PMID- 30467192
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190115
IS  - 1756-1833 (Electronic)
IS  - 0959-8138 (Linking)
VI  - 363
DP  - 2018 Nov 21
TI  - Type 2 diabetes affects 7000 young people in England and Wales, analysis shows.
PG  - k4929
LID - 10.1136/bmj.k4929 [doi]
FAU - Iacobucci, Gareth
AU  - Iacobucci G
AD  - The BMJ.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181121
PL  - England
TA  - BMJ
JT  - BMJ (Clinical research ed.)
JID - 8900488
EDAT- 2018/11/24 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/24 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/24 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/24 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/24 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1136/bmj.k4929 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - BMJ. 2018 Nov 21;363:k4929. doi: 10.1136/bmj.k4929.

PMID- 30467177
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190115
IS  - 1756-1833 (Electronic)
IS  - 0959-8138 (Linking)
VI  - 363
DP  - 2018 Nov 21
TI  - Type 2 diabetes: sweetened drinks pose greater risk than other sugary foods.
PG  - k4943
LID - 10.1136/bmj.k4943 [doi]
FAU - Kmietowicz, Zosia
AU  - Kmietowicz Z
AD  - The BMJ.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181121
PL  - England
TA  - BMJ
JT  - BMJ (Clinical research ed.)
JID - 8900488
EDAT- 2018/11/24 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/24 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/24 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/24 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/24 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1136/bmj.k4943 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - BMJ. 2018 Nov 21;363:k4943. doi: 10.1136/bmj.k4943.

PMID- 30499197
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181214
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Nov 30
TI  - The association between vascular complications during pregnancy in women with
      Type 1 diabetes and congenital malformations.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13872 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To assess the association between vascular complications of diabetes and
      the risk of congenital malformations in pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes.
      METHODS: We conducted an observational retrospective cohort study in women with
      Type 1 diabetes who received care consecutively from three tertiary care
      diabetes-in-pregnancy clinics in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Multivariable logistic
      regression was used to assess the association between vascular complications
      (retinopathy, nephropathy and pre-existing hypertension) and congenital
      malformations in offspring of women with Type 1 diabetes. RESULTS: Of 232 women
      with Type 1 diabetes, 49 (21%) had at least one vascular complication and there
      were 52 babies with congenital malformations. Maternal age (31.8 +/- 5.0 vs. 29.4
      +/- 4.7 years, P < 0.01), diabetes duration (20.9 +/- 6.7 vs. 11.2 +/- 7.4 years,
      P < 0.01) and pre-eclampsia rate (12.5% vs. 1.3%, P < 0.01) were higher in
      mothers with vascular complications than in those without. Multivariable analyses
      showed that vascular complications were not associated with an increased risk of 
      congenital malformations (odds ratio 1.16, 95% confidence interval 0.46 to 2.88).
      CONCLUSIONS: Vascular complications are common, occurring in one-fifth of
      pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes, and in this study do not appear to be
      associated with an increased risk of congenital malformations in children.
CI  - (c) 2018 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Samii, L
AU  - Samii L
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary Alberta, Canada.
FAU - Kallas-Koeman, M
AU  - Kallas-Koeman M
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary Alberta, Canada.
FAU - Donovan, L E
AU  - Donovan LE
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary Alberta, Canada.
AD  - Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Calgary, Calgary Alberta, 
      Canada.
FAU - Lodha, A
AU  - Lodha A
AD  - Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary Alberta, 
      Canada.
AD  - Department of Pediatrics, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary,
      Calgary Alberta, Canada.
FAU - Crawford, S
AU  - Crawford S
AD  - Alberta Perinatal Health Program, Alberta Health Services, Calgary Alberta,
      Canada.
FAU - Butalia, S
AU  - Butalia S
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7865-9161
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary Alberta, Canada.
AD  - Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary Alberta, 
      Canada.
AD  - Libin Cardiovascular Institute, Calgary Alberta, Canada.
AD  - O'Brien Institute for Public Health, Cumming School of Medicine, University of
      Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
LA  - eng
GR  - The Stewart Diabetes Fund
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181130
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2018/12/01 06:00
MHDA- 2018/12/01 06:00
CRDT- 2018/12/01 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/28 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/12/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/12/01 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/12/01 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13872 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2018 Nov 30. doi: 10.1111/dme.13872.

PMID- 30485516
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190109
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Nov 28
TI  - Two for one? Effects of a couples intervention on partners of persons with Type 2
      diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13871 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To compare the outcomes of partners who participated in a telephone couples
      behavioural intervention to improve glycaemic control in persons with Type 2
      diabetes with those of untreated partners of participants in an individual
      intervention or education; to explore 'ripple effects', i.e. positive behaviour
      changes seen in untreated partners. METHODS: The Diabetes Support Project was a
      three-arm randomized telephone intervention trial comparing outcomes of couples
      calls (CC), individual calls (IC) and diabetes education calls (DE). Couples
      included one partner with Type 2 diabetes and HbA1c >/= 58 mmol/mol (7.5%). All
      arms received self-management education (two calls). CC and IC arms participated 
      in 10 additional behaviour change calls. CC included partners, emphasizing
      partner communication, collaboration and support. Blinded assessments were
      performed at 4, 8 and 12 months. Partner outcomes were psychosocial (diabetes
      distress, relationship satisfaction, depressive symptoms), medical (BMI, blood
      pressure) and behavioural (fat intake, activity). RESULTS: Partners' (N = 268)
      mean age was 55.8 years, 64.6% were female and 29.9% were from minority ethnic
      groups. CC (vs. IC and DE) partners had greater reductions in diabetes distress, 
      greater increases in marital satisfaction (4 and 8 months), and some improvements
      in diastolic BP. There were no consistent differences among arms in other
      outcomes. There was no evidence of a dietary or activity behaviour ripple effect 
      on untreated partners, i.e. comparing partners in the IC and DE arms.
      CONCLUSIONS: A collaborative couples intervention resulted in significant
      improvements in partner diabetes distress and relationship satisfaction. There
      were no consistent effects on behavioural or medical partner outcomes, and no
      evidence of diet or activity behaviour ripple effects, suggesting that partners
      should be targeted directly to achieve these changes. (Clinical Trial Registry
      No: NCT01017523).
