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Items: 45

1.

Pore formation by Vibrio cholerae cytolysin follows the same archetypical mode as beta-barrel toxins from gram-positive organisms.

Löhner S, Walev I, Boukhallouk F, Palmer M, Bhakdi S, Valeva A.

FASEB J. 2009 Aug;23(8):2521-8. doi: 10.1096/fj.08-127688. Epub 2009 Mar 10.

PMID:
19276173
2.

Putative identification of an amphipathic alpha-helical sequence in hemolysin of Escherichia coli (HlyA) involved in transmembrane pore formation.

Valeva A, Siegel I, Wylenzek M, Wassenaar TM, Weis S, Heinz N, Schmitt R, Fischer C, Reinartz R, Bhakdi S, Walev I.

Biol Chem. 2008 Sep;389(9):1201-7. doi: 10.1515/BC.2008.136.

PMID:
18713007
3.

Pro-inflammatory feedback activation cycle evoked by attack of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin on human neutrophil granulocytes.

Valeva A, Walev I, Weis S, Boukhallouk F, Wassenaar TM, Bhakdi S.

Med Microbiol Immunol. 2008 Sep;197(3):285-93. Epub 2007 Sep 20.

PMID:
17882454
4.

Evidence that clustered phosphocholine head groups serve as sites for binding and assembly of an oligomeric protein pore.

Valeva A, Hellmann N, Walev I, Strand D, Plate M, Boukhallouk F, Brack A, Hanada K, Decker H, Bhakdi S.

J Biol Chem. 2006 Sep 8;281(36):26014-21. Epub 2006 Jul 9.

5.

Why Escherichia coli alpha-hemolysin induces calcium oscillations in mammalian cells--the pore is on its own.

Koschinski A, Repp H, Unver B, Dreyer F, Brockmeier D, Valeva A, Bhakdi S, Walev I.

FASEB J. 2006 May;20(7):973-5. Epub 2006 Apr 5.

PMID:
16597673
6.

Binding of Escherichia coli hemolysin and activation of the target cells is not receptor-dependent.

Valeva A, Walev I, Kemmer H, Weis S, Siegel I, Boukhallouk F, Wassenaar TM, Chavakis T, Bhakdi S.

J Biol Chem. 2005 Nov 4;280(44):36657-63. Epub 2005 Aug 30.

7.

Activation of mast cells by streptolysin O and lipopolysaccharide.

Stassen M, Valeva A, Walev I, Schmitt E.

Methods Mol Biol. 2006;315:393-403.

PMID:
16110172
8.

Identification of the membrane penetrating domain of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin as a beta-barrel structure.

Valeva A, Walev I, Boukhallouk F, Wassenaar TM, Heinz N, Hedderich J, Lautwein S, Möcking M, Weis S, Zitzer A, Bhakdi S.

Mol Microbiol. 2005 Jul;57(1):124-31.

9.

A cellular metalloproteinase activates Vibrio cholerae pro-cytolysin.

Valeva A, Walev I, Weis S, Boukhallouk F, Wassenaar TM, Endres K, Fahrenholz F, Bhakdi S, Zitzer A.

J Biol Chem. 2004 Jun 11;279(24):25143-8. Epub 2004 Apr 5.

10.
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12.

Stability of phospholipase D in primary astrocytes.

Jin S, Schatter B, Weichel O, Walev I, Ryu S, Klein J.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2002 Sep 27;297(3):545-51.

PMID:
12270129
13.

Resealing of large transmembrane pores produced by streptolysin O in nucleated cells is accompanied by NF-kappaB activation and downstream events.

Walev I, Hombach M, Bobkiewicz W, Fenske D, Bhakdi S, Husmann M.

FASEB J. 2002 Feb;16(2):237-9. Epub 2001 Dec 14.

PMID:
11744625
14.

Membrane insertion of the heptameric staphylococcal alpha-toxin pore. A domino-like structural transition that is allosterically modulated by the target cell membrane.

Valeva A, Schnabel R, Walev I, Boukhallouk F, Bhakdi S, Palmer M.

J Biol Chem. 2001 May 4;276(18):14835-41. Epub 2001 Feb 2.

15.

Delivery of proteins into living cells by reversible membrane permeabilization with streptolysin-O.

Walev I, Bhakdi SC, Hofmann F, Djonder N, Valeva A, Aktories K, Bhakdi S.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2001 Mar 13;98(6):3185-90. Epub 2001 Mar 6.

16.
17.

Potassium regulates IL-1 beta processing via calcium-independent phospholipase A2.

Walev I, Klein J, Husmann M, Valeva A, Strauch S, Wirtz H, Weichel O, Bhakdi S.

J Immunol. 2000 May 15;164(10):5120-4.

18.

Staphylococcal alpha-toxin: repair of a calcium-impermeable pore in the target cell membrane.

