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Mol Cancer Res. 2019 Jul;17(7):1519-1530. doi: 10.1158/1541-7786.MCR-18-1361. Epub 2019 Apr 29.

Hyperphosphorylation of CDH1 in Glioblastoma Cancer Stem Cells Attenuates APC/CCDH1 Activity and Pharmacologic Inhibition of APC/CCDH1/CDC20 Compromises Viability.

Author information

1
Department of Radiation Oncology, James Cancer Hospital and Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
2
Neuroscience Graduate Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
3
Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio.
4
Department of Life Sciences, Presidency University, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.
5
Department of Radiation Oncology, James Cancer Hospital and Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. monica.venere@osumc.edu.

Abstract

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor and remains incurable. This is in part due to the cellular heterogeneity within these tumors, which includes a subpopulation of treatment-resistant cells called cancer stem-like cells (CSC). We previously identified that the anaphase-promoting complex/cylosome (APC/C), a key cell-cycle regulator and tumor suppressor, had attenuated ligase activity in CSCs. Here, we assessed the mechanism of reduced activity, as well as the efficacy of pharmacologically targeting the APC/C in CSCs. We identified hyperphosphorylation of CDH1, but not pseudosubstrate inhibition by early mitotic inhibitor 1 (EMI1), as a major mechanism driving attenuated APC/CCDH1 activity in the G1-phase of the cell cycle in CSCs. Small-molecule inhibition of the APC/C reduced viability of both CSCs and nonstem tumor cells (NSTCs), with the combination of proTAME and apcin having the biggest impact. Combinatorial drug treatment also led to the greatest mitotic arrest and chromosomal abnormalities. IMPLICATIONS: Our findings demonstrate how the activity of the APC/CCDH1 tumor suppressor is reduced in CSCs and also validates small-molecule inhibition of the APC/C as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of GBM.

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