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J Environ Manage. 2017 Aug 1;198(Pt 1):233-239. doi: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.04.073. Epub 2017 Apr 29.

Factors influencing smallholder farmers' behavioural intention towards adaptation to climate change in transitional climatic zones: A case study of Hwedza District in Zimbabwe.

Author information

1
Centre for Applied Social Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe. Electronic address: bzamasiya@gmail.com.
2
Centre for Applied Social Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe.

Abstract

This paper examines factors influencing behavioural change among smallholder farmers towards adaptation to climate change in transitional climatic zones of Africa, specifically, Hwedza District in Zimbabwe. Data for this study were collected from 400 randomly-selected smallholder farmers, using a structured questionnaire, focus group discussions and key informant interviews. The study used an ordered logit model to examine the factors that influence smallholder farmers' behavioural intention towards adaptation to climate change. Results from the study show that the gender of the household head, access to extension services on crop and livestock production, access to climate information, membership to social groups and experiencing a drought have a positive influence on farmers' attitude towards adaptation to climate change and variability. The study concluded that although the majority of smallholder farmers perceive that the climate is changing, they continue to habour negative attitudes towards prescribed climate change adaptation techniques. This study recommends more education on climate change, as well as adaptation strategies for both agricultural extension workers and farmers. This can be complemented by disseminating timely climate information through extension officers and farmers' groups.

KEYWORDS:

Climate change and variability; Farmers' attitudes; Smallholder farmers; Zimbabwe

PMID:
28463773
DOI:
10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.04.073
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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