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J Clin Microbiol. 2017 May;55(5):1299-1312. doi: 10.1128/JCM.01847-16. Epub 2017 Feb 15.

High Prevalence and Diversity of Hepatitis Viruses in Suspected Cases of Yellow Fever in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Author information

1
Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville (CIRMF), Franceville, Gabon shemakiala@yahoo.fr pierre.becquart@ird.fr.
2
Département de Microbiologie, Cliniques Universitaires de Kinshasa (CUK), Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.
3
Hôpital Avicenne, Laboratoire de Virologie, Centre National de Référence associé Hépatite Delta, Bobigny, France.
4
Institut National de Recherche Biomédicale (INRB), Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.
5
Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville (CIRMF), Franceville, Gabon.
6
Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD), Montpellier, France.
7
UMR UMMISCO (UMI 209 IRD-UPMC), Bondy, France.
8
Direction de lutte contre les maladies (DLM), Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.
9
Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 3569, Paris, France.
10
Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD), Montpellier, France shemakiala@yahoo.fr pierre.becquart@ird.fr.

Abstract

The majority of patients with acute febrile jaundice (>95%) identified through a yellow fever surveillance program in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) test negative for antibodies against yellow fever virus. However, no etiological investigation has ever been carried out on these patients. Here, we tested for hepatitis A (HAV), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), hepatitis D (HDV), and hepatitis E (HEV) viruses, all of which can cause acute febrile jaundice, in patients included in the yellow fever surveillance program in the DRC. On a total of 498 serum samples collected from suspected cases of yellow fever from January 2003 to January 2012, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques were used to screen for antibodies against HAV (IgM) and HEV (IgM) and for antigens and antibodies against HBV (HBsAg and anti-hepatitis B core protein [HBc] IgM, respectively), HCV, and HDV. Viral loads and genotypes were determined for HBV and HVD. Viral hepatitis serological markers were diagnosed in 218 (43.7%) patients. The seroprevalences were 16.7% for HAV, 24.6% for HBV, 2.3% for HCV, and 10.4% for HEV, and 26.1% of HBV-positive patients were also infected with HDV. Median viral loads were 4.19 × 105 IU/ml for HBV (range, 769 to 9.82 × 109 IU/ml) and 1.4 × 106 IU/ml for HDV (range, 3.1 × 102 to 2.9 × 108 IU/ml). Genotypes A, E, and D of HBV and genotype 1 of HDV were detected. These high hepatitis prevalence rates highlight the necessity to include screening for hepatitis viruses in the yellow fever surveillance program in the DRC.

KEYWORDS:

DRC; hepatitis virus; yellow fever surveillance

PMID:
28202798
PMCID:
PMC5405249
DOI:
10.1128/JCM.01847-16
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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