      inhibitor in 46 people with Type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: Sodium-glucose
      co-transporter-2 inhibitor treatment reduced HbA1c concentration [62+/-13
      mmol/mol (7.7+/-1.2%) vs 59+/-16 mmol/mol (7.5+/-1.4%)], body weight (77.8+/-13.9
      vs 74.7+/-12.5 kg) and systolic blood pressure (133+/-18 vs 126+/-12 mmHg) in the
      study participants. Heart rate and QTc interval were not changed by
      sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitor treatment, but QTc dispersion was
      significantly reduced (median, 48.8 vs 44.2 ms). Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 
      inhibitor treatment reversed QTc dispersion more in participants who had larger
      QTc dispersion before the treatment. Changes in systolic blood pressure
      (Spearman's rho= 0.319; P=0.031), but not in HbA1c concentration, were correlated
      with changes in QTc dispersion after sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitor
      treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that sodium-glucose co-transporter-2
      inhibitor treatment reverses ventricular repolarization heterogeneity in people
      with Type 2 diabetes, independently of its effect on glycaemic control. The
      favourable effect on ventricular repolarization heterogeneity could be the
      mechanism by which empaglifozin reduced cardiovascular events in a recent study.
CI  - (c) 2017 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Sato, T
AU  - Sato T
AD  - Department of Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.
FAU - Miki, T
AU  - Miki T
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-3104-4925
AD  - Department of Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.
FAU - Ohnishi, H
AU  - Ohnishi H
AD  - Department of Public Health, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine,
      Sapporo, Japan.
FAU - Yamashita, T
AU  - Yamashita T
AD  - Department of Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.
FAU - Takada, A
AU  - Takada A
AD  - Department of Cardiology, Steel Memorial Muroran Hospital, Muroran, Japan.
FAU - Yano, T
AU  - Yano T
AD  - Department of Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.
FAU - Tanno, M
AU  - Tanno M
AD  - Department of Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.
FAU - Tsuchida, A
AU  - Tsuchida A
AD  - Department of Cardiology, JR Sapporo Hospital, Sapporo, Japan.
FAU - Miura, T
AU  - Miura T
AD  - Department of Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170803
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
RN  - 0 (Hypoglycemic Agents)
RN  - 0 (SLC5A2 protein, human)
RN  - 0 (Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications/*drug therapy
MH  - Diabetic Angiopathies/*drug therapy
MH  - Female
MH  - Heart Rate/drug effects
MH  - Humans
MH  - Hypoglycemic Agents/*therapeutic use
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Retrospective Studies
MH  - Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2/*antagonists & inhibitors
MH  - Treatment Outcome
MH  - Ventricular Dysfunction/*drug therapy/etiology
EDAT- 2017/07/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/05/24 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/14 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/10 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/05/24 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13424 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2017 Oct;34(10):1367-1371. doi: 10.1111/dme.13424. Epub 2017 Aug 3.

PMID- 28705834
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180301
LR  - 20180426
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 40
IP  - 9
DP  - 2017 Sep
TI  - Visit-to-Visit Variations in Fasting Plasma Glucose and HbA1c Associated With an 
      Increased Risk of Alzheimer Disease: Taiwan Diabetes Study.
PG  - 1210-1217
LID - 10.2337/dc16-2238 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: The relationship between glycemic variability and the incidence of
      Alzheimer disease (AD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is
      unclear. The aim of this study was to examine visit-to-visit variations in
      fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) represented by the
      coefficient of variation (CV) and to determine whether they were independently
      associated with AD, irrespective of HbA1c and other traditional risk factors in
      such patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Patients with T2DM enrolled in the
      National Diabetes Care Management Program, age >/=60 years, and without diagnosis
      of AD (n = 16,706) were included in the study. Potential risk factors were
      analyzed using extended Cox proportional hazards regression models for competing 
      risk of mortality on AD incidence. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 8.88
      years, 831 incident cases of AD were identified, with a crude incidence rate of
      3.5/1,000 person-years. After adjustment for sociodemographic factors, lifestyle 
      behaviors, diabetes-related variables, FPG and HbA1c, drug-related variables, and
      comorbidities, both FPG CV and HbA1c CV were found to be significant predictors
      of AD, with corresponding hazard ratios of 1.27 (95% CI 1.06-1.52) for the third 
      tertile in FPG CV and 1.32 (95% CI 1.11-1.58) for the third tertile in HbA1c CV. 
