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J Rheumatol. 2019 Apr 1. pii: jrheum.181201. doi: 10.3899/jrheum.181201. [Epub ahead of print]

Considerations for Evaluating and Recommending Worker Productivity Outcome Measures: An Update from the OMERACT Worker Productivity Group.

Author information

1
From the Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre; UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Manchester Biomedical Research Centre, Manchester University Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester; Arthritis Research UK/Medical Research Council (MRC) Centre for Musculoskeletal Health and Work, University of Southampton, Southampton; National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society (NRAS), Maidenhead, UK; Department of Medicine, and the Division of Rheumatology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Arthritis Research Canada, Richmond, British Columbia; Institute for Work & Health; University of Toronto, Toronto; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, and School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa; Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Division of Rheumatology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Care and Public Health Research Institute (CAPHRI), Maastricht; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA; Swiss Paraplegic Research, Nottwil, Switzerland; Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden; Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania; School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Kensington, Australia. S.M. Verstappen, PhD, MSc, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, and NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre, Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, and Arthritis Research UK/MRC Centre for Musculoskeletal Health and Work, University of Southampton; D. Lacaille, MDCM, FRCPC, MHSc, Department of Medicine, and the Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, and Arthritis Research Canada; A. Boonen, MD, PhD, Division of Rheumatology, Maastricht University Medical Center, CAPHRI; R. Escorpizo, BSc, MSc, DPT, Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Science, University of Vermont, and Swiss Paraplegic Research; C. Hofstetter, OMERACT Patient Research Partner; A. Bosworth, MBE, OMERACT Patient Research Partner, NRAS; A. Leong, OMERACT Patient Research Partner; S. Leggett, MSc, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre; M.A. Gignac, PhD, Institute for Work & Health, and University of Toronto; J.K. Wallman, MD, PhD, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Rheumatology; M.M. Ter Wee, PhD, MSc, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Department of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Infection and Immunity Institute, Amsterdam Public Health; F. Berghea, MD, PhD, Carol Davila University of Medicine; M. Agaliotis, PhD, MSc, Australian Institute of Health Management Services, University of Tasmania; P. Tugwell, MD, MSc, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, and School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, and Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute; D. Beaton, PhD, Institute for Work & Health, and University of Toronto. Address correspondence to Dr. S.M.M. Verstappen, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK. E-mail: Suzanne.Verstappen@manchester.ac.uk. Accepted for publication March 22, 2019.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Worker Productivity Group continues efforts to assess psychometric properties of measures of presenteeism.

METHODS:

Psychometric properties of single-item and dual answer multiitem scales were assessed, as well as methods to evaluate thresholds of meaning.

RESULTS:

Test-retest reliability and construct validity of single item global measures was moderate to good. The value of measuring both degree of difficulty and amount of time with difficulty in multiitems questionnaires was confirmed. Thresholds of meaning vary depending on methods and external anchors applied.

CONCLUSION:

We have advanced our understanding of the performance of presenteeism measures and have developed approaches to describing thresholds of meaning.

PMID:
30936275
DOI:
10.3899/jrheum.181201

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