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Psychiatry Res. 2018 Feb;260:384-390. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.11.054. Epub 2017 Nov 28.

Individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder show larger preferred social distance in live dyadic interactions.

Author information

1
Yale University Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT, USA. Electronic address: sarah.fineberg@yale.edu.
2
Yale University Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT, USA.
3
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA.
4
Department of Psychological Medicine and Rehabilitation, Cedars Sinai Medical Center.
5
Yale University Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT, USA; Knox College, Galesburg, IL, USA.
6
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Abstract

Personal space regulation is a key component of effective social engagement. Personal space varies among individuals and with some mental health conditions. Simulated personal space intrusions in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) reveal larger preferred interpersonal distance in that setting. These findings led us to conduct the first test of live interpersonal distance preferences in symptoms in BPD. With direct observation of subjects' personal space behavior in the stop-distance paradigm, we found a 2-fold larger preferred interpersonal distance in BPD than control (n = 30, n = 23). We discuss this result in context of known biology and etiology of BPD. Future work is needed to identify neural circuits underlying personal space regulation in BPD, individual differences in preferred interpersonal distance in relation to specific symptoms and relationship to recovery status.

PMID:
29248760
PMCID:
PMC5972044
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2017.11.054
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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