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Sci Transl Med. 2017 Feb 15;9(377). pii: eaai8700. doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aai8700.

Fasting-mimicking diet and markers/risk factors for aging, diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease.

Author information

1
Longevity Institute, School of Gerontology, and Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.
3
Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.
5
Department of Internal and Complementary Medicine, Charité University Medical Center, 10117 Berlin, Germany.
6
Department of Clinical Medicine, Sapienza University, 00185 Rome, Italy.
7
Longevity Institute, School of Gerontology, and Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA. vlongo@usc.edu.
8
FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology, Italian Foundation for Cancer Research Institute of Molecular Oncology, 20139 Milan, Italy.

Abstract

Calorie restriction or changes in dietary composition can enhance healthy aging, but the inability of most subjects to adhere to chronic and extreme diets, as well as potentially adverse effects, limits their application. We randomized 100 generally healthy participants from the United States into two study arms and tested the effects of a fasting-mimicking diet (FMD)-low in calories, sugars, and protein but high in unsaturated fats-on markers/risk factors associated with aging and age-related diseases. We compared subjects who followed 3 months of an unrestricted diet to subjects who consumed the FMD for 5 consecutive days per month for 3 months. Three FMD cycles reduced body weight, trunk, and total body fat; lowered blood pressure; and decreased insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). No serious adverse effects were reported. After 3 months, control diet subjects were crossed over to the FMD program, resulting in a total of 71 subjects completing three FMD cycles. A post hoc analysis of subjects from both FMD arms showed that body mass index, blood pressure, fasting glucose, IGF-1, triglycerides, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and C-reactive protein were more beneficially affected in participants at risk for disease than in subjects who were not at risk. Thus, cycles of a 5-day FMD are safe, feasible, and effective in reducing markers/risk factors for aging and age-related diseases. Larger studies in patients with diagnosed diseases or selected on the basis of risk factors are warranted to confirm the effect of the FMD on disease prevention and treatment.

PMID:
28202779
PMCID:
PMC6816332
DOI:
10.1126/scitranslmed.aai8700
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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