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BMJ Open Qual. 2018 Nov 10;7(4):e000417. doi: 10.1136/bmjoq-2018-000417. eCollection 2018.

Interprofessional education model for geriatric falls risk assessment and prevention.

Author information

1
College of Health Professions, The University of Akron, Akron, Ohio, USA.
2
College of Pharmacy, Northeastern Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, Ohio, USA.
3
Department of Pharmacy, Summa Health, Akron, Ohio, USA.
4
School of Health Sciences, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
5
Seniors Institute Research, Summa Health System, Akron, Ohio, USA.
6
Emergency Medicine, Academic and Community Emergency Specialists, Uniontown, Ohio, USA.
7
Senior Health, Summa Health System, Akron, Ohio, USA.
8
Family and Community Medicine, Northeastern Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, Ohio, USA.
9
School of Social Work, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
10
School of Nursing, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
11
School of Counseling, The University of Akron, Akron, Ohio, USA.
12
Planning and Quality Improvement, Direction Home Area Agency on Aging and Disabilities, Akron, Ohio, USA.
13
Department of Statistics, The University of Akron, Akron, Ohio, USA.
14
Summa Health System, Akron, Ohio, USA.
15
Family Medicine, Summa Health System.
16
Emergency Medicine, Summa Health System, Akron, Ohio, United States.

Abstract

Background:

One in three people over the age of 65 fall every year, with 1/3 sustaining at least moderate injury. Falls risk reduction requires an interprofessional health team approach. The literature is lacking in effective models to teach students how to work collaboratively in interprofessional teams for geriatric falls prevention. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, administration and outcome measures of an education programme to teach principles of interprofessional care for older adults in the context of falls prevention.

Methods:

Students from three academic institutions representing 12 health disciplines took part in the education programme over 18 months (n=237). A mixed method one-group pretest and post-test experimental design was implemented to measure the impact of a multistep education model on progression in interprofessional collaboration competencies and satisfaction.

Results:

Paired t-tests of pre-education to posteducation measures of Interprofessional Socialization and Valuing Scale scores (n=136) demonstrated statistically significant increase in subscales and total scores (p<0.001). Qualitative satisfaction results were strongly positive.

Discussion:

Results of this study indicate that active interprofessional education can result in positive student attitude regarding interprofessional team-based care, and satisfaction with learning. Lessons learnt in a rapid cycle plan-do-study-act approach are shared to guide replication efforts for other educators.

Conclusion:

Effective models to teach falls prevention interventions and interprofessional practice are not yet established. This education model is easily replicable and can be used to teach interprofessional teamwork competency skills in falls and other geriatric syndromes.

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