Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2019 Feb 8. pii: JAAPL.003816-19. doi: 10.29158/JAAPL.003816-19. [Epub ahead of print]

Use of Manifest Injustice in the Washington State Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration.

Author information

1
Dr. Sussman is a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellow with the Cambridge Health Alliance, Harvard Medical School Teaching Hospital, Boston, MA. Dr. Lee is an Associate Professor, Division of Public Behavioral Health & Justice Policy, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Dr. Hallgren is an Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. nicole.sussman@gmail.com.
2
Dr. Sussman is a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellow with the Cambridge Health Alliance, Harvard Medical School Teaching Hospital, Boston, MA. Dr. Lee is an Associate Professor, Division of Public Behavioral Health & Justice Policy, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Dr. Hallgren is an Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Abstract

In the Washington State Juvenile Code, the Manifest Injustice (MI) provision allows judges to sentence youth outside of the standard guidelines. We compared rates of Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration (JRA) involvement and MI between racial minority youth and Caucasian youth. Although not statistically significant, there was a trend toward African American and multiracial youth having MI used to decrease their sentence less frequently than Caucasian youth. African American youth were about half as likely to have MI used to intensify their sentence compared with Caucasian youth (rate ratio = .49, p = .002), whereas multiracial youth were 42 percent less likely (rate ratio = .58, p = .04). More African American youth reside in urban and liberal parts of the state where judges may be more progressive and less likely to use MI to intensify sentences. More diversion programs targeting minority youth exist in urban areas of Washington, and more African American youth are transferred to adult court; both reduce the likelihood of minority youth receiving MI. Judges in rural areas of the state, which have fewer treatment resources, may be using MI to access services only available to court-involved youth. It is imperative that community behavioral health services are available so that youth and families can be justly served.

PMID:
30737295
DOI:
10.29158/JAAPL.003816-19

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center