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Items: 1 to 50 of 161

1.

The stringent response is essential for Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence in the rat lung agar bead and Drosophila melanogaster feeding models of infection.

Vogt SL, Green C, Stevens KM, Day B, Erickson DL, Woods DE, Storey DG.

Infect Immun. 2011 Oct;79(10):4094-104. doi: 10.1128/IAI.00193-11. Epub 2011 Jul 25.

2.

Development and application of a cellular, gain-of-signal, bioluminescent reporter screen for inhibitors of type II secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

Moir DT, Di M, Wong E, Moore RA, Schweizer HP, Woods DE, Bowlin TL.

J Biomol Screen. 2011 Aug;16(7):694-705. doi: 10.1177/1087057111408605. Epub 2011 May 20.

3.

Burkholderia thailandensis oacA mutants facilitate the expression of Burkholderia mallei-like O polysaccharides.

Brett PJ, Burtnick MN, Heiss C, Azadi P, DeShazer D, Woods DE, Gherardini FC.

Infect Immun. 2011 Feb;79(2):961-9. doi: 10.1128/IAI.01023-10. Epub 2010 Nov 29.

4.

Identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei adhesins for human respiratory epithelial cells.

Balder R, Lipski S, Lazarus JJ, Grose W, Wooten RM, Hogan RJ, Woods DE, Lafontaine ER.

BMC Microbiol. 2010 Sep 28;10:250. doi: 10.1186/1471-2180-10-250.

5.

Characterization of the type III capsular polysaccharide produced by Burkholderia pseudomallei.

Reckseidler-Zenteno SL, Viteri DF, Moore R, Wong E, Tuanyok A, Woods DE.

J Med Microbiol. 2010 Dec;59(Pt 12):1403-14. doi: 10.1099/jmm.0.022202-0. Epub 2010 Aug 19.

PMID:
20724509
6.

Involvement of the MyD88-independent pathway in controlling the intracellular fate of Burkholderia pseudomallei infection in the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7.

Tangsudjai S, Pudla M, Limposuwan K, Woods DE, Sirisinha S, Utaisincharoen P.

Microbiol Immunol. 2010 May;54(5):282-90. doi: 10.1111/j.1348-0421.2010.00205.x.

7.

Burkholderia thailandensis harbors two identical rhl gene clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of rhamnolipids.

Dubeau D, Déziel E, Woods DE, Lépine F.

BMC Microbiol. 2009 Dec 17;9:263. doi: 10.1186/1471-2180-9-263.

8.
9.

Comparative in vivo and in vitro analyses of putative virulence factors of Burkholderia pseudomallei using lipopolysaccharide, capsule and flagellin mutants.

Wikraiphat C, Charoensap J, Utaisincharoen P, Wongratanacheewin S, Taweechaisupapong S, Woods DE, Bolscher JG, Sirisinha S.

FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 2009 Aug;56(3):253-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1574-695X.2009.00574.x. Epub 2009 May 30.

10.

Genetics and function of the capsules of Burkholderia pseudomallei and their potential as therapeutic targets.

Reckseidler-Zenteno SL, Moore R, Woods DE.

Mini Rev Med Chem. 2009 Feb;9(2):265-71. Review.

PMID:
19200030
11.

Cellular reporter screens for inhibitors of Burkholderia pseudomallei targets in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Moir DT, Di M, Moore RA, Schweizer HP, Woods DE.

Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2008 Dec;102 Suppl 1:S152-62. doi: 10.1016/S0035-9203(08)70033-6.

12.

Melioidosis risk in a tropical industrial environment.

Inglis TJ, Levy A, Merritt AJ, Hodge M, McDonald R, Woods DE.

Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2009 Jan;80(1):78-84.

PMID:
19141844
13.

Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei in water.

Moore RA, Tuanyok A, Woods DE.

BMC Res Notes. 2008 May 7;1:11. doi: 10.1186/1756-0500-1-11.

14.

Development of novel animal infection models for the study of acute and chronic Burkholderia pseudomallei pulmonary infections.

van Schaik E, Tom M, DeVinney R, Woods DE.

Microbes Infect. 2008 Oct;10(12-13):1291-9. doi: 10.1016/j.micinf.2008.07.028. Epub 2008 Jul 29.

PMID:
18707015
15.

Burkholderia pseudomallei, B. thailandensis, and B. ambifaria produce 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinoline analogues with a methyl group at the 3 position that is required for quorum-sensing regulation.

Vial L, Lépine F, Milot S, Groleau MC, Dekimpe V, Woods DE, Déziel E.

J Bacteriol. 2008 Aug;190(15):5339-52. doi: 10.1128/JB.00400-08. Epub 2008 Jun 6.

16.

Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secretion system mutants exhibit delayed vacuolar escape phenotypes in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages.

Burtnick MN, Brett PJ, Nair V, Warawa JM, Woods DE, Gherardini FC.

Infect Immun. 2008 Jul;76(7):2991-3000. doi: 10.1128/IAI.00263-08. Epub 2008 Apr 28.

17.

Inflammation patterns induced by different Burkholderia species in mice.

Wiersinga WJ, de Vos AF, de Beer R, Wieland CW, Roelofs JJ, Woods DE, van der Poll T.

Cell Microbiol. 2008 Jan;10(1):81-7. Epub 2007 Jul 20.

PMID:
17645551
18.
19.

The mviN homolog in Burkholderia pseudomallei is essential for viability and virulence.

Ling JM, Moore RA, Surette MG, Woods DE.

Can J Microbiol. 2006 Sep;52(9):831-42.

