Format

Send to

Choose Destination
  • Showing results for a modified search because your search retrieved no results.
Vet Dermatol. 2017 Apr;28(2):171-e36. doi: 10.1111/vde.12404. Epub 2016 Dec 26.

Rifampicin treatment of canine pyoderma due to multidrug-resistant meticillin-resistant staphylococci: a retrospective study of 32 cases.

Author information

1
Clinica Veterinaria Privata San Marco, Via Sorio 114/C, 35141, Padova, Italy.
2
Department de Medicina i Cirurgia Animals, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193, Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain.
3
U.O. Qualità, Ricerca Organizzativa e Innovazione, AUSL della Romagna, Via De Gasperi 8, 48121, Ravenna, Italy.
4
Centre for Small Animal Studies, Animal Health Trust, Newmarket, Suffolk, CB8 7UU, UK.
5
Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, 200 Westboro Road, North Grafton, MA, 01536, USA.
6
Studio Dermatologico Veterinario, Via G. Sismondi 62, 20133, Milan, Italy.
7
Istituto Veterinario di Novara, SP 9 28060, Granozzo con Monticello (NO), Italy.
8
Veterinaria Cetego Via M.C. Cetego 20 and Ambulatorio Veterinario Trastevere Viale Glorioso 23, 00153, Roma, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Rifampicin has received increased interest in veterinary dermatology because of its activity against multidrug-resistant meticillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS). There is limited knowledge about the efficacy and safety of rifampicin in dogs.

HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVE:

To provide information on response to treatment and adverse effects in dogs treated with rifampicin for multidrug-resistant MRS pyoderma.

ANIMALS:

Thirty two dogs treated with rifampicin for rifampicin-susceptible multidrug-resistant MRS pyoderma.

METHODS:

Retrospective review of medical records, including alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) serum activity levels and total bilirubin concentrations, obtained before and throughout the treatment, was performed.

RESULTS:

Oral rifampicin as sole systemic antimicrobial therapy (median dose 5 mg/kg twice daily) was effective in 71.88% of cases. Topical antimicrobials were used in most cases. Median duration of rifampicin treatment was five weeks for superficial pyoderma and four weeks for deep pyoderma. Gastrointestinal signs were reported in 15% of treated dogs. Statistically significant increases of ALT (P = 0.045) and ALP (P = 0.0002) values after 3-4 weeks of treatment was observed. The median increase was equal to 0.3 and ×1.5 the upper limit of the reference ranges for ALT and ALP, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS/CLINICAL IMPORTANCE:

Oral rifampicin combined with topical antimicrobials can be considered an effective therapeutic option for canine superficial and deep pyoderma caused by rifampicin-susceptible multidrug-resistant MRS. Liver enzyme induction might be the most important cause of ALT and ALP increase associated with rifampicin therapy in dogs.

PMID:
28025853
DOI:
10.1111/vde.12404
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center