CI  - (c) 2018 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Trief, P M
AU  - Trief PM
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2827-5722
AD  - Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, SUNY Upstate Medical University, 
      Syracuse, NY, USA.
AD  - Department of Medicine, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA.
FAU - Fisher, L
AU  - Fisher L
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9481-9727
AD  - Department of Family Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Sandberg, J
AU  - Sandberg J
AD  - School of Family Life, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA.
FAU - Hessler, D M
AU  - Hessler DM
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4568-6953
AD  - Department of Family Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
FAU - Cibula, D A
AU  - Cibula DA
AD  - Department of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, SUNY Upstate Medical
      University, Syracuse, NY, USA.
FAU - Weinstock, R S
AU  - Weinstock RS
AD  - Department of Medicine, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA.
LA  - eng
SI  - ClinicalTrials.gov/NCT01017523
GR  - 1R18DK080867-01A2/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney
      Diseases
GR  - R18 DK080867/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181128
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2018/11/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/30 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/29 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/26 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/11/29 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13871 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2018 Nov 28. doi: 10.1111/dme.13871.

PMID- 30474191
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181126
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Nov 26
TI  - Utility of HbA1c assessment in people with diabetes awaiting liver
      transplantation.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13870 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To investigate the relationship between HbA1c and glucose in people with
      co-existing liver disease and diabetes awaiting transplant, and in those with
      diabetes but no liver disease. METHODS: HbA1c and random plasma glucose data were
      collected for 125 people with diabetes without liver disease and for 29 people
      awaiting liver transplant with diabetes and cirrhosis. The median (interquartile 
      range) Model for End Stage Liver Disease score for the study cohort was
      calculated as 12 (9-17; normal <6). In those with cirrhosis, this was caused by
      non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, hepatitis C, alcoholic liver disease,
      hereditary haemochromatosis, polycystic liver/kidneys, cryptogenic/non-cirrhotic 
      portal hypertension and alpha-1-antitrypsin-related disease. RESULTS: The median 
      (interquartile range) age of the diabetes with cirrhosis group was 55 (49-63)
      years compared to 60 (50-71) years (P=0.13) in the group without cirrhosis. In
      the diabetes with cirrhosis group there were 21 men (72%) compared with 86 men
      (69%) in the group with diabetes and no cirrhosis (P=0.82). Of the group with
      diabetes and cirrhosis, 27 people (93%) were of white European ethnicity, two
      (7%) were South Asian and none was of Afro-Caribbean/other ethnicity compared
      with 94 (75%), 16 (13%), 10 (8%)/5 (4%), respectively, in the group with diabetes
      and no cirrhosis (P=0.20). The median (interquartile range) HbA1c concentrations 
      were 41 (32-56) mmol/mol [5.9 (5.1-7.3)]% vs 61 (52-70) mmol/mol [7.7 (6.9-8.6)%;
      P<0.001], respectively, in the diabetes with cirrhosis group vs the diabetes
      without cirrhosis group and the glucose concentrations were 8.4 (7.0-11.2) mmol/l
      vs 7.3 (5.2-11.5) mmol/l (P=0.17). HbA1c concentration was depressed by 20
      mmol/mol (1.8%; P<0.001) in 28 participants with cirrhosis but elevated by 28
      mmol/mol (2.6%) in the participant with alpha-1-antitrypsin disorder. Those with 
      cirrhosis and depressed HbA1c concentrations had fewer larger erythrocytes, and
      higher red cell distribution width and reticulocyte count. This was reflected in 
      the positive association of glucose with mean cell volume (r=0.39) and
      haemoglobin level (r=0.49) and the negative association for HbA1c concentration
      (r=-0.28 and r=-0.26, respectively) in the diabetes group. CONCLUSION: HbA1c is
      not an appropriate test for blood glucose in people with cirrhosis and diabetes
      awaiting transplant as it reflects altered erythrocyte presentation. This article
      is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
CI  - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
FAU - Bhattacharjee, D
AU  - Bhattacharjee D
AD  - Medical School, University of Birmingham, Birmingham.
FAU - Vracar, S
AU  - Vracar S
AD  - Medical School, University of Birmingham, Birmingham.
FAU - Round, R A
AU  - Round RA
AD  - Clinical Laboratory Services, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation
      Trust, Birmingham.
AD  - Diabetes Translational Research Group, Diabetes Centre, Queen Elizabeth Hospital,
      University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham.
AD  - Institute of Translational Medicine, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS
      Foundation Trust, Birmingham.
FAU - Nightingale, P G
AU  - Nightingale PG
AD  - Institute of Translational Medicine, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS
      Foundation Trust, Birmingham.
FAU - Williams, J A
AU  - Williams JA
AD  - Institute of Translational Medicine, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS
      Foundation Trust, Birmingham.
AD  - Institute of Cancer and Genomic Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham.
AD  - Mammalian Genetics Unit, Medical Research Council Harwell Institute, Harwell.
FAU - Gkoutos, G V
AU  - Gkoutos GV
AD  - Institute of Translational Medicine, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS
      Foundation Trust, Birmingham.
AD  - Institute of Cancer and Genomic Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham.
FAU - Stratton, I M
AU  - Stratton IM
AD  - Diabetes Translational Research Group, Diabetes Centre, Queen Elizabeth Hospital,
      University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham.
AD  - Gloucester Retinopathy Research Group, Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation
      Trust, Cheltenham.
FAU - Parker, R
AU  - Parker R
AD  - Leeds Liver Unit,, St James's University Hospital, Leeds.
FAU - Luzio, S D
AU  - Luzio SD
AD  - Diabetes Translational Research Group, Diabetes Centre, Queen Elizabeth Hospital,
      University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham.
AD  - Diabetes Research Group, Swansea University, Swansea, UK.
FAU - Roberts, G A
AU  - Roberts GA
AD  - Diabetes Translational Research Group, Diabetes Centre, Queen Elizabeth Hospital,
      University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham.
AD  - Diabetes Research Group, Swansea University, Swansea, UK.
AD  - HRB-Clinical Research Facility, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
FAU - Webber, J
AU  - Webber J
AD  - Diabetes Translational Research Group, Diabetes Centre, Queen Elizabeth Hospital,
      University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham.