      CONCLUSIONS: FPG CV and HbA1c CV are independently associated with AD. The
      associations between glycemic variability and AD demonstrated in this study
      suggest a linked pathophysiological mechanism, which is worthy of further
      investigation. Further research is required to confirm our results and to
      evaluate whether FPG CV and HbA1c CV can be valuable therapeutic targets for
      patients with T2DM at risk.
CI  - (c) 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Li, Tsai-Chung
AU  - Li TC
AD  - Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, China Medical University, 
      Taichung, Taiwan.
AD  - Department of Healthcare Administration, College of Medical and Health Science,
      Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan.
FAU - Yang, Chun-Pai
AU  - Yang CP
AD  - Department of Neurology, Kuang Tien General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
AD  - Department of Nutrition, Hungkuang University, Taichung, Taiwan.
FAU - Tseng, Shih-Ting
AU  - Tseng ST
AD  - Department of Food and Nutrition, Providence University, Taichung, Taiwan.
AD  - Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kuang Tien General Hospital,
      Taichung, Taiwan.
FAU - Li, Chia-Ing
AU  - Li CI
AD  - Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung,
      Taiwan.
AD  - School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung,
      Taiwan.
FAU - Liu, Chiu-Shong
AU  - Liu CS
AD  - Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung,
      Taiwan.
AD  - School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung,
      Taiwan.
AD  - Department of Family Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung,
      Taiwan.
FAU - Lin, Wen-Yuan
AU  - Lin WY
AD  - School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung,
      Taiwan.
AD  - Department of Family Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung,
      Taiwan.
FAU - Hwang, Kai-Lin
AU  - Hwang KL
AD  - Department of Public Health, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
FAU - Yang, Sing-Yu
AU  - Yang SY
AD  - Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, China Medical University, 
      Taichung, Taiwan.
FAU - Chiang, Jen-Huai
AU  - Chiang JH
AD  - Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung,
      Taiwan.
FAU - Lin, Cheng-Chieh
AU  - Lin CC
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-9625-6216
AD  - Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung,
      Taiwan cclin@mail.cmuh.org.tw.
AD  - School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung,
      Taiwan.
AD  - Department of Family Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung,
      Taiwan.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170713
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
RN  - 0 (Blood Glucose)
RN  - 0 (Glycated Hemoglobin A)
SB  - IM
MH  - Aged
MH  - Alzheimer Disease/blood/diagnosis/*epidemiology
MH  - Blood Glucose/*analysis
MH  - Comorbidity
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood/*epidemiology
MH  - *Fasting
MH  - Female
MH  - Follow-Up Studies
MH  - Glycated Hemoglobin A/*analysis
MH  - Humans
MH  - Incidence
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Proportional Hazards Models
MH  - Retrospective Studies
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Socioeconomic Factors
MH  - Taiwan/epidemiology
EDAT- 2017/07/15 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/02 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/15 06:00
PHST- 2016/10/18 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/06/19 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/07/15 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/02 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/15 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc16-2238 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc16-2238 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2017 Sep;40(9):1210-1217. doi: 10.2337/dc16-2238. Epub 2017 Jul
      13.

PMID- 28705833
OWN - NLM
STAT- PubMed-not-MEDLINE
LR  - 20180710
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 40
IP  - 9
DP  - 2017 Sep
TI  - Erratum. Diabetic Retinopathy: A Position Statement by the American Diabetes
      Association. Diabetes Care 2017;40:412-418.
PG  - 1285
LID - 10.2337/dc17-er09 [doi]
FAU - Solomon, Sharon D
AU  - Solomon SD
FAU - Chew, Emily
AU  - Chew E
FAU - Duh, Elia J
AU  - Duh EJ
FAU - Sobrin, Lucia
AU  - Sobrin L
FAU - Sun, Jennifer K
AU  - Sun JK
FAU - VanderBeek, Brian L
AU  - VanderBeek BL
FAU - Wykoff, Charles C
AU  - Wykoff CC
FAU - Gardner, Thomas W
AU  - Gardner TW
LA  - eng
GR  - K23 EY025729/EY/NEI NIH HHS/United States
GR  - P30 DK036836/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Published Erratum
DEP - 20170713
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EFR - Diabetes Care. 2017 Mar;40(3):412-418. PMID: 28223445
PMC - PMC5566277
EDAT- 2017/07/15 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/15 06:01
CRDT- 2017/07/15 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/15 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/07/15 06:01 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/15 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc17-er09 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc17-er09 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2017 Sep;40(9):1285. doi: 10.2337/dc17-er09. Epub 2017 Jul 13.

