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Occup Environ Med. 2017 Jan;74(1):14-23. doi: 10.1136/oemed-2015-103334. Epub 2016 Aug 16.

Health risk factors as predictors of workers' compensation claim occurrence and cost.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Center for Health, Work, and Environment and Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
2
Department of Health Systems, Management & Policy, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
3
China Center for Health Development Studies, Peking University, Beijing, China.
4
Segue Consulting, Denver, Colorado, USA.
5
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Institute for Health and Productivity Studies, and Truven Health Analytics, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
6
Integrated Benefits Institute, San Francisco, California, USA.
7
Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.
8
Pinnacol Assurance, Denver, Colorado, USA.
9
Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
10
Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to examine the predictive relationships between employee health risk factors (HRFs) and workers' compensation (WC) claim occurrence and costs.

METHODS:

Logistic regression and generalised linear models were used to estimate the predictive association between HRFs and claim occurrence and cost among a cohort of 16 926 employees from 314 large, medium and small businesses across multiple industries. First, unadjusted (HRFs only) models were estimated, and second, adjusted (HRFs plus demographic and work organisation variables) were estimated.

RESULTS:

Unadjusted models demonstrated that several HRFs were predictive of WC claim occurrence and cost. After adjusting for demographic and work organisation differences between employees, many of the relationships previously established did not achieve statistical significance. Stress was the only HRF to display a consistent relationship with claim occurrence, though the type of stress mattered. Stress at work was marginally predictive of a higher odds of incurring a WC claim (p<0.10). Stress at home and stress over finances were predictive of higher and lower costs of claims, respectively (p<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

The unadjusted model results indicate that HRFs are predictive of future WC claims. However, the disparate findings between unadjusted and adjusted models indicate that future research is needed to examine the multilevel relationship between employee demographics, organisational factors, HRFs and WC claims.

KEYWORDS:

Health risk assessment; Occupational injury; Small business; Total Worker Health; Worksite wellness

PMID:
27530688
PMCID:
PMC5241501
DOI:
10.1136/oemed-2015-103334
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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