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Eur J Pharmacol. 2015 Sep 15;763(Pt B):143-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ejphar.2015.05.019. Epub 2015 May 14.

GPCR signaling and cardiac function.

Author information

1
From the Laboratory for the Study of Neurohormonal Control of the Circulation, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nova Southeastern University College of Pharmacy, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33328, USA.
2
From the Laboratory for the Study of Neurohormonal Control of the Circulation, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nova Southeastern University College of Pharmacy, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33328, USA. Electronic address: al806@nova.edu.

Abstract

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), such as β-adrenergic and angiotensin II receptors, located in the membranes of all three major cardiac cell types, i.e. myocytes, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, play crucial roles in regulating cardiac function and morphology. Their importance in cardiac physiology and disease is reflected by the fact that, collectively, they represent the direct targets of over a third of the currently approved cardiovascular drugs used in clinical practice. Over the past few decades, advances in elucidation of their structure, function and the signaling pathways they elicit, specifically in the heart, have led to identification of an increasing number of new molecular targets for heart disease therapy. Here, we review these signaling modalities employed by GPCRs known to be expressed in the cardiac myocyte membranes and to directly modulate cardiac contractility. We also highlight drugs and drug classes that directly target these GPCRs to modulate cardiac function, as well as molecules involved in cardiac GPCR signaling that have the potential of becoming novel drug targets for modulation of cardiac function in the future.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiac; Contractility; G protein-coupled receptor; Signaling; Therapeutic target

PMID:
25981298
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejphar.2015.05.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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