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Biol Open. 2018 Oct 2;7(9). pii: bio035923. doi: 10.1242/bio.035923.

Viability of dietary substitution of live microalgae with dry Ulva rigida in broodstock conditioning of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

Author information

1
Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine Environmental Research (CIIMAR), University of Porto, Terminal de Cruzeiros do Porto de Leixões, Av. General Norton de Matos s/n, 4450-208 Matosinhos, Portugal.
2
Department of Sea and Marine Resources, Portuguese Institute for Sea and Atmosphere (IPMA, I.P.), Av. 5 de Outubro s/n, 8700-305, Olhão, Portugal.
3
Laboratory of Engineering of Processes, Environment, Biotechnology and Energy (LEPABE), Rua Dr Roberto Frias, P-4200-264 Porto, Portugal.
4
Department of Chemical Sciences (LAQV/REQUIMTE), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, P-4050-313 Porto, Portugal.
5
Department of Aquatic Production, Abel Salazar Biomedical Sciences Institute (ICBAS), University of Porto, Rua Jorge de Viterbo Ferreira 228 4050-313 Porto, Portugal.
6
Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine Environmental Research (CIIMAR), University of Porto, Terminal de Cruzeiros do Porto de Leixões, Av. General Norton de Matos s/n, 4450-208 Matosinhos, Portugal dmatias@ipma.pt.

Abstract

The current study evaluated the microalgae replacement by dry macroalgae (Ulva rigida) in the reproductive success and biochemical composition of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) during broodstock conditioning. Five nutritional regimes were tested: 100% macroalgae (diet 1), 50% macroalgae+50% microalgae (diet 2), 25% macroalgae+75% microalgae (diet 3) and 100% microalgae (diet 4). An unfed group was used as a negative control. The microalgae blend was composed of 33% Isochrysis galbana and 67% diatoms (75% Skeletonema costatum+25% Chaetoceros calcitrans). Gonadal maturation was reflected in the physiological condition of the individuals. All treatments, except diet 1, showed an increase in condition index and were fully matured at the end of the trial, with the best physiological condition observed in oysters fed diet 3 and diet 4. Protein and total lipid content increased during the conditioning period, whereas glycogen content decreased. Oysters conditioned with diet 3 had higher protein and total lipid content and lower glycogen content than the other treatments. In addition, diet 3 showed the highest percentage of viable veliger larvae. The current study demonstrated that it is possible to replace 25% of microalgae with macroalgae in the broodstock conditioning, minimizing the operative cost in bivalve hatcheries.This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper.

KEYWORDS:

Biochemical composition; Conditioning; Dietary introduction; Dry macroalgae; Pacific oyster; Spawning

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interestsThe authors declare no competing or financial interests.

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