AD  - Institute of Translational Medicine, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS
      Foundation Trust, Birmingham.
FAU - Ghosh, S
AU  - Ghosh S
AD  - Diabetes Translational Research Group, Diabetes Centre, Queen Elizabeth Hospital,
      University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham.
AD  - Institute of Translational Medicine, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS
      Foundation Trust, Birmingham.
FAU - Manley, S E
AU  - Manley SE
AD  - Medical School, University of Birmingham, Birmingham.
AD  - Diabetes Translational Research Group, Diabetes Centre, Queen Elizabeth Hospital,
      University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham.
AD  - Institute of Translational Medicine, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS
      Foundation Trust, Birmingham.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181126
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2018/11/27 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/27 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/27 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13870 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2018 Nov 26. doi: 10.1111/dme.13870.

PMID- 30474144
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181207
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Nov 25
TI  - The unmet need for better risk stratification of non-proliferative diabetic
      retinopathy.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13868 [doi]
AB  - Diabetic retinopathy is a common microvascular complication of diabetes and
      remains one of the leading causes of preventable blindness in working-age people.
      Non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy is the earliest stage of diabetic
      retinopathy and is typically asymptomatic. Currently, the severity of diabetic
      retinopathy is assessed using semi-quantitative grading systems based on the
      presence or absence of retinal lesions. These methods are well validated, but do 
      not predict those at high risk of rapid progression to sight-threatening diabetic
      retinopathy; therefore, new approaches for identifying these people are a current
      unmet need. We evaluated published data reporting the lesion characteristics
      associated with different progression profiles in people with non-proliferative
      diabetic retinopathy. Based on these findings, we propose that additional
      assessments of features of non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy lesions may
      help to stratify people based on the likelihood of rapid progression. In addition
      to the current classification, the following measurements should be considered:
      the shape and size of lesions; whether lesions are angiogenic in origin; the
      location of lesions, including predominantly peripheral lesions; and lesion
      turnover and dynamics. For lesions commonly seen in hypertensive retinopathy, a
      detailed assessment of potential concomitant diseases is also recommended. We
      believe that natural history studies of these changes will help characterize
      these non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy progression profiles and advance our
      understanding of the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy in order to
      individualize management of people with diabetic retinopathy.
CI  - (c) 2018 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Sivaprasad, S
AU  - Sivaprasad S
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8952-0659
AD  - Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK.
AD  - University College London, London, UK.
FAU - Pearce, E
AU  - Pearce E
AD  - Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK.
AD  - University College London, London, UK.
LA  - eng
GR  - Boehringer Ingelheim
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
DEP - 20181125
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2018/11/27 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/27 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/27 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/22 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13868 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2018 Nov 25. doi: 10.1111/dme.13868.

PMID- 30487263
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181129
IS  - 1939-327X (Electronic)
IS  - 0012-1797 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Nov 28
TI  - Multiethnic Genome-wide Association Study of Diabetic Retinopathy using Liability
      Threshold Modeling of Duration of Diabetes and Glycemic Control.
LID - db180567 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/db18-0567 [doi]
AB  - To identify genetic variants associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR), we
      performed a large, multiethnic genome-wide association study (GWAS). Discovery
      included eight European cohorts (n = 3,246) and seven African American cohorts (n
      = 2,611). We meta-analyzed across cohorts using inverse-variance weighting, with 
      and without liability threshold modeling of glycemic control and duration of
      diabetes. Variants with a P value < 1 X 10(-5) were investigated in replication
      cohorts that included 18,545 Europeans, 16,453 Asians and 2,710 Hispanics. After 
      correction for multiple testing, the C allele of rs142293996 in an intron of
      nuclear VCP-like (NVL) was associated with DR in European discovery cohorts (P = 
      2.1 x 10(-9)), but did not reach genome-wide significance after meta-analysis
      with replication cohorts. We applied the Disease Association Protein-Protein Link
      Evaluator (DAPPLE) to our discovery results to test for evidence of risk being
      spread across underlying molecular pathways. One protein-protein interaction
      network built from genes in regions associated with proliferative DR (PDR) was
      found to have significant connectivity (P=0.0009) and corroborated with gene set 
      enrichment analyses. These findings suggest that genetic variation in NVL, as
      well as variation within a protein-protein interaction network that includes
      genes implicated in inflammation, may influence risk for DR.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Pollack, Samuela
AU  - Pollack S
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston,
      MA.
FAU - Igo, Robert P Jr
AU  - Igo RP Jr
AD  - Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Case Western
      University, Cleveland, OH.
FAU - Jensen, Richard A
AU  - Jensen RA
AD  - Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Epidemiology and
      Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
FAU - Christiansen, Mark
AU  - Christiansen M
AD  - Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Epidemiology and
      Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
FAU - Li, Xiaohui
AU  - Li X
AD  - Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, LABioMed and
      Department of Pediatrics at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA.
FAU - Cheng, Ching-Yu
AU  - Cheng CY
AD  - Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore.
AD  - Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore.
FAU - Ng, Maggie C Y
AU  - Ng MCY
AD  - Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine Research, Wake Forest School of
      Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.
AD  - Department of Biochemistry, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.
FAU - Smith, Albert V
AU  - Smith AV
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
FAU - Rossin, Elizabeth J
AU  - Rossin EJ
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear
      Infirmary, Boston, MA.
FAU - Segre, Ayellet V
AU  - Segre AV
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear
      Infirmary, Boston, MA.
FAU - Davoudi, Samaneh
AU  - Davoudi S
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear
      Infirmary, Boston, MA.
FAU - Tan, Gavin S
AU  - Tan GS
AD  - Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore.
AD  - Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore.
FAU - Ida Chen, Yii-Der
AU  - Ida Chen YD
AD  - Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, LABioMed and
      Department of Pediatrics at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA.
FAU - Kuo, Jane Z
AU  - Kuo JZ
AD  - Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, LABioMed and
      Department of Pediatrics at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA.
AD  - Medical Affairs, Ophthalmology, Sun Pharmaceutical Industries, Inc, Princeton,
      NJ.