PMID- 28701371
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180130
LR  - 20180502
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 40
IP  - 8
DP  - 2017 Aug
TI  - Population-Based Assessment of a Biomarker-Based Screening Pathway to Aid
      Diagnosis of Monogenic Diabetes in Young-Onset Patients.
PG  - 1017-1025
LID - 10.2337/dc17-0224 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Monogenic diabetes, a young-onset form of diabetes, is often
      misdiagnosed as type 1 diabetes, resulting in unnecessary treatment with insulin.
      A screening approach for monogenic diabetes is needed to accurately select
      suitable patients for expensive diagnostic genetic testing. We used C-peptide and
      islet autoantibodies, highly sensitive and specific biomarkers for discriminating
      type 1 from non-type 1 diabetes, in a biomarker screening pathway for monogenic
      diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We studied patients diagnosed at age 30
      years or younger, currently younger than 50 years, in two U.K. regions with
      existing high detection of monogenic diabetes. The biomarker screening pathway
      comprised three stages: 1) assessment of endogenous insulin secretion using
      urinary C-peptide/creatinine ratio (UCPCR); 2) if UCPCR was >/=0.2 nmol/mmol,
      measurement of GAD and IA2 islet autoantibodies; and 3) if negative for both
      autoantibodies, molecular genetic diagnostic testing for 35 monogenic diabetes
      subtypes. RESULTS: A total of 1,407 patients participated (1,365 with no known
      genetic cause, 34 with monogenic diabetes, and 8 with cystic fibrosis-related
      diabetes). A total of 386 out of 1,365 (28%) patients had a UCPCR >/=0.2
      nmol/mmol, and 216 out of 386 (56%) were negative for GAD and IA2 and underwent
      molecular genetic testing. Seventeen new cases of monogenic diabetes were
      diagnosed (8 common Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young [Sanger sequencing] and 
      9 rarer causes [next-generation sequencing]) in addition to the 34 known cases
      (estimated prevalence of 3.6% [51/1,407] [95% CI 2.7-4.7%]). The positive
      predictive value was 20%, suggesting a 1-in-5 detection rate for the pathway. The
      negative predictive value was 99.9%. CONCLUSIONS: The biomarker screening pathway
      for monogenic diabetes is an effective, cheap, and easily implemented approach to
      systematically screening all young-onset patients. The minimum prevalence of
      monogenic diabetes is 3.6% of patients diagnosed at age 30 years or younger.
CI  - (c) 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Shields, Beverley M
AU  - Shields BM
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-3785-327X
AD  - Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Science, University of Exeter Medical
      School, Exeter, U.K.
AD  - NIHR Exeter Clinical Research Facility, Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation
      Trust, Exeter, U.K.
FAU - Shepherd, Maggie
AU  - Shepherd M
AD  - Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Science, University of Exeter Medical
      School, Exeter, U.K.
AD  - NIHR Exeter Clinical Research Facility, Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation
      Trust, Exeter, U.K.
FAU - Hudson, Michelle
AU  - Hudson M
AD  - Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Science, University of Exeter Medical
      School, Exeter, U.K.
FAU - McDonald, Timothy J
AU  - McDonald TJ
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-3559-6660
AD  - Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Science, University of Exeter Medical
      School, Exeter, U.K.
AD  - Blood Sciences, Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust, Exeter, U.K.
FAU - Colclough, Kevin
AU  - Colclough K
AD  - Molecular Genetics Diagnostic Laboratory, Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation
      Trust, Exeter, U.K.
FAU - Peters, Jaime
AU  - Peters J
AD  - Exeter Test Group, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, U.K.
FAU - Knight, Bridget
AU  - Knight B
AD  - Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Science, University of Exeter Medical
      School, Exeter, U.K.
AD  - NIHR Exeter Clinical Research Facility, Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation
      Trust, Exeter, U.K.
FAU - Hyde, Chris
AU  - Hyde C
AD  - Exeter Test Group, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, U.K.
FAU - Ellard, Sian
AU  - Ellard S
AD  - Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Science, University of Exeter Medical
      School, Exeter, U.K.
