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J Dent Educ. 2019 Mar;83(3):287-295. doi: 10.21815/JDE.019.024. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Improving Diversity of Dental Students Through the Boston University Master's of Oral Health Sciences Postbaccalaureate Program.

Author information

1
Theresa A. Davies, PhD, is Director of the MS in Oral Health Sciences Program and Assistant Dean for Graduate Affairs, Graduate Medical Sciences, and Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences & Education, Boston University School of Medicine; Elizabeth Kaye, PhD, MPH, is Professor, Department of Health Policy & Health Services Research, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine; Michele Stahlberger, MS, is a recent graduate of the Master's in Biomedical Forensic Sciences Program, Boston University School of Medicine; Majed Abbas, MS, is a recent graduate of the Master's in Medical Sciences Program, Boston University School of Medicine; Catherine Sarkis, MBA, JD, is Assistant Dean for Admissions and Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Health Policy & Health Services Research, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine; Linda Reed, MEd, is Director of Admissions, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine; Larry Dunham, DMD, is Director of Diversity & Multicultural Affairs and Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of General Dentistry, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine; Barbara M. Schreiber, PhD, is Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine; Cataldo Leone, DMD, DMSc, is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor, Departments of Periodontology and Molecular & Cell Biology, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine; and Ana Karina Mascarenhas, BDS, MPH, DrPH, is Associate Dean of Research, Nova Southeastern College of Dental Medicine tdavies@bu.edu.
2
Theresa A. Davies, PhD, is Director of the MS in Oral Health Sciences Program and Assistant Dean for Graduate Affairs, Graduate Medical Sciences, and Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences & Education, Boston University School of Medicine; Elizabeth Kaye, PhD, MPH, is Professor, Department of Health Policy & Health Services Research, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine; Michele Stahlberger, MS, is a recent graduate of the Master's in Biomedical Forensic Sciences Program, Boston University School of Medicine; Majed Abbas, MS, is a recent graduate of the Master's in Medical Sciences Program, Boston University School of Medicine; Catherine Sarkis, MBA, JD, is Assistant Dean for Admissions and Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Health Policy & Health Services Research, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine; Linda Reed, MEd, is Director of Admissions, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine; Larry Dunham, DMD, is Director of Diversity & Multicultural Affairs and Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of General Dentistry, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine; Barbara M. Schreiber, PhD, is Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine; Cataldo Leone, DMD, DMSc, is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor, Departments of Periodontology and Molecular & Cell Biology, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine; and Ana Karina Mascarenhas, BDS, MPH, DrPH, is Associate Dean of Research, Nova Southeastern College of Dental Medicine.

Abstract

Boston University Goldman School of Dental Medicine (GSDM), in collaboration with Boston University School of Medicine, introduced the Oral Health Sciences (OHS) pipeline program in 2005 to enhance the academic preparedness of students from underrepresented minority (URM) groups for dental school admission. The aim of this study was to evaluate the OHS program's success in preparing URM students for dental school, as measured by acceptance to dental school and performance in the first and second years. Data on 2005-15 program enrollees were collected from admissions records, the registrar, and the Office of Institutional Research on students' race/ethnicity, undergraduate and OHS grade point average (GPA), and Dental Admission Test (DAT) scores. Acceptance to dental school and performance at GSDM for non-URM OHS graduates, URM OHS graduates, and non-OHS dental students were compared. A total of 55 URM students completed the OHS program during this period, with 49 successfully matriculating to a dental school in the U.S. and 33 attending GSDM. Average OHS GPA was higher for those URM students accepted to dental school than for those who did not gain admission (3.36±0.30 vs. 2.94±0.19). Evaluation of the academic performance of URM OHS students in the first year (p=0.13) and second year (p=0.88) at GSDM showed that these students performed as well as the non-OHS and non-URM OHS students. These results demonstrate that the OHS master's program serves as a successful credential-enhancing program for dental school applicants, while also serving as a pipeline to increase the number of qualified applicants from URM groups.

KEYWORDS:

academic performance; dental education; dental school admissions; dental students; mentoring; minority recruitment; postbaccalaureate program; predental education; predental master’s program; underrepresented minority students

PMID:
30692183
DOI:
10.21815/JDE.019.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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