Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Transl Med. 2016 Nov 23;8(366):366ra165.

A soft, wearable microfluidic device for the capture, storage, and colorimetric sensing of sweat.

Author information

1
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
2
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749, Korea.
3
Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.
4
L'Oréal Technology Incubator, San Francisco, CA 94107, USA.
5
Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea.
6
L'Oréal Research and Innovation, Aulnay-sous-Bois, France.
7
L'Oréal Early Clinical, Clark, NJ 07066, USA.
8
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Institute of Chemical Machinery and Process Equipment, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, People's Republic of China.
9
Department of Medicine and Biomedical Engineering, Sarver Heart Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA.
10
MC10 Inc., Cambridge, MA 02140, USA.
11
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. jrogers@illinois.edu.

Abstract

Capabilities in health monitoring enabled by capture and quantitative chemical analysis of sweat could complement, or potentially obviate the need for, approaches based on sporadic assessment of blood samples. Established sweat monitoring technologies use simple fabric swatches and are limited to basic analysis in controlled laboratory or hospital settings. We present a collection of materials and device designs for soft, flexible, and stretchable microfluidic systems, including embodiments that integrate wireless communication electronics, which can intimately and robustly bond to the surface of the skin without chemical and mechanical irritation. This integration defines access points for a small set of sweat glands such that perspiration spontaneously initiates routing of sweat through a microfluidic network and set of reservoirs. Embedded chemical analyses respond in colorimetric fashion to markers such as chloride and hydronium ions, glucose, and lactate. Wireless interfaces to digital image capture hardware serve as a means for quantitation. Human studies demonstrated the functionality of this microfluidic device during fitness cycling in a controlled environment and during long-distance bicycle racing in arid, outdoor conditions. The results include quantitative values for sweat rate, total sweat loss, pH, and concentration of chloride and lactate.

PMID:
27881826
PMCID:
PMC5429097
DOI:
10.1126/scitranslmed.aaf2593
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center