Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Science. 2018 May 25;360(6391):915-918. doi: 10.1126/science.aas9315.

An ingestible bacterial-electronic system to monitor gastrointestinal health.

Author information

1
Microbiology Program, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
2
Synthetic Biology Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
3
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
4
Division of Comparative Medicine, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
5
Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
6
Division of Pediatric Gastroentrology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
7
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
8
Department of Chemical Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
9
Division of Gastroenterology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
10
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. timlu@mit.edu anantha@mtl.mit.edu.
11
Synthetic Biology Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. timlu@mit.edu anantha@mtl.mit.edu.
12
Department of Biological Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

Biomolecular monitoring in the gastrointestinal tract could offer rapid, precise disease detection and management but is impeded by access to the remote and complex environment. Here, we present an ingestible micro-bio-electronic device (IMBED) for in situ biomolecular detection based on environmentally resilient biosensor bacteria and miniaturized luminescence readout electronics that wirelessly communicate with an external device. As a proof of concept, we engineer heme-sensitive probiotic biosensors and demonstrate accurate diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding in swine. Additionally, we integrate alternative biosensors to demonstrate modularity and extensibility of the detection platform. IMBEDs enable new opportunities for gastrointestinal biomarker discovery and could transform the management and diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease.

Comment in

PMID:
29798884
DOI:
10.1126/science.aas9315
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center