AD  - Molecular Genetics Diagnostic Laboratory, Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation
      Trust, Exeter, U.K.
FAU - Pearson, Ewan R
AU  - Pearson ER
AD  - Division of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, University of
      Dundee, Dundee, U.K.
FAU - Hattersley, Andrew T
AU  - Hattersley AT
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-5620-473X
AD  - Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Science, University of Exeter Medical
      School, Exeter, U.K. a.t.hattersley@exeter.ac.uk.
AD  - NIHR Exeter Clinical Research Facility, Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation
      Trust, Exeter, U.K.
CN  - UNITED study team
LA  - eng
SI  - ClinicalTrials.gov/NCT01238380
GR  - NF-SI-0611-10219/Department of Health/United Kingdom
GR  - 098395/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom
GR  - NIHR-HCS-P12-03-03/Department of Health/United Kingdom
GR  - RDECRF-2012-1/Department of Health/United Kingdom
GR  - Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
RN  - 0 (Autoantibodies)
RN  - 0 (Biomarkers)
RN  - 0 (C-Peptide)
RN  - 0 (HNF1A protein, human)
RN  - 0 (HNF4A protein, human)
RN  - 0 (Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1-alpha)
RN  - 0 (Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4)
RN  - 0 (ICA512 autoantibody)
RN  - 0 (Insulin)
RN  - AYI8EX34EU (Creatinine)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Autoantibodies/blood
MH  - Biomarkers/*blood/*urine
MH  - C-Peptide/urine
MH  - Cohort Studies
MH  - Creatinine/urine
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/diagnosis/*epidemiology/genetics
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis/*epidemiology/genetics
MH  - Female
MH  - Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1-alpha/genetics/metabolism
MH  - Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4/genetics/metabolism
MH  - High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
MH  - Humans
MH  - Insulin/blood/therapeutic use
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - Sensitivity and Specificity
MH  - Sequence Analysis, DNA
MH  - United Kingdom
PMC - PMC5570522
MID - EMS72556
EDAT- 2017/07/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/31 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/14 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/30 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/04/26 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/31 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc17-0224 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc17-0224 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2017 Aug;40(8):1017-1025. doi: 10.2337/dc17-0224.

PMID- 28701370
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180130
LR  - 20180426
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 40
IP  - 8
DP  - 2017 Aug
TI  - Twenty-Year Progression Rate to Clinical Onset According to Autoantibody Profile,
      Age, and HLA-DQ Genotype in a Registry-Based Group of Children and Adults With a 
      First-Degree Relative With Type 1 Diabetes.
PG  - 1065-1072
LID - 10.2337/dc16-2228 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether islet autoantibody profile, HLA-DQ genotype,
      and age influenced a 20-year progression to diabetes from first autoantibody
      positivity (autoAb(+)) in first-degree relatives of patients with type 1
      diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Persistently islet autoAb(+) siblings and 
      offspring (n = 462) under 40 years of age were followed by the Belgian Diabetes
      Registry. AutoAbs against insulin (IAA), GAD (GADA), IA-2 antigen (IA-2A), and
      zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8A) were determined by radiobinding assay. RESULTS: The
      20-year progression rate of multiple-autoAb(+) relatives (n = 194) was higher
      than that for single-autoAb(+) participants (n = 268) (88% vs. 54%; P < 0.001).
      Relatives positive for IAA and GADA (n = 54) progressed more slowly than
      double-autoAb(+) individuals carrying IA-2A and/or ZnT8A (n = 38; P = 0.001). In 
      multiple-autoAb(+) relatives, Cox regression analysis identified the presence of 
      IA-2A or ZnT8A as the only independent predictors of more rapid progression to
      diabetes (P < 0.001); in single-autoAb(+) relatives, it identified younger age (P
      < 0.001), HLA-DQ2/DQ8 genotype (P < 0.001), and IAA (P = 0.028) as independent
      predictors of seroconversion to multiple positivity for autoAbs. In
      time-dependent Cox regression, younger age (P = 0.042), HLA-DQ2/DQ8 genotype (P =
      0.009), and the development of additional autoAbs (P = 0.012) were associated
      with more rapid progression to diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: In single-autoAb(+)
      relatives, the time to multiple-autoAb positivity increases with age and the
      absence of IAA and HLA-DQ2/DQ8 genotype. The majority of multiple-autoAb(+)
      individuals progress to diabetes within 20 years; this occurs more rapidly in the
      presence of IA-2A or ZnT8A, regardless of age, HLA-DQ genotype, and number of
      autoAbs. These data may help to refine the risk stratification of presymptomatic 
      type 1 diabetes.
