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J Neurosci Methods. 2019 May 15;320:26-36. doi: 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2019.02.010. Epub 2019 Mar 5.

ReStore: A wireless peripheral nerve stimulation system.

Author information

1
The University of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Bioengineering, 800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080-3021, United States; The University of Texas at Dallas, Texas Biomedical Device Center, 800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080-3021, United States.
2
The University of Texas at Dallas, Texas Biomedical Device Center, 800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080-3021, United States.
3
The University of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Bioengineering, 800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080-3021, United States; The University of Texas at Dallas, Texas Biomedical Device Center, 800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080-3021, United States; The University of Texas at Dallas, School of Behavioral Brain Sciences, 800 West Campbell Road, GR41, Richardson, TX 75080-3021, United States.
4
Teliatry, Inc., 1301 N Plano Rd, Richardson, TX 75081, United States.
5
The University of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Bioengineering, 800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080-3021, United States; The University of Texas at Dallas, Texas Biomedical Device Center, 800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080-3021, United States; The University of Texas at Dallas, School of Behavioral Brain Sciences, 800 West Campbell Road, GR41, Richardson, TX 75080-3021, United States. Electronic address: renn@utdallas.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The growing use of neuromodulation techniques to treat neurological disorders has motivated efforts to improve on the safety and reliability of implantable nerve stimulators.

NEW METHOD:

The present study describes the ReStore system, a miniature, implantable wireless nerve stimulator system that has no battery or leads and is constructed using commercial components and processes. The implant can be programmed wirelessly to deliver charge-balanced, biphasic current pulses of varying amplitudes, pulse widths, frequencies, and train durations. Here, we describe bench and in vivo testing to evaluate the operational performance and efficacy of nerve recruitment. Additionally, we also provide results from a large-animal chronic active stimulation study assessing the long-term biocompatibility of the device.

RESULTS:

The results show that the system can reliably deliver accurate stimulation pulses through a range of different loads. Tests of nerve recruitment demonstrate that the implant can effectively activate peripheral nerves, even after accelerated aging and post-chronic implantation. Biocompatibility and hermeticity tests provide an initial indication that the implant will be safe for use in humans.

COMPARISON WITH EXISTING METHOD(S):

Most commercially available nerve stimulators include a battery and wire leads which often require subsequent surgeries to address failures in these components. Though miniaturized battery-less stimulators have been prototyped in academic labs, they are often constructed using custom components and processes that hinder clinical translation.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results from testing the performance and safety of the ReStore system establish its potential to advance the field of peripheral neuromodulation.

KEYWORDS:

Implantable pulse generator; Integrated electrodes; Nerve stimulator; Neuromodulation; Telemetry; Wireless

PMID:
30849436
PMCID:
PMC6529940
[Available on 2020-05-15]
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneumeth.2019.02.010

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