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Science. 2019 Oct 11;366(6462):221-226. doi: 10.1126/science.aao6640.

Spatial control of heavy-fermion superconductivity in CeIrIn5.

Author information

1
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, D-01187 Dresden, Germany.
2
School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS, UK.
3
Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.
4
Institute for Theoretical Physics, Technical University Dresden, D-01062 Dresden, Germany.
5
Institute of Material Science and Engineering, École Polytechnique Fédéral de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
6
Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Garching, D-85748 Germany.
7
Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA.
8
Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. philip.moll@epfl.ch kcn34@cornell.edu.
9
Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.
10
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, D-01187 Dresden, Germany. philip.moll@epfl.ch kcn34@cornell.edu.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

Although crystals of strongly correlated metals exhibit a diverse set of electronic ground states, few approaches exist for spatially modulating their properties. In this study, we demonstrate disorder-free control, on the micrometer scale, over the superconducting state in samples of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeIrIn5 We pattern crystals by focused ion beam milling to tailor the boundary conditions for the elastic deformation upon thermal contraction during cooling. The resulting nonuniform strain fields induce complex patterns of superconductivity, owing to the strong dependence of the transition temperature on the strength and direction of strain. These results showcase a generic approach to manipulating electronic order on micrometer length scales in strongly correlated matter without compromising the cleanliness, stoichiometry, or mean free path.

PMID:
31601766
DOI:
10.1126/science.aao6640

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