CI  - (c) 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Gorus, Frans K
AU  - Gorus FK
AD  - Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Clinical Chemistry, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels,
      Belgium.
FAU - Balti, Eric V
AU  - Balti EV
AD  - Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Clinical Chemistry, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels,
      Belgium.
FAU - Messaaoui, Anissa
AU  - Messaaoui A
AD  - Department of Diabetology, Hopital Universitaire des Enfants Reine Fabiola,
      Brussels, Belgium.
FAU - Demeester, Simke
AU  - Demeester S
AD  - Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Clinical Chemistry, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels,
      Belgium.
FAU - Van Dalem, Annelien
AU  - Van Dalem A
AD  - Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Clinical Chemistry, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels,
      Belgium.
FAU - Costa, Olivier
AU  - Costa O
AD  - Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Clinical Chemistry, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels,
      Belgium.
FAU - Dorchy, Harry
AU  - Dorchy H
AD  - Department of Diabetology, Hopital Universitaire des Enfants Reine Fabiola,
      Brussels, Belgium.
FAU - Mathieu, Chantal
AU  - Mathieu C
AD  - Department of Endocrinology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
FAU - Van Gaal, Luc
AU  - Van Gaal L
AD  - Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Universitair Ziekenhuis 
      Antwerpen, Antwerp, Belgium.
FAU - Keymeulen, Bart
AU  - Keymeulen B
AD  - Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
AD  - Department of Diabetology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
FAU - Pipeleers, Daniel G
AU  - Pipeleers DG
AD  - Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
FAU - Weets, Ilse
AU  - Weets I
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-9007-5203
AD  - Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium
      ilse.weets@uzbrussel.be.
AD  - Department of Clinical Chemistry, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels,
      Belgium.
CN  - Belgian Diabetes Registry
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
RN  - 0 (Autoantibodies)
RN  - 0 (HLA-DQ Antigens)
RN  - 0 (HLA-DQ2 antigen)
RN  - 0 (HLA-DQ8 antigen)
RN  - 0 (Insulin)
RN  - 0 (SLC30A8 protein, human)
RN  - 0 (Zinc Transporter 8)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Autoantibodies/*blood
MH  - Belgium
MH  - Child
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/*blood/genetics
MH  - *Disease Progression
MH  - Female
MH  - Follow-Up Studies
MH  - HLA-DQ Antigens/*genetics
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant
MH  - Insulin/blood
MH  - Male
MH  - Proportional Hazards Models
MH  - *Registries
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH  - Young Adult
MH  - Zinc Transporter 8/blood
EDAT- 2017/07/14 06:00
MHDA- 2018/01/31 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/14 06:00
PHST- 2016/10/17 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/04/22 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/01/31 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/14 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc16-2228 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc16-2228 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2017 Aug;40(8):1065-1072. doi: 10.2337/dc16-2228.

PMID- 28694305
OWN - NLM
STAT- PubMed-not-MEDLINE
LR  - 20180426
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 40
IP  - 9
DP  - 2017 Sep
TI  - Insulin-Associated Weight Gain in Type 2 Diabetes Is Associated With Increases in
      Sedentary Behavior.
PG  - e120-e121
LID - 10.2337/dc17-0787 [doi]
FAU - Hartman, Yvonne A W
AU  - Hartman YAW
AD  - Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Department of Physiology, Radboud
      University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
FAU - Jansen, Henry J
AU  - Jansen HJ
AD  - Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Department of Internal Medicine,
      Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, Jeroen Bosch Hospital, 's-Hertogenbosch, the
      Netherlands.
FAU - Hopman, Maria T E
AU  - Hopman MTE
AD  - Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Department of Physiology, Radboud
      University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
AD  - Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
FAU - Tack, Cees J
AU  - Tack CJ
AD  - Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Department of Internal Medicine,
      Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
FAU - Thijssen, Dick H J
AU  - Thijssen DHJ
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-7707-5567
AD  - Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Department of Physiology, Radboud
      University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands dick.thijssen@radboudumc.nl.
AD  - Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores
      University, Liverpool, U.K.
