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J Environ Manage. 2015 Sep 15;161:63-71. doi: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2015.06.048. Epub 2015 Jul 4.

Applying behavioral theories to invasive animal management: Towards an integrated framework.

Author information

1
School of Behavioural Cognitive and Social Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia. Electronic address: lmcleod6@myune.edu.au.
2
School of Behavioural Cognitive and Social Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia.
3
School of Behavioural Cognitive and Social Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia; Urban Research Program, Griffith University, 170 Kessels Road, Nathan, QLD 4111, Australia.
4
School of Behavioural Cognitive and Social Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia; ContentLogic, 1/173A Beardy Street, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia.

Abstract

Invasive species wreak an estimated $1.4 trillion in damages globally, each year. To have any hope of reducing this damage, best-practice control strategies must incorporate behavior change interventions. Traditional interventions, based on the knowledge-transfer model, assume that if land managers are properly educated about risks and strategies, they will develop supportive attitudes and implement appropriate control strategies. However, the social sciences have produced a large number of behavioral models and frameworks that demonstrate that knowledge transfer, by itself, fails to change behavior. The challenge then lies in knowing which behavioral model to choose, and when, from a potentially overwhelming 'universe'. In this paper, we review nine behavior theories relevant to invasive species management. We then introduce the Behavior Change Wheel as a tool for integrating these theories into a single practical framework. This framework links drivers of and barriers to behavior change with intervention strategies and policies, in what we consider, from an applied perspective, to be an important advance.

KEYWORDS:

Behavior change wheel; Human behavioral change; Intervention design; Invasive species management; Pest management

PMID:
26151198
DOI:
10.1016/j.jenvman.2015.06.048
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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