Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Development. 2018 Feb 14;145(4). pii: dev156836. doi: 10.1242/dev.156836.

ES cell-derived presomitic mesoderm-like tissues for analysis of synchronized oscillations in the segmentation clock.

Author information

1
Institute for Frontier Life and Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan.
2
Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan.
3
Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan.
4
Japan Science and Technology Agency, PRESTO, Saitama 332-0012, Japan.
5
Institute for Frontier Life and Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan rkageyam@infront.kyoto-u.ac.jp.
6
Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan.

Abstract

Somites are periodically formed by segmentation of the anterior parts of the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). In the mouse embryo, this periodicity is controlled by the segmentation clock gene Hes7, which exhibits wave-like oscillatory expression in the PSM. Despite intensive studies, the exact mechanism of such synchronous oscillatory dynamics of Hes7 expression still remains to be analyzed. Detailed analysis of the segmentation clock has been hampered because it requires the use of live embryos, and establishment of an in vitro culture system would facilitate such analyses. Here, we established a simple and efficient method to generate mouse ES cell-derived PSM-like tissues, in which Hes7 expression oscillates like traveling waves. In these tissues, Hes7 oscillation is synchronized between neighboring cells, and the posterior-anterior axis is self-organized as the central-peripheral axis. This method is applicable to chemical-library screening and will facilitate the analysis of the molecular nature of the segmentation clock.

KEYWORDS:

Chemical library screening; Embryonic stem cell; Induced presomitic mesoderm; Segmentation clock; Self-organization; Synchronized oscillation

PMID:
29437832
PMCID:
PMC5869006
DOI:
10.1242/dev.156836
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center