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Sci Rep. 2019 Nov 12;9(1):16569. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-53105-5.

Y-chromosome haplogroups from Hun, Avar and conquering Hungarian period nomadic people of the Carpathian Basin.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics, University of Szeged, Szeged, H-6726, Hungary.
2
Department of Pediatrics and Pediatric Health Center, University of Szeged, Szeged, H-6720, Hungary.
3
SeqOmics Biotechnology Ltd., Mórahalom, H-6782, Hungary.
4
Institute of Biochemistry, Biological Research Centre of the Hun. Acad. Sci, Szeged, H-6726, Hungary.
5
Department of Anthropology, Hungarian Natural History Museum, Budapest, H-1083, Hungary.
6
Department of Biological Anthropology, University of Szeged, Szeged, H-6726, Hungary.
7
Department of Art History, Istanbul Medeniyet University, Istanbul, 34700, Turkey.
8
Móra Ferenc Museum, Szeged, H-6720, Hungary.
9
Mureş County Museum, Târgu Mureș, 540329, Romania.
10
Department of Archaeology, Flóris Rómer Museum of Art and History, H-9024, Győr, Hungary.
11
Katona József Museum, Kecskemét, H-6000, Hungary.
12
Institute of Archaeology of the Center for Humanities of the Hun. Acad. Sci, Budapest, Hungary.
13
Institute of Genetics, Biological Research Centre of the Hun. Acad. Sci, Szeged, H-6726, Hungary.
14
Department of Genetics, University of Szeged, Szeged, H-6726, Hungary. torokt@bio.u-szeged.hu.

Abstract

Hun, Avar and conquering Hungarian nomadic groups arrived to the Carpathian Basin from the Eurasian Steppes and significantly influenced its political and ethnical landscape, however their origin remains largely unknown. In order to shed light on the genetic affinity of above groups we have determined Y chromosomal haplogroups and autosomal loci, suitable to predict biogeographic ancestry, from 49 individuals, supposed to represent the power/military elit. Haplogroups from the Hun-age are consistent with Xiongnu ancestry of European Huns. Most of the Avar-age individuals carry east Eurasian Y haplogroups typical for modern north-eastern Siberian and Buryat populations and their autosomal loci indicate mostly un-admixed Asian characteristics. In contrast the conquering Hungarians seem to be a recently assembled population incorporating un-admixed European, Asian as well as admixed components. Their heterogeneous paternal and maternal lineages indicate similar supposed phylogeographic origin of males and females, derived from Central-Inner Asian and European Pontic Steppe sources.

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