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Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2006 Jan;50(1):43-8.

Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: risk factors and clinical impact.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine VI, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.

Abstract

Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a leading nosocomial pathogen, may become multidrug resistant (MDR). Its rate of occurrence, the individual risk factors among affected patients, and the clinical impact of infection are undetermined. We conducted an epidemiologic evaluation and molecular typing using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of 36 isolates for 82 patients with MDR P. aeruginosa and 82 controls matched by ward, length of hospital stay, and calendar time. A matched case-control study identified individual risk factors for having MDR P. aeruginosa, and a retrospective matched-cohort study examined clinical outcomes of such infections. The 36 isolates belonged to 12 PFGE clones. Two clones dominated, with one originating in an intensive care unit (ICU). Cases and controls had similar demographic characteristics and numbers of comorbid conditions. A multivariate model identified ICU stay, being bedridden, having high invasive devices scores, and being treated with broad-spectrum cephalosporins and with aminoglycosides as significant risk factors for isolating MDR P. aeruginosa. Having a malignant disease was a protective factor (odds ratio [OR] = 0.2; P = 0.03). MDR P. aeruginosa was associated with severe outcomes compared to controls, including increased mortality (OR = 4.4; P = 0.04), hospital stay (hazard ratio, 2; P = 0.001), and requirement for procedures (OR = 5.4; P = 0.001). The survivors functioned more poorly at discharge than the controls, and more of the survivors were discharged to rehabilitation centers or chronic care facilities. The epidemiology of MDR P. aeruginosa is complex. Critically ill patients that require intensive care and are treated with multiple antibiotic agents are at high risk. MDR P. aeruginosa infections are associated with severe adverse clinical outcomes.

PMID:
16377665
PMCID:
PMC1346794
DOI:
10.1128/AAC.50.1.43-48.2006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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