FAU - Dimitrov, Latchezar M
AU  - Dimitrov LM
AD  - Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine Research, Wake Forest School of
      Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.
AD  - Department of Biochemistry, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.
FAU - Stanwyck, Lynn K
AU  - Stanwyck LK
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear
      Infirmary, Boston, MA.
FAU - Meng, Weihua
AU  - Meng W
AD  - Division of Population Health Sciences, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School,
      University of Dundee School of Medicine, Scotland, UK.
FAU - Hosseini, S Mohsen
AU  - Hosseini SM
AD  - Program in Genetics and Genome Biology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, 
      Ontario, Canada Currently at: Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine,
      Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.
FAU - Imamura, Minako
AU  - Imamura M
AD  - Laboratory for Endocrinology, Metabolism and Kidney Diseases, RIKEN Center for
      Integrative Medical Sciences, Yokohama 230-0045, Japan.
AD  - Department of Advanced Genomic and Laboratory Medicine, Graduate School of
      Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Japan.
AD  - Division of Clinical Laboratory and Blood Transfusion, University of the Ryukyus 
      Hospital, Nishihara, Japan.
FAU - Nousome, Darryl
AU  - Nousome D
AD  - Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of
      Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.
FAU - Kim, Jihye
AU  - Kim J
AD  - Human Genetics Center, School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health
      Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX.
FAU - Hai, Yang
AU  - Hai Y
AD  - Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, LABioMed and
      Department of Pediatrics at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA.
FAU - Jia, Yucheng
AU  - Jia Y
AD  - Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, LABioMed and
      Department of Pediatrics at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA.
FAU - Ahn, Jeeyun
AU  - Ahn J
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University College of Medicine,
      SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
FAU - Leong, Aaron
AU  - Leong A
AD  - Endocrine Unit, Diabetes Unit, Division of General Internal Medicine,
      Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.
FAU - Shah, Kaanan
AU  - Shah K
AD  - Section of Genetic Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
FAU - Park, Kyu Hyung
AU  - Park KH
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul
      National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.
FAU - Guo, Xiuqing
AU  - Guo X
AD  - Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, LABioMed and
      Department of Pediatrics at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA.
FAU - Ipp, Eli
AU  - Ipp E
AD  - Section of Diabetes and Metabolism, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, University of
      California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA.
FAU - Taylor, Kent D
AU  - Taylor KD
AD  - Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, LABioMed and
      Department of Pediatrics at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA.
FAU - Adler, Sharon G
AU  - Adler SG
AD  - Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Los Angeles Biomedical Research
      Institute at Harbor-University of California, Torrance, CA.
FAU - Sedor, John R
AU  - Sedor JR
AD  - Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.
AD  - Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University,
      Cleveland, OH.
AD  - Division of Nephrology, MetroHealth System, Cleveland, OH.
FAU - Freedman, Barry I
AU  - Freedman BI
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine, Section on Nephrology, Wake Forest School of
      Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.
CN  - Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes-Eye Research Group, DCCT/EDIC
      Research Group
FAU - Lee, I-Te
AU  - Lee IT
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine,
      Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
AD  - School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
AD  - School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
FAU - H-H Sheu, Wayne
AU  - H-H Sheu W
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine,
      Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
AD  - School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
AD  - School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
AD  - School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan.
FAU - Kubo, Michiaki
AU  - Kubo M
AD  - RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Yokohama, 230-0045 Japan.
FAU - Takahashi, Atsushi
AU  - Takahashi A
AD  - Laboratory for Statistical Analysis, RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical
      Sciences, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan.
AD  - National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Research Institute, Department of
      Genomic Medicine, Osaka 565-8565, Japan.
FAU - Hadjadj, Samy
AU  - Hadjadj S
AD  - CHU de Poitiers, Centre d'Investigation Clinique, Poitiers, France.
AD  - Universite de Poitiers, UFR Medecine Pharmacie, CIC1402, Poitiers, France.
AD  - INSERM, CIC1402, Poitiers, France.
AD  - L'Institut du Thorax, INSERM, CNRS, CHU Nantes, Nantes, France.
FAU - Marre, Michel
AU  - Marre M
AD  - Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, France.
AD  - Diabetology, Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, DHU FIRE, Bichat Hospital,
      AP-HP, Paris, France.
AD  - INSERM U1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France.
FAU - Tregouet, David-Alexandre
AU  - Tregouet DA
AD  - Sorbonne Universite, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, INSERM, UMR_S 1166, Team Genomics &
      Pathophysiology of Cardiovascular Diseases, Paris, France.
AD  - ICAN Institute for Cardiometabolism and Nutrition, Paris, France.
FAU - Mckean-Cowdin, Roberta
AU  - Mckean-Cowdin R
AD  - Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of
      Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.
AD  - USC Roski Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Keck School of Medicine of 
      the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.
FAU - Varma, Rohit
AU  - Varma R
AD  - Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of
      Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.
AD  - USC Roski Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Keck School of Medicine of 
      the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.
FAU - McCarthy, Mark I
AU  - McCarthy MI
AD  - Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Oxford,
      Churchill Hospital, Old Road, Headington, Oxford, OX3 7LJ UK.
AD  - Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford
      OX3 7BN, UK.
AD  - Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Churchill Hospital, Old Road, Headington,
      Oxford, OX3 7LJ UK.
FAU - Groop, Leif
AU  - Groop L
AD  - Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmo,
      Sweden.
FAU - Ahlqvist, Emma
AU  - Ahlqvist E
AD  - Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmo,
      Sweden.
FAU - Lyssenko, Valeriya
AU  - Lyssenko V
AD  - Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmo,
      Sweden.
AD  - Department of Clinical Science, KG Jebsen Center for Diabetes Research,
      University of Bergen, Norway.
FAU - Agardh, Elisabet
AU  - Agardh E
AD  - Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmo,
      Sweden.
FAU - Morris, Andrew
AU  - Morris A
AD  - The Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of 
      Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK, EH8 9AG.
FAU - Doney, Alex S F
AU  - Doney ASF
AD  - Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and
      Medical School, Dundee, DD1 9SY, UK.
FAU - Colhoun, Helen M
AU  - Colhoun HM
AD  - Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine,Western General Hospital,Crewe
      Road,University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK,EH4 2XUT.
