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J Rheumatol. 2016 Jun;43(6):1114-20. doi: 10.3899/jrheum.151200. Epub 2016 Apr 1.

Low-dose Spironolactone: Treatment for Osteoarthritis-related Knee Effusion. A Prospective Clinical and Sonographic-based Study.

Author information

1
From the Department of Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, and the Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag, Egypt; Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany.A.M. Elsaman, MD, Lecturer of Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University; A.R. Radwan, MD, Lecturer of Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University; W.I. Mohammed, MD, Lecturer of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University; S. Ohrndorf, MD, Specialist in Internal Medicine/Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité Universitätsmedizin.
2
From the Department of Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, and the Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag, Egypt; Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany.A.M. Elsaman, MD, Lecturer of Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University; A.R. Radwan, MD, Lecturer of Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University; W.I. Mohammed, MD, Lecturer of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University; S. Ohrndorf, MD, Specialist in Internal Medicine/Rheumatology, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité Universitätsmedizin. sarah.ohrndorf@charite.de.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effectiveness of spironolactone as a treatment for osteoarthritis (OA)-related knee effusion in comparison to ibuprofen, cold compresses, and placebo.

METHODS:

This study was carried out on 200 patients, aged 40 years or older, attending the outpatient clinic of the Rheumatology Department of Sohag University Hospital with unilateral knee effusion related to OA based on clinical examination, musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US), and synovial fluid analysis. In group 1, 50 patients received spironolactone 25 mg daily for 2 weeks; in group 2, 50 patients took ibuprofen 1200 mg daily for 2 weeks; in group 3, 50 patients used cold compresses 2 times daily for 2 weeks; and in group 4, 50 patients received placebo for the same duration. Fluid > 4 mm was considered as effusion. Decrease in fluid to reach below 4-mm thickness was considered complete improvement, and any decrease that did not reach below 4 mm thickness was considered partial improvement.

RESULTS:

The mean age of the participants was 51.2 ± 8.1 years. The mean duration of effusion was 16.5 ± 3.6 days. In group 1, 66% had complete improvement, 20% partial improvement, and 14% no response. In group 2, 24% had complete improvement, 12% partial improvement, and 64% no response. In group 3, 28% had complete improvement, 14% partial improvement, and 58% no response. In group 4, only 6% had complete improvement, 10% partial improvement, and 84% no response.

CONCLUSION:

Low-dose spironolactone is a safe and effective medical treatment for OA-related knee effusion.

KEYWORDS:

KNEE EFFUSION; MUSCULOSKELETAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY; OSTEOARTHRITIS; SPIRONOLACTONE

Comment in

PMID:
27036390
DOI:
10.3899/jrheum.151200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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