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G3 (Bethesda). 2019 Aug 8;9(8):2723-2737. doi: 10.1534/g3.119.400229.

Comparative Transcriptome Analyses Revealed Conserved and Novel Responses to Cold and Freezing Stress in Brassica napus L.

Author information

1
Southern Regional Collaborative Innovation Center for Grain and Oil Crops in China, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, Hunan, China 410128 and.
2
Southern Regional Collaborative Innovation Center for Grain and Oil Crops in China, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, Hunan, China 410128 and huawei@oilcrops.cn.
3
Key Laboratory of Biology and Genetic Improvement of Oil Crops, Ministry of Agriculture, Oil Crops Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Wuhan, China.

Abstract

Oil rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is a typical winter biennial plant, with high cold tolerance during vegetative stage. In recent years, more and more early-maturing rapeseed varieties were planted across China. Unfortunately, the early-maturing rapeseed varieties with low cold tolerance have higher risk of freeze injury in cold winter and spring. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms for coping with different low-temperature stress conditions in rapeseed. In this study, we investigated 47,328 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of two early-maturing rapeseed varieties with different cold tolerance treated with cold shock at chilling (4°) and freezing (-4°) temperatures, as well as chilling and freezing stress following cold acclimation or control conditions. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis indicated that two conserved (the primary metabolism and plant hormone signal transduction) and two novel (plant-pathogen interaction pathway and circadian rhythms pathway) signaling pathways were significantly enriched with differentially-expressed transcripts. Our results provided a foundation for understanding the low-temperature stress response mechanisms of rapeseed. We also propose new ideas and candidate genes for genetic improvement of rapeseed tolerance to cold stresses.

KEYWORDS:

Transcriptome; chilling; cold acclimation; cold shock; freezing; rapeseed

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