FAU - Toppila, Iiro
AU  - Toppila I
AD  - Folkhalsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhalsan Research Center, 00290, Helsinki,
      Finland.
AD  - Abdominal Center, Nephrology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University
      Hospital, 00290, Helsinki, Finland.
AD  - Research Programs Unit, Diabetes and Obesity, University of Helsinki, 00290,
      Helsinki, Finland.
FAU - Sandholm, Niina
AU  - Sandholm N
AD  - Folkhalsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhalsan Research Center, 00290, Helsinki,
      Finland.
AD  - Abdominal Center, Nephrology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University
      Hospital, 00290, Helsinki, Finland.
AD  - Research Programs Unit, Diabetes and Obesity, University of Helsinki, 00290,
      Helsinki, Finland.
FAU - Groop, Per-Henrik
AU  - Groop PH
AD  - Folkhalsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhalsan Research Center, 00290, Helsinki,
      Finland.
AD  - Abdominal Center, Nephrology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University
      Hospital, 00290, Helsinki, Finland.
AD  - Research Programs Unit, Diabetes and Obesity, University of Helsinki, 00290,
      Helsinki, Finland.
AD  - Department of Diabetes, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne,
      Victoria, Australia.
FAU - Maeda, Shiro
AU  - Maeda S
AD  - Laboratory for Endocrinology, Metabolism and Kidney Diseases, RIKEN Center for
      Integrative Medical Sciences, Yokohama 230-0045, Japan.
AD  - Department of Advanced Genomic and Laboratory Medicine, Graduate School of
      Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Japan.
AD  - Division of Clinical Laboratory and Blood Transfusion, University of the Ryukyus 
      Hospital, Nishihara, Japan.
FAU - Hanis, Craig L
AU  - Hanis CL
AD  - Human Genetics Center, School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health
      Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX.
FAU - Penman, Alan
AU  - Penman A
AD  - Department of Preventive Medicine, John D. Bower School of Population Health,
      University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS.
FAU - Chen, Ching J
AU  - Chen CJ
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson,
      MS Currently at: Retina Center, North Mississippi Medical Center, Tupelo, MS.
FAU - Hancock, Heather
AU  - Hancock H
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson,
      MS Currently at: Retina Center, North Mississippi Medical Center, Tupelo, MS.
FAU - Mitchell, Paul
AU  - Mitchell P
AD  - Centre for Vision Research, Westmead Institute for Medical Research, University
      of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
FAU - Craig, Jamie E
AU  - Craig JE
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, Flinders University, Bedford Park SA, Australia.
FAU - Chew, Emily Y
AU  - Chew EY
AD  - Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications, National Eye Institute,
      National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.
FAU - Paterson, Andrew D
AU  - Paterson AD
AD  - Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
AD  - Program in Genetics and Genome Biology Hospital for Sick Children's, Toronto,
      Ontario, Canada.
AD  - Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of
      Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
FAU - Grassi, Michael A
AU  - Grassi MA
AD  - Grassi Retina, Naperville, IL.
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at
      Chicago, 1012 95th St., Suite 9, Chicago, IL.
FAU - Palmer, Colin
AU  - Palmer C
AD  - Pat MacPherson Centre for Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics, University of
      Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, UK.
FAU - Bowden, Donald W
AU  - Bowden DW
AD  - Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine Research, Wake Forest School of
      Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.
AD  - Department of Biochemistry, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.
FAU - Yaspan, Brian L
AU  - Yaspan BL
AD  - Genentech Inc., South San Francisco, CA.
FAU - Siscovick, David
AU  - Siscovick D
AD  - Institute for Urban Health, New York Academy of Medicine, New York City, New
      York.
FAU - Cotch, Mary Frances
AU  - Cotch MF
AD  - Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications, National Eye Institute,
      National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.
FAU - Wang, Jie Jin
AU  - Wang JJ
AD  - Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore.
AD  - Centre for Vision Research, Westmead Institute for Medical Research, University
      of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
FAU - Burdon, Kathryn P
AU  - Burdon KP
AD  - Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart,
      Australia.
FAU - Wong, Tien Y
AU  - Wong TY
AD  - Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore.
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University
      of Singapore, Singapore.
FAU - Klein, Barbara E K
AU  - Klein BEK
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison,
      Madison, WI.
FAU - Klein, Ronald
AU  - Klein R
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison,
      Madison, WI.
FAU - Rotter, Jerome I
AU  - Rotter JI
AD  - Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, LABioMed and
      Department of Pediatrics at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA.
FAU - Iyengar, Sudha K
AU  - Iyengar SK
AD  - Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Case Western
      University, Cleveland, OH.
FAU - Price, Alkes
AU  - Price A
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston,
      MA.
FAU - Sobrin, Lucia
AU  - Sobrin L
AD  - Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear
      Infirmary, Boston, MA Lucia_Sobrin@meei.harvard.edu.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181128
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes
JT  - Diabetes
JID - 0372763
EDAT- 2018/11/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/30 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/30 06:00
PHST- 2018/05/23 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/11/12 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - db18-0567 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/db18-0567 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes. 2018 Nov 28. pii: db18-0567. doi: 10.2337/db18-0567.

PMID- 30487262
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181129
IS  - 1939-327X (Electronic)
IS  - 0012-1797 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Nov 28
TI  - Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of OATP Dysfunction in
      Diabetes.
LID - db180525 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/db18-0525 [doi]
AB  - Diabetes mellitus is associated with hepatic metabolic dysfunction predisposing
      patients to drug induced liver injury. Mouse models of Type 2 diabetes (T2D) have
      dramatically reduced expression of Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide (OATP) 
      1A1, a transporter expressed in hepatocytes and in the kidneys. Effects of
      diabetes on OATP1B2 expression are less studied and less consistent. OATP1A1 and 
      OATP1B2 both transport endogenous substrates such as bile acids and
      hormone-conjugates as well as numerous drugs including Gd-EOB-DTPA. As master
      pharmacokinetic regulators, altered expression of OATPs in diabetes mellitus
      could have a profound and clinically significant influence on drug therapies.
