Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ann Thorac Surg. 2010 Jul;90(1):136-43. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2010.03.046.

Early and midterm hemodynamics after aortic valve bypass (apicoaortic conduit) surgery.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Aortic valve bypass (AVB [apicoaortic conduit]) relieves aortic stenosis (AS) by connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending thoracic aorta with a valved conduit. AVB is performed through a small left thoracotomy, without cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic cross-clamping, cardiac arrest, or debridement of the native aortic valve. Little is known about hemodynamics, including ventricular performance, relative conduit blood flow, and progression of native AS after AVB.

METHODS:

Forty-seven very high risk patients underwent AVB for AS between 2003 and 2009. The mean age was 82 years. Predismissal and interval transthoracic quantitative two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography was performed in a core laboratory.

RESULTS:

No patient had obstruction of the native aortic valve or the conduit during follow-up. The AVB effectively relieved left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (average peak gradient across the conduit was 5.6 +/- 3.8 mm Hg). Native aortic valve stenosis did not progress after AVB (0.63 +/- 0.16 cm(2) before surgery to 0.7 +/- 0.24 cm(2) at latest follow-up more than 6 months; p = 0.16). Total stroke volume increased after AVB from 60 mL +/- 22 mL to 107 mL +/- 27 mL (p < 0.0001). Left ventricular outflow was distributed in a predictable fashion between the conduit and the native aortic valve, with 63% +/- 10% of the flow directed to the conduit. Relative conduit flow remained stable (68% +/- 8%) at latest follow-up more than 6 months (p = 0.17).

CONCLUSIONS:

Aortic valve bypass effectively relieves the outflow tract obstruction of AS. Placement of an apical valved conduit halts the biologic progression of AS.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center