PMID:
17110975
20.
22.

Genome-wide expression analysis of iron regulation in Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei using DNA microarrays.

Tuanyok A, Kim HS, Nierman WC, Yu Y, Dunbar J, Moore RA, Baker P, Tom M, Ling JM, Woods DE.

FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2005 Nov 15;252(2):327-35. Epub 2005 Oct 10.

23.

Antimicrobial peptide therapeutics for cystic fibrosis.

Zhang L, Parente J, Harris SM, Woods DE, Hancock RE, Falla TJ.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2005 Jul;49(7):2921-7.

24.
25.

Aerosol treatment with MNEI suppresses bacterial proliferation in a model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection.

Woods DE, Cantin A, Cooley J, Kenney DM, Remold-O'Donnell E.

Pediatr Pulmonol. 2005 Feb;39(2):141-9.

PMID:
15633200
27.

Comparative genomic analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence.

Woods DE.

Trends Microbiol. 2004 Oct;12(10):437-9. Review. No abstract available.

PMID:
15381190
28.

Different domains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S activate distinct TLRs.

Epelman S, Stack D, Bell C, Wong E, Neely GG, Krutzik S, Miyake K, Kubes P, Zbytnuik LD, Ma LL, Xie X, Woods DE, Mody CH.

J Immunol. 2004 Aug 1;173(3):2031-40.

29.

Contribution of gene loss to the pathogenic evolution of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

Moore RA, Reckseidler-Zenteno S, Kim H, Nierman W, Yu Y, Tuanyok A, Warawa J, DeShazer D, Woods DE.

Infect Immun. 2004 Jul;72(7):4172-87.

30.

Characterization of experimental equine glanders.

Lopez J, Copps J, Wilhelmsen C, Moore R, Kubay J, St-Jacques M, Halayko S, Kranendonk C, Toback S, DeShazer D, Fritz DL, Tom M, Woods DE.

Microbes Infect. 2003 Oct;5(12):1125-31.

PMID:
14554254
31.

Comparative analysis of plant and animal models for characterization of Burkholderia cepacia virulence.

Bernier SP, Silo-Suh L, Woods DE, Ohman DE, Sokol PA.

Infect Immun. 2003 Sep;71(9):5306-13.

32.

An extracellular zinc metalloprotease gene of Burkholderia cepacia.

Corbett CR, Burtnick MN, Kooi C, Woods DE, Sokol PA.

Microbiology. 2003 Aug;149(Pt 8):2263-71.

PMID:
12904566
33.

Melioidosis vaccines.

Warawa J, Woods DE.

Expert Rev Vaccines. 2002 Dec;1(4):477-82. Review.

PMID:
12901586
34.
35.
36.

Flagellum-mediated adhesion by Burkholderia pseudomallei precedes invasion of Acanthamoeba astronyxis.

Inglis TJ, Robertson T, Woods DE, Dutton N, Chang BJ.

Infect Immun. 2003 Apr;71(4):2280-2.

37.
38.

Identification of genes encoding secreted proteins using mini-OphoA mutagenesis.

Burtnick MN, Brett PJ, Woods DE.

Methods Mol Biol. 2003;205:329-38. No abstract available.

PMID:
12491898
39.

Polyethylene glycol conjugation at Cys232 prolongs the half-life of alpha1 proteinase inhibitor.

Cantin AM, Woods DE, Cloutier D, Dufour EK, Leduc R.

Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2002 Dec;27(6):659-65.

PMID:
12444025
40.

The use of animal infection models to study the pathogenesis of melioidosis and glanders.

Woods DE.

Trends Microbiol. 2002 Nov;10(11):483-4; discussion 484-5. Review.

PMID:
12419603
41.

Leukocyte elastase inhibition therapy in cystic fibrosis: role of glycosylation on the distribution of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in blood versus lung.

Cantin AM, Woods DE, Cloutier D, Héroux J, Dufour EK, Leduc R.

J Aerosol Med. 2002 Summer;15(2):141-8.

PMID:
12184864
42.

Burkholderia thailandensis E125 harbors a temperate bacteriophage specific for Burkholderia mallei.

Woods DE, Jeddeloh JA, Fritz DL, DeShazer D.

J Bacteriol. 2002 Jul;184(14):4003-17.

43.

Distinct fates of monocytes and T cells directly activated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S.

Epelman S, Neely GG, Ma LL, Gjomarkaj M, Pace E, Melis M, Woods DE, Mody CH.

J Leukoc Biol. 2002 Mar;71(3):458-68.

PMID:
11867683
44.

Molecular and physical characterization of Burkholderia mallei O antigens.

Burtnick MN, Brett PJ, Woods DE.

J Bacteriol. 2002 Feb;184(3):849-52.

45.

Diffuse lamellar keratitis: isolation of endotoxin and demonstration of the inflammatory potential in a rabbit laser in situ keratomileusis model.

Peters NT, Iskander NG, Anderson Penno EE, Woods DE, Moore RA, Gimbel HV.

J Cataract Refract Surg. 2001 Jun;27(6):917-23.

PMID:
11408141
48.
49.

Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis clinical isolates produce exotoxin A with altered ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and cytotoxicity.

Gallant CV, Raivio TL, Olson JC, Woods DE, Storey DG.

Microbiology. 2000 Aug;146 ( Pt 8):1891-9.

PMID:
10931893
50.

Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S induces transcriptional expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines.

Epelman S, Bruno TF, Neely GG, Woods DE, Mody CH.

Infect Immun. 2000 Aug;68(8):4811-4.

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