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Cancer Discov. 2018 Jun;8(6):764-779. doi: 10.1158/2159-8290.CD-17-0867. Epub 2018 Mar 26.

Identification of Pik3ca Mutation as a Genetic Driver of Prostate Cancer That Cooperates with Pten Loss to Accelerate Progression and Castration-Resistant Growth.

Author information

1
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. PearsonH2@cardiff.ac.uk.
2
The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, the University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
3
European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute, Haydn Ellis Building, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
4
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
5
Department of Pathology, the University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
6
Cancer Program, Biomedicine Discovery Institute and Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.
7
Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics, ACRF RPPA Platform, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
8
Maurice Wilkins Centre for Molecular Biodiscovery, the University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
9
Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, the University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
10
Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia.
11
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, the University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
12
CRUK Beatson Institute, Garscube Estate, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
13
Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
14
Department of Surgery (St. Vincent's Hospital), the University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
15
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

Genetic alterations that potentiate PI3K signaling are frequent in prostate cancer, yet how different genetic drivers of the PI3K cascade contribute to prostate cancer is unclear. Here, we report PIK3CA mutation/amplification correlates with poor survival of patients with prostate cancer. To interrogate the requirement of different PI3K genetic drivers in prostate cancer, we employed a genetic approach to mutate Pik3ca in mouse prostate epithelium. We show Pik3caH1047R mutation causes p110α-dependent invasive prostate carcinoma in vivo Furthermore, we report that PIK3CA mutation and PTEN loss coexist in patients with prostate cancer and can cooperate in vivo to accelerate disease progression via AKT-mTORC1/2 hyperactivation. Contrasting single mutants that slowly acquire castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), concomitant Pik3ca mutation and Pten loss caused de novo CRPC. Thus, Pik3ca mutation and Pten deletion are not functionally redundant. Our findings indicate that PIK3CA mutation is an attractive prognostic indicator for prostate cancer that may cooperate with PTEN loss to facilitate CRPC in patients.Significance: We show PIK3CA mutation correlates with poor prostate cancer prognosis and causes prostate cancer in mice. Moreover, PIK3CA mutation and PTEN loss coexist in prostate cancer and can cooperate in vivo to accelerate tumorigenesis and facilitate CRPC. Delineating this synergistic relationship may present new therapeutic/prognostic approaches to overcome castration/PI3K-AKT-mTORC1/2 inhibitor resistance. Cancer Discov; 8(6); 764-79. ©2018 AACR.See related commentary by Triscott and Rubin, p. 682This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 663.

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