LA  - eng
PT  - Letter
DEP - 20170710
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2017/07/12 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/12 06:01
CRDT- 2017/07/12 06:00
PHST- 2017/04/19 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/06/05 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/07/12 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/07/12 06:01 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/12 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc17-0787 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc17-0787 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2017 Sep;40(9):e120-e121. doi: 10.2337/dc17-0787. Epub 2017 Jul
      10.

PMID- 28687542
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180301
LR  - 20180426
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 40
IP  - 9
DP  - 2017 Sep
TI  - Skeletal Muscle Microvascular-Linked Improvements in Glycemic Control From
      Resistance Training in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes.
PG  - 1256-1263
LID - 10.2337/dc16-2750 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Insulin increases glucose disposal in part by enhancing microvascular 
      blood flow (MBF) and substrate delivery to myocytes. Insulin's microvascular
      action is impaired with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Resistance
      training (RT) improves glycemic control and insulin sensitivity, but whether this
      improvement is linked to augmented skeletal muscle microvascular responses in
      type 2 diabetes is unknown. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Seventeen (11 male and 6
      female; 52 +/- 2 years old) sedentary patients with type 2 diabetes underwent 6
      weeks of whole-body RT. Before and after RT, participants who fasted overnight
      had clinical chemistries measured (lipids, glucose, HbA1c, insulin, and advanced 
      glycation end products) and underwent an oral glucose challenge (OGC) (50 g x 2
      h). Forearm muscle MBF was assessed by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, skin MBF by 
      laser Doppler flowmetry, and brachial artery flow by Doppler ultrasound at
      baseline and 60 min post-OGC. A whole-body DEXA scan before and after RT assessed
      body composition. RESULTS: After RT, muscle MBF response to the OGC increased,
      while skin microvascular responses were unchanged. These microvascular
      adaptations were accompanied by improved glycemic control (fasting blood glucose,
      HbA1c, and glucose area under the curve [AUC] during OGC) and increased lean body
      mass and reductions in fasting plasma triglyceride, total cholesterol, advanced
      glycation end products, and total body fat. Changes in muscle MBF response after 
      RT significantly correlated with reductions in fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, and 
      OGC AUC with adjustment for age, sex, % body fat, and % lean mass. CONCLUSIONS:
      RT improves OGC-stimulated muscle MBF and glycemic control concomitantly,
      suggesting that MBF plays a role in improved glycemic control from RT.
CI  - (c) 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Russell, Ryan D
AU  - Russell RD
AD  - Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart,
      Australia.
AD  - Department of Health and Human Performance, College of Health Services,
      University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville, TX.
FAU - Hu, Donghua
AU  - Hu D
AD  - Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart,
      Australia.
FAU - Greenaway, Timothy
AU  - Greenaway T
AD  - Royal Hobart Hospital, Hobart, Australia.
AD  - School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia.
FAU - Blackwood, Sarah J
AU  - Blackwood SJ
AD  - Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart,
      Australia.
FAU - Dwyer, Renee M
AU  - Dwyer RM
AD  - School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia.
FAU - Sharman, James E
AU  - Sharman JE
AD  - Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart,
      Australia.
FAU - Jones, Graeme
AU  - Jones G
AD  - Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart,
      Australia.
FAU - Squibb, Kathryn A
AU  - Squibb KA
AD  - Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart,
      Australia.
FAU - Brown, Aascha A
AU  - Brown AA
AD  - Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart,
      Australia.
FAU - Otahal, Petr
AU  - Otahal P
AD  - Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart,
      Australia.
FAU - Boman, Meg
AU  - Boman M
AD  - Royal Hobart Hospital, Hobart, Australia.
FAU - Al-Aubaidy, Hayder
AU  - Al-Aubaidy H
AD  - School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia.
FAU - Premilovac, Dino
AU  - Premilovac D
AD  - School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia.
FAU - Roberts, Christian K
AU  - Roberts CK
AD  - Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center (GRECC), VA Greater Los Angeles
      Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA.
FAU - Hitchins, Samuel
AU  - Hitchins S
AD  - School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia.
FAU - Richards, Stephen M
AU  - Richards SM
AD  - School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia.
FAU - Rattigan, Stephen
AU  - Rattigan S
AD  - Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart,
      Australia.
FAU - Keske, Michelle A
AU  - Keske MA
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-4214-7628
AD  - Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
      michelle.keske@deakin.edu.au.
