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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Feb 15;102(7):2390-5. Epub 2005 Feb 4.

Force mapping in epithelial cell migration.

Author information

1
Laboratoire de Biorhéologie et d'Hydrodynamique Physico-Chimique, Unité Mixte de Recherche Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique 7057, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique FR2438, Université Paris, 75251 Paris Cedex 05, France.

Erratum in

  • Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Sep 27;102(39):14122. Siberzan, Pascal [corrected to Silberzan, Pascal].

Abstract

We measure dynamic traction forces exerted by epithelial cells on a substrate. The force sensor is a high-density array of elastomeric microfabricated pillars that support the cells. Traction forces induced by cell migration are deduced from the measurement of the bending of these pillars and are correlated with actin localization by fluorescence microscopy. We use a multiple-particle tracking method to estimate the mechanical activity of cells in real time with a high-spatial resolution (down to 2 microm) imposed by the periodicity of the post array. For these experiments, we use differentiated Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells. Our data provide definite information on mechanical forces exerted by a cellular assembly. The maximum intensity of the forces is localized on the edge of the epithelia. Hepatocyte growth factor promotes cell motility and induces strong scattering activity of MDCK cells. Thus, we compare forces generated by MDCK cells in subconfluent epithelia versus isolated cells after hepatocyte growth factor treatment. Maximal-traction stresses at the edge of a monolayer correspond to higher values than those measured for a single cell and may be due to a collective behavior.

PMID:
15695588
PMCID:
PMC548966
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.0408482102
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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