      Here, we report a method to non-invasively measure OATP activity in T2D mice by
      quantifying the transport of hepatobiliary-specific gadolinium based contrast
      agents (GBCAs) within the liver and kidneys using dynamic contrast enhanced MRI
      (DCE-MRI). By comparing GBCA uptake in control and OATP knockout mice, we
      confirmed liver clearance of the hepatobiliary-specific GBCAs, Gd-EOB-DTPA and
      Gd-BOPTA, primarily though OATP transporters. Then, we measured a reduction in
      the hepatic uptake of these hepatobiliary GBCAs in T2D ob/ob mice, which mirrored
      significant reductions in the mRNA and protein expression of OATP1A1 and OATP1B2.
      As these GBCAs are FDA approved agents and DCE-MRI is a standard clinical
      protocol, studies to determine OATP1B1/1B3 deficiencies in human diabetics can be
      easily envisioned.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Shuboni-Mulligan, Dorela D
AU  - Shuboni-Mulligan DD
AD  - Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.
AD  - Institute for Quantitative Health Sciences and Engineering, Michigan State
      University, East Lansing, MI.
FAU - Parys, Maciej
AU  - Parys M
AD  - Department of Comparative Medicine and Integrative Biology Program, Michigan
      State University, East Lansing, MI.
FAU - Blanco-Fernandez, Barbara
AU  - Blanco-Fernandez B
AD  - Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.
AD  - Institute for Quantitative Health Sciences and Engineering, Michigan State
      University, East Lansing, MI.
FAU - Mallett, Christiane L
AU  - Mallett CL
AD  - Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.
AD  - Institute for Quantitative Health Sciences and Engineering, Michigan State
      University, East Lansing, MI.
FAU - Schnegelberger, Regina
AU  - Schnegelberger R
AD  - Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas
      Medical Center, Kansas City, MO.
FAU - Takada, Marilia
AU  - Takada M
AD  - Department of Comparative Medicine and Integrative Biology Program, Michigan
      State University, East Lansing, MI.
FAU - Chakravarty, Shatadru
AU  - Chakravarty S
AD  - Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.
AD  - Institute for Quantitative Health Sciences and Engineering, Michigan State
      University, East Lansing, MI.
FAU - Hagenbuch, Bruno
AU  - Hagenbuch B
AD  - Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas
      Medical Center, Kansas City, MO.
FAU - Shapiro, Erik M
AU  - Shapiro EM
AD  - Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
      erik.shapiro@rad.msu.edu.
AD  - Institute for Quantitative Health Sciences and Engineering, Michigan State
      University, East Lansing, MI.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181128
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes
JT  - Diabetes
JID - 0372763
EDAT- 2018/11/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/30 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/30 06:00
PHST- 2018/05/10 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/11/09 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - db18-0525 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/db18-0525 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes. 2018 Nov 28. pii: db18-0525. doi: 10.2337/db18-0525.

PMID- 30487231
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181129
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Nov 28
TI  - Inclisiran Lowers LDL-C and PCSK9 Irrespective of Diabetes Status: The ORION-1
      Randomized Clinical Trial.
LID - dc181491 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1491 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of inclisiran by diabetes status. 
      RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: ORION-1 (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02597127) randomized
      501 subjects with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) or ASCVD risk
      equivalents and high LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), despite maximally tolerated
      LDL-C-lowering therapies, to one or two doses of placebo or inclisiran. Levels of
      lipids and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) at baseline and 
      day 180 were compared. RESULTS: Inclisiran was associated with marked declines in
      LDL-C (median -28% to -52%, P < 0.0001 and -28% to -55%, P < 0.005 for all doses 
      in the without- and with-diabetes groups, respectively) and PCSK9. The
      inclisiran-treated groups also had lower apolipoprotein B, non-HDL cholesterol,
      and lipoprotein(a) but higher HDL cholesterol. Inclisiran had an adverse profile 
      similar to that of placebo, and adverse events were proportionally balanced in
      the baseline with- and without-diabetes groups. CONCLUSIONS: PCSK9-targeted
      siRNA-driven strategies may provide a novel therapeutic option for managing
      dyslipidemia in the presence and absence of diabetes.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Leiter, Lawrence A
AU  - Leiter LA
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1040-6229
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. 
      Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
      leiterl@smh.ca.
FAU - Teoh, Hwee
AU  - Teoh H
AD  - Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. 
      Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - Division of Cardiac Surgery, Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science and Li
      Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Kallend, David
AU  - Kallend D
AD  - The Medicines Company, Parsippany, NJ.
FAU - Wright, R Scott
AU  - Wright RS
AD  - Department of Cardiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
FAU - Landmesser, Ulf
AU  - Landmesser U
AD  - Department of Cardiology, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin Institute of
      Health and German Center for Cardiovascular Research, Partner Site Berlin,
      Berlin, Germany.
FAU - Wijngaard, Peter L J
AU  - Wijngaard PLJ
AD  - The Medicines Company, Parsippany, NJ.
FAU - Kastelein, John J P
AU  - Kastelein JJP
AD  - Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of
      Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
FAU - Ray, Kausik K
AU  - Ray KK
AD  - Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Imperial Centre for Cardiovascular 
      Disease Prevention, Imperial College London, London, U.K.
LA  - eng
SI  - ClinicalTrials.gov/NCT02597127
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181128
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2018/11/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/30 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/30 06:00
PHST- 2018/07/12 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/10/21 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-1491 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1491 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2018 Nov 28. pii: dc18-1491. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1491.

PMID- 30487230
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181129
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Nov 28
TI  - Real-World Database Examining the Association Between Avascular Necrosis of the
      Femoral Head and Diabetes in Taiwan.
LID - dc181258 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1258 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: No study has been conducted to evaluate the association between
      avascular necrosis of the femoral head and diabetes. This study's aim was to
      assess this issue in Taiwan. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A population-based
      cohort study was performed to analyze the database of Taiwan's National Health
      Insurance Program. There were 27,869 subjects aged 20-84 years with newly
      diagnosed diabetes from 2000 to 2012 as the group with diabetes. The group
      without diabetes included 111,476 sex- and age-matched subjects without diabetes.