Valeva A, Walev I, Gerber A, Klein J, Palmer M, Bhakdi S.

Mol Microbiol. 2000 Apr;36(2):467-76.

19.

Complement activation by oxidatively modified low-density lipoproteins.

Wieland E, Dorweiler B, Bonitz U, Lieser S, Walev I, Bhakdi S.

Eur J Clin Invest. 1999 Oct;29(10):835-41.

PMID:
10583425
20.

Streptolysin O: inhibition of the conformational change during membrane binding of the monomer prevents oligomerization and pore formation.

Abdel Ghani EM, Weis S, Walev I, Kehoe M, Bhakdi S, Palmer M.

Biochemistry. 1999 Nov 16;38(46):15204-11.

PMID:
10563803
21.

Cytotoxic action of Serratia marcescens hemolysin on human epithelial cells.

Hertle R, Hilger M, Weingardt-Kocher S, Walev I.

Infect Immun. 1999 Feb;67(2):817-25.

22.

Pore-forming bacterial cytolysins.

Bhakdi S, Valeva A, Walev I, Zitzer A, Palmer M.

Symp Ser Soc Appl Microbiol. 1998;27:15S-25S. Review. No abstract available.

PMID:
9750358
23.

Transmembrane beta-barrel of staphylococcal alpha-toxin forms in sensitive but not in resistant cells.

Valeva A, Walev I, Pinkernell M, Walker B, Bayley H, Palmer M, Bhakdi S.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1997 Oct 14;94(21):11607-11.

24.

Potent membrane-permeabilizing and cytocidal action of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin on human intestinal cells.

Zitzer A, Wassenaar TM, Walev I, Bhakdi S.

Infect Immun. 1997 Apr;65(4):1293-8.

26.
27.

Pore-forming toxins trigger shedding of receptors for interleukin 6 and lipopolysaccharide.

Walev I, Vollmer P, Palmer M, Bhakdi S, Rose-John S.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1996 Jul 23;93(15):7882-7.

28.
29.

Staphylococcal alpha-toxin, streptolysin-O, and Escherichia coli hemolysin: prototypes of pore-forming bacterial cytolysins.

Bhakdi S, Bayley H, Valeva A, Walev I, Walker B, Kehoe M, Palmer M.

Arch Microbiol. 1996 Feb;165(2):73-9. Review.

PMID:
8593102
30.

Replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 in the medulla of the adrenal gland after vaginal infection of mice.

Podlech J, Hengerer F, Fleck M, Walev I, Falke D.

Arch Virol. 1996;141(10):1999-2008.

PMID:
8920831
31.

Pathogenesis of sepsis syndrome: possible relevance of pore-forming bacterial toxins.

Bhakdi S, Walev I, Jonas D, Palmer M, Weller U, Suttorp N, Grimminger F, Seeger W.

Curr Top Microbiol Immunol. 1996;216:101-18. Review. No abstract available.

PMID:
8791737
32.

On the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis: enzymatic transformation of human low density lipoprotein to an atherogenic moiety.

Bhakdi S, Dorweiler B, Kirchmann R, Torzewski J, Weise E, Tranum-Jensen J, Walev I, Wieland E.

J Exp Med. 1995 Dec 1;182(6):1959-71.

33.

Characterization of Vibrio cholerae El Tor cytolysin as an oligomerizing pore-forming toxin.

Zitzer A, Walev I, Palmer M, Bhakdi S.

Med Microbiol Immunol. 1995 May;184(1):37-44.

PMID:
8538577
34.

Potassium-inhibited processing of IL-1 beta in human monocytes.

Walev I, Reske K, Palmer M, Valeva A, Bhakdi S.

EMBO J. 1995 Apr 18;14(8):1607-14.

35.
36.
38.

Recovery of human fibroblasts from attack by the pore-forming alpha-toxin of Staphylococcus aureus.

Walev I, Palmer M, Martin E, Jonas D, Weller U, Höhn-Bentz H, Husmann M, Bhakdi S.

Microb Pathog. 1994 Sep;17(3):187-201.

PMID:
7535374
39.
41.

Staphylococcal alpha-toxin kills human keratinocytes by permeabilizing the plasma membrane for monovalent ions.

Walev I, Martin E, Jonas D, Mohamadzadeh M, Müller-Klieser W, Kunz L, Bhakdi S.

Infect Immun. 1993 Dec;61(12):4972-9.

42.

A guide to the use of pore-forming toxins for controlled permeabilization of cell membranes.

Bhakdi S, Weller U, Walev I, Martin E, Jonas D, Palmer M.

Med Microbiol Immunol. 1993 Sep;182(4):167-75. Review.

PMID:
8232069
43.
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45.

Characterization of fusion from without induced by herpes simplex virus.

Walev I, Wollert KC, Weise K, Falke D.

Arch Virol. 1991;117(1-2):29-44.

PMID:
1848750

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