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J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2019 Feb 8. pii: JAAPL.003817-19. doi: 10.29158/JAAPL.003817-19. [Epub ahead of print]

Prevalence Rates of Acute Stress Disorder Symptomatology and Association to Juvenile Crime Involvement.

Author information

1
Ms. Pagan is a student in the Department of Criminal Justice, University of New Haven, West Haven, CT. Ms. Wyant is a student in the Department of Psychology, University of New Haven, West Haven, CT. Dr. Chien is Staff Psychiatrist with the Portland VA Health Care System, Portland, OR. Dr. Coker is Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology & Department of Criminal Justice, University of New Haven, West Haven, CT.
2
Ms. Pagan is a student in the Department of Criminal Justice, University of New Haven, West Haven, CT. Ms. Wyant is a student in the Department of Psychology, University of New Haven, West Haven, CT. Dr. Chien is Staff Psychiatrist with the Portland VA Health Care System, Portland, OR. Dr. Coker is Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology & Department of Criminal Justice, University of New Haven, West Haven, CT. jocn16@gmail.com.

Abstract

Little is known about the relationship between acute stress disorder and criminal behavior among youth. This study examined data from the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement (NCS-A). Participants in this survey, which took place between February 2001 and January 2003, consisted of 10,148 youth between the ages of 13 and 18 years. Because the NCS-A was conducted prior to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder from the fourth edition of the DSM were mapped to DSM-5 criteria for ASD. Due to changes in the DSM-5 criteria for ASD, youth in this study were described as having "ASD symptomatology." Youth with ASD symptomatology were significantly more likely to report involvement in crimes than youth without any lifetime diagnosis, regardless of whether the crimes resulted in arrest. The data presented here provide a more accurate picture of the relationship between ASD and crime. These data suggest that it may be useful to develop prevention and intervention strategies that provide education and support to at-risk youth who develop ASD symptoms. The quality of life for untreated youth decreases significantly, and untreated youth are likely at risk for criminal involvement, suicide, and other comorbid psychiatric disorders.

PMID:
30737296
DOI:
10.29158/JAAPL.003817-19

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