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J Immunol. 2015 Apr 1;194(7):2985-91. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1403134.

Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells in cancer pathogenesis.

Author information

1
Division of Gynecologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55906;
2
Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55906; and Cancer Vaccines and Immune Therapies Program, Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute, Port St. Lucie, FL 34987.
3
Cancer Vaccines and Immune Therapies Program, Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute, Port St. Lucie, FL 34987.
4
Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55906; and Cancer Vaccines and Immune Therapies Program, Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute, Port St. Lucie, FL 34987 knutson.keith@mayo.edu.

Abstract

Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the tumor microenvironment, which is known to affect disease progression in many human malignancies. Infiltration by mature, active DCs into the tumors confers an increase in immune activation and recruitment of disease-fighting immune effector cells and pathways. DCs are the preferential target of infiltrating T cells. However, tumor cells have means of suppressing DC function or of altering the tumor microenvironment in such a way that immune-suppressive DCs are recruited. Advances in understanding these changes have led to promising developments in cancer-therapeutic strategies targeting tumor-infiltrating DCs to subdue their immunosuppressive functions and enhance their immune-stimulatory capacity.

PMID:
25795789
PMCID:
PMC4369768
DOI:
10.4049/jimmunol.1403134
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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