Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Environ Geochem Health. 2007 Feb;29(1):51-8. Epub 2006 Nov 25.

Dental fluorosis associated with drinking water from hot springs in Choma district in southern province, Zambia.

Author information

1
Department of Soil Science, School of Agricultural Sciences, University of Zambia, 32379, Lusaka, Zambia. shitumbanuma@zamtel.zm

Abstract

This study was conducted to investigate the high incidence of mottled teeth among residents of an area with hot springs in the Choma District of the Southern Province of Zambia. A survey involving 128 pupils was conducted at a Basic School to collect data on pupil's backgrounds and their main sources of drinking water between birth and age 7. A dental specialist examined the pupils' teeth and samples of drinking water were collected from locations where the majority of the pupils lived. It was analysed for fluorides and other drinking water quality parameters. Results of the survey showed a highly significant (P < 0.001) association between pupils' main sources of drinking water between birth and age 7 and the incidence of discoloured teeth. All (100%) pupils who drank water from hot springs before age 7 had moderate to severe fluorosis, while the majority (96.7%) of the pupils who drank water from other sources had no dental fluorosis. Fluoride concentrations ranged from 5.95 to 10.09 mg/l in water from hot springs, and from 0.03 to 0.6 mg/l in water from other sources. Fluoride levels in water from hot spring water samples exceeded the 1.5 mg/l WHO guideline value for drinking water, while those in water from other sources were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than this. We conclude that the high prevalence of mottled teeth among residents of the study area is a case of endemic dental fluorosis associated with drinking water from hot springs containing high concentrations of fluoride.

PMID:
17260169
DOI:
10.1007/s10653-006-9062-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center