      The incidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head at the end of 2013 was
      measured. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to
      measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% CI for avascular necrosis of the femoral
      head associated with diabetes. RESULTS: The overall incidence of avascular
      necrosis of the femoral head was 1.37-fold higher in the group with diabetes than
      in the group without diabetes (6.53 vs. 4.76 per 1,000 person-years [95% CI
      1.31-1.43]). After adjusting for confounders, the HR of avascular necrosis of the
      femoral head was 1.16 (95% CI 1.11-1.21) for the subjects with diabetes compared 
      with the subjects without diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with diabetes have a
      1.16-fold increased risk for developing avascular necrosis of the femoral head.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Lai, Shih-Wei
AU  - Lai SW
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7420-1572
AD  - College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
      kuanfuliaog@gmail.com.
AD  - Department of Family Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung,
      Taiwan.
FAU - Lin, Cheng-Li
AU  - Lin CL
AD  - College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
AD  - Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung,
      Taiwan.
FAU - Liao, Kuan-Fu
AU  - Liao KF
AD  - College of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan kuanfuliaog@gmail.com.
AD  - Division of Hepatogastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Tzu
      Chi Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181128
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2018/11/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/30 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/30 06:00
PHST- 2018/06/11 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/10/04 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-1258 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1258 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2018 Nov 28. pii: dc18-1258. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1258.

PMID- 30482755
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181128
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Nov 27
TI  - Serum Uromodulin Predicts Less Coronary Artery Calcification and Diabetic Kidney 
      Disease Over 12 years in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: The CACTI Study.
LID - dc181527 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1527 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Novel biomarkers are needed to better predict coronary artery
      calcification (CAC), a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, and diabetic kidney
      disease (DKD) in type 1 diabetes. We evaluated the associations between serum
      uromodulin (SUMOD [a biomarker associated with anti-inflammatory and renal
      protective properties]), CAC progression and DKD development over 12 years.
      RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Participants (n = 527, 53% females) in the Coronary 
      Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) study were examined during
      2002-2004, at a mean age of 39.6 +/- 9.0 years and a median duration of diabetes 
      of 24.8 years. Urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) and estimated glomerular
      filtration rate (eGFR) determined by the CKD-EPI (Chronic Kidney Disease
      Epidemiology Collaboration) creatinine equation were measured at baseline and
      after a mean follow-up period of 12.1 +/- 1.5 years. Elevated albumin excretion
      was defined as ACR >/=30 mg/g, rapid GFR decline (>3 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/year), and 
      impaired GFR as eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). SUMOD was measured on stored baseline 
      plasma samples (Meso Scale Diagnostics). CAC was measured using electron beam
      computed tomography. CAC progression was defined as a change in the square
      root-transformed CAC volume of >/=2.5. RESULTS: Higher baseline SUMOD level
      conferred lower odds of CAC progression (odds ratio 0.68; 95% CI 0.48-0.97) per 1
      SD increase in SUMOD (68.44 ng/mL), incident elevated albumin excretion (0.37;
      0.16-0.86), rapid GFR decline (0.56, 0.35-0.91), and impaired GFR (0.44;
      0.24-0.83) after adjustment for baseline age, sex, systolic blood pressure, LDL, 
      albuminuria/GFR. The addition of SUMOD to models with traditional risk factors
      also significantly improved the prediction performance for CAC progression and
      incident DKD. CONCLUSIONS: Higher baseline SUMOD level predicted lower odds of
      both CAC progression and incident DKD over 12 years in adults with type 1
      diabetes.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Bjornstad, Petter
AU  - Bjornstad P
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5160-2947
AD  - Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, University of Colorado School of Medicine,
      Aurora, CO petter.bjornstad@childrenscolorado.org.
AD  - Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO.
FAU - Wiromrat, Pattara
AU  - Wiromrat P
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1070-6774
AD  - Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, University of Colorado School of Medicine,
      Aurora, CO.
FAU - Johnson, Richard J
AU  - Johnson RJ
AD  - Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, and Department of Physiology,
      University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Sippl, Rachel
AU  - Sippl R
AD  - Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO.
FAU - Cherney, David Z
AU  - Cherney DZ
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4164-0429
AD  - Department of Nephrology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO.
FAU - Wong, Randy
AU  - Wong R
AD  - Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO.
FAU - Rewers, Marian J
AU  - Rewers MJ
AD  - Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO.
FAU - Snell-Bergeon, Janet K
AU  - Snell-Bergeon JK
AD  - Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181127
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2018/11/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/30 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/29 06:00
PHST- 2018/07/16 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/10/23 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/11/29 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-1527 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1527 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2018 Nov 27. pii: dc18-1527. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1527.

PMID- 30476180
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20181126
IS  - 1945-7197 (Electronic)
IS  - 0021-972X (Linking)
DP  - 2018 Nov 21
TI  - Early Clinical Indicators of Addison's Disease in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes: a 
      Nationwide, Observational, Cohort Study.
LID - 10.1210/jc.2018-02064 [doi]
AB  - Context: Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have an increased risk of 
      Addison's disease (AD) development but prediction of those at risk is not
      possible. Objective: To determine whether there are early clinical indicators
      that may denote the development of AD in adults with T1DM. Design: Observational,
      matched-cohort study. Setting: Patient data from Swedish national registries
      (National Diabetes Register [NDR], Inpatient Register, Prescription Drug
      Register). Participants: All T1DM patients diagnosed with concomitant AD (n=66)
      among the 36,514 adult patients with T1DM in the NDR between 1998-2013. Each case
      was matched to five controls with T1DM alone (n=330). Main outcome measures:
      Clinical data and drug prescriptions were assessed prior to baseline (inclusion
      into the study) and prior to AD diagnosis. Analysis of covariance and estimated
      group proportions were used for comparisons. Results: Prior to baseline, cases
      had a higher frequency of thyroid/antithyroid drug prescription than controls
      (9.1% vs 1.8%). Prior to AD diagnosis, cases had higher frequencies of diabetic
      retinopathy (12.1% vs 2.1%), infections requiring hospital admission (16.7% vs
      2.1%), thyroid/antithyroid drug prescription (28.8% vs 7.0%), and glucagon
      prescription (18.2% vs 6.4%). There was no difference in glycated hemoglobin
      between the groups prior to baseline or prior to AD diagnosis. Conclusions: These
      data suggest that medical treatment for thyroid disease, a severe infection, and 
      glucagon prescription for severe hypoglycemia should raise the suspicion of AD
      development in adults with T1DM. Development of diabetic retinopathy might also
      be associated with glucocorticoid deficiency and the development of AD among
      patients with T1DM.