AD  - Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), School of Exercise and
      Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, Australia.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
DEP - 20170707
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
RN  - 0 (Blood Glucose)
RN  - 0 (Glycated Hemoglobin A)
RN  - 0 (Glycation End Products, Advanced)
RN  - 0 (Insulin)
RN  - 0 (Triglycerides)
RN  - 97C5T2UQ7J (Cholesterol)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adiposity
MH  - Anthropometry
MH  - Blood Glucose/analysis
MH  - Body Composition
MH  - Brachial Artery/metabolism
MH  - Cholesterol/blood
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*blood/*therapy
MH  - Diet
MH  - Female
MH  - Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis
MH  - Glycation End Products, Advanced/blood
MH  - Humans
MH  - Insulin/blood
MH  - Insulin Resistance
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Muscle, Skeletal/*blood supply/*physiology
MH  - Nutrition Assessment
MH  - *Resistance Training
MH  - Sedentary Lifestyle
MH  - Triglycerides/blood
EDAT- 2017/07/09 06:00
MHDA- 2018/03/02 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/09 06:00
PHST- 2016/12/23 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/06/16 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/07/09 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/03/02 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2017/07/09 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc16-2750 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc16-2750 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2017 Sep;40(9):1256-1263. doi: 10.2337/dc16-2750. Epub 2017 Jul 7.

PMID- 28700836
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170717
LR  - 20170724
IS  - 1533-4406 (Electronic)
IS  - 0028-4793 (Linking)
VI  - 377
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 Jul 13
TI  - Frequency of Evidence-Based Screening for Diabetic Retinopathy.
PG  - 195
LID - 10.1056/NEJMc1706322 [doi]
FAU - Nathan, David M
AU  - Nathan DM
AD  - Massachusetts General Hospital Diabetes Center, Boston, MA.
FAU - Bebu, Ionut
AU  - Bebu I
AD  - Biostatistics Center, George Washington University, Rockville, MD
      jml@bsc.gwu.edu.
FAU - Lachin, John M
AU  - Lachin JM
AD  - Biostatistics Center, George Washington University, Rockville, MD
      jml@bsc.gwu.edu.
LA  - eng
PT  - Letter
PT  - Comment
PL  - United States
TA  - N Engl J Med
JT  - The New England journal of medicine
JID - 0255562
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
CON - N Engl J Med. 2017 Jul 13;377(2):194-195. PMID: 28700835
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/*complications
MH  - *Diabetic Retinopathy
MH  - Humans
MH  - Mass Screening
EDAT- 2017/07/13 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/13 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/13 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/07/13 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/07/18 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1056/NEJMc1706322#SA2 [pii]
AID - 10.1056/NEJMc1706322 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - N Engl J Med. 2017 Jul 13;377(2):195. doi: 10.1056/NEJMc1706322.

PMID- 28700835
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170717
LR  - 20170817
IS  - 1533-4406 (Electronic)
IS  - 0028-4793 (Linking)
VI  - 377
IP  - 2
DP  - 2017 Jul 13
TI  - Frequency of Evidence-Based Screening for Diabetic Retinopathy.
PG  - 194-195
LID - 10.1056/NEJMc1706322 [doi]
FAU - Lamoureux, Ecosse L
AU  - Lamoureux EL
AD  - Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore, Singapore
FAU - Taylor, Hugh
AU  - Taylor H
AD  - International Council of Ophthalmology, San Francisco, CA
FAU - Wong, Tien Y
AU  - Wong TY
AD  - Singapore National Eye Center, Singapore, Singapore ophwty@nus.edu.sg
LA  - eng
PT  - Letter
PT  - Comment
PL  - United States
TA  - N Engl J Med
JT  - The New England journal of medicine
JID - 0255562
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
CON - N Engl J Med. 2017 Apr 20;376(16):1507-1516. PMID: 28423305
CIN - N Engl J Med. 2017 Jul 13;377(2):195. PMID: 28700836
MH  - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/*complications
MH  - *Diabetic Retinopathy
MH  - Humans
MH  - Mass Screening
EDAT- 2017/07/13 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/18 06:00
CRDT- 2017/07/13 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/13 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/07/13 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/07/18 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1056/NEJMc1706322 [doi]
AID - 10.1056/NEJMc1706322#SA1 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - N Engl J Med. 2017 Jul 13;377(2):194-195. doi: 10.1056/NEJMc1706322.