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Respir Care. 2015 Apr;60(4):477-83. doi: 10.4187/respcare.03584. Epub 2014 Dec 9.

Efficacy of mechanical insufflation-exsufflation in extubating unweanable subjects with restrictive pulmonary disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, University Hospital, Newark, New Jersey bachjr@njms.rutgers.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, University Hospital, Newark, New Jersey.
3
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, University Hospital, Newark, New Jersey.
4
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Kessler Foundation, West Orange, New Jersey.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Subjects who do not pass ventilator weaning parameters but whose ambient air oxyhemoglobin saturation can be normalized by mechanical insufflation-exsufflation (MIE) can be extubated to continuous noninvasive ventilatory support (CNVS) with MIE used to maintain extubation. Our aim was to study MIE-associated changes in breathing tolerance, pulse oximetry, and vital capacity (VC) for consecutive unweanable subjects.

METHODS:

A retrospective chart review was performed for consecutively referred intubated subjects with single-organ (respiratory muscle) failure. At presentation, CO2 was normalized by adjusting ventilator settings and VC was measured (point 1). Then, MIE was used via the tube up to every h until oximetry remained ≥ 95% on ambient air and VC was remeasured (point 2) immediately before extubation. Subjects who could not meet ventilator weaning criteria and had no ventilator-free breathing ability upon extubation to CNVS were enrolled. Post-extubation, the MIE was used to maintain oximetry ≥ 95% in room air. VC and breathing tolerance were remeasured within 3 weeks (point 3).

RESULTS:

Ninety-seven of 98 subjects were successfully extubated despite 45 having been CNVS-dependent for 4 months to 18 y before being intubated. Sixty-nine of the 98 were intubated for 24.9 ± 22 (range 1-158) d and failed 0-6 (mean 1.7) extubation attempts before being transferred and successfully extubated in 2.24 ± 1.78 (range < 1-8) d to CNVS. VC increased by 270% (P < .001) from points 1 to 3. Weaning from CNVS to part-time NVS was achieved by all 52 subjects who had not been CNVS-dependent before intubation. One subject underwent tracheotomy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Many unweanable subjects can be extubated to CNVS and MIE. The latter can normalize O2 saturation, increase VC, and facilitate extubation.

KEYWORDS:

Duchenne muscular dystrophy; mechanical insufflation-exsufflation; neuromuscular disease; noninvasive ventilation; respiratory; spinal cord injury

PMID:
25492956
DOI:
10.4187/respcare.03584
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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