FAU - Chantzichristos, Dimitrios
AU  - Chantzichristos D
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine at 
      Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
AD  - Department of Endocrinology-Diabetes-Metabolism, Sahlgrenska University Hospital,
      Gothenburg, Sweden.
FAU - Persson, Anders
AU  - Persson A
AD  - National Diabetes Register, Centre of Registers, Department of Medicine,
      University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
FAU - Miftaraj, Mervete
AU  - Miftaraj M
AD  - National Diabetes Register, Centre of Registers, Department of Medicine,
      University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
FAU - Eliasson, Bjorn
AU  - Eliasson B
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine at 
      Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
AD  - Department of Endocrinology-Diabetes-Metabolism, Sahlgrenska University Hospital,
      Gothenburg, Sweden.
AD  - National Diabetes Register, Centre of Registers, Department of Medicine,
      University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
FAU - Svensson, Ann-Marie
AU  - Svensson AM
AD  - National Diabetes Register, Centre of Registers, Department of Medicine,
      University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
FAU - Johannsson, Gudmundur
AU  - Johannsson G
AD  - Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine at 
      Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
AD  - Department of Endocrinology-Diabetes-Metabolism, Sahlgrenska University Hospital,
      Gothenburg, Sweden.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181121
PL  - United States
TA  - J Clin Endocrinol Metab
JT  - The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
JID - 0375362
EDAT- 2018/11/27 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/27 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/27 06:00
PHST- 2018/09/22 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/11/16 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - 5193469 [pii]
AID - 10.1210/jc.2018-02064 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2018 Nov 21. pii: 5193469. doi: 10.1210/jc.2018-02064.

PMID- 30471834
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
LR  - 20181222
IS  - 1873-2623 (Electronic)
IS  - 0041-1345 (Linking)
VI  - 50
IP  - 10
DP  - 2018 Dec
TI  - Incidence and Risk Factors of Posttransplantation Diabetes Mellitus in Living
      Donor Kidney Transplantation: A Single-Center Retrospective Study in China.
PG  - 3381-3385
LID - S0041-1345(18)31048-0 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.transproceed.2018.08.007 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Posttransplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a frequent metabolic 
      complication following solid organ transplantation and was proven to be
      associated with adverse outcome. This study aimed to identify the incidence and
      risk factors of PTDM under the background of relative-living renal
      transplantation in China. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study that
      included 358 recipients who underwent relative-living donor kidney
      transplantation in the Organ Transplant Institute of 309th Hospital of People's
      Liberation Army between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2014. PTDM was defined 
      based on American Diabetes Association criteria. Demographics and laboratory
      results were compared between patients with PTDM and non-PTDM; multivariate
      analysis was performed using a logistic regression model. RESULTS: One hundred
      ten out of a total of 358 recipients were diagnosed with PTDM (30.72%) within 3
      years after transplantations. Seven risk factors for PTDM were identified in
      multivariate analysis: body mass index >/=25 (odds ratio [OR] 1.905, 95%
      confidence interval [CI]: 1.114-3.258), family history of diabetes (OR 1.898, CI:
      1.051-3.258), hypomagnesemia pretransplantation (OR 1.871, CI: 1.133-3.092),
      acute rejection episodes in 3 months posttransplantation (OR 2.312, CI:
      1.015-5.268), tacrolimus use (OR 1.952, CI: 1.169-3.258), impaired fasting
      glucose diagnosed pretransplantation (OR 1.807, CI: 1.091-2.993), and
      hyperglycemia in the first week posttransplantation (OR 1.856, CI: 1.133-3.043). 
      CONCLUSION: Our study suggests high body mass index, family diabetes history,
      hypomagnesemia pretransplantation, acute rejection episodes within the first 3
      months after transplantation, tacrolimus use, impaired fasting glucose diagnosed 
      pretransplantation, and hyperglycemia within the first week after transplantation
      are independent risk factors of PTDM in relative-living donor transplantation.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
FAU - Xu, J
AU  - Xu J
AD  - Medical School of Chinese People's Liberation Army, the Chinese People's
      Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China; Organ Transplant Institute of
      People's Liberation Army, Beijing Key Laboratory of Immunology Regulatory and
      Organ Transplantation, the 309th Hospital of People's Liberation Army, Beijing,
      China.
FAU - Xu, L
AU  - Xu L
AD  - Medical School of Chinese People's Liberation Army, the Chinese People's
      Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China; Organ Transplant Institute of
      People's Liberation Army, Beijing Key Laboratory of Immunology Regulatory and
      Organ Transplantation, the 309th Hospital of People's Liberation Army, Beijing,
      China.
FAU - Wei, X
AU  - Wei X
AD  - Organ Transplant Institute of People's Liberation Army, Beijing Key Laboratory of
      Immunology Regulatory and Organ Transplantation, the 309th Hospital of People's
      Liberation Army, Beijing, China.
FAU - Li, X
AU  - Li X
AD  - Medical School of Chinese People's Liberation Army, the Chinese People's
      Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China; Organ Transplant Institute of
      People's Liberation Army, Beijing Key Laboratory of Immunology Regulatory and
      Organ Transplantation, the 309th Hospital of People's Liberation Army, Beijing,
      China.
FAU - Cai, M
AU  - Cai M
AD  - Medical School of Chinese People's Liberation Army, the Chinese People's
      Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China; Organ Transplant Institute of
      People's Liberation Army, Beijing Key Laboratory of Immunology Regulatory and
      Organ Transplantation, the 309th Hospital of People's Liberation Army, Beijing,
      China. Electronic address: caiming2002@hotmail.com.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20180809
PL  - United States
TA  - Transplant Proc
JT  - Transplantation proceedings
JID - 0243532
EDAT- 2018/11/26 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/26 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/26 06:00
PHST- 2018/06/05 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/08/03 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/11/26 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/26 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/11/26 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0041-1345(18)31048-0 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.transproceed.2018.08.007 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Transplant Proc. 2018 Dec;50(10):3381-3385. doi:
      10.1016/j.transproceed.2018.08.007. Epub 2018 Aug 9.