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J Soc Psychol. 2015;155(6):590-604. doi: 10.1080/00224545.2015.1032195. Epub 2015 Mar 26.

The Face of the Chameleon: The Experience of Facial Mimicry for the Mimicker and the Mimickee.

Author information

1
a University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Poznan Faculty.
2
b Florida Atlantic University.
3
c University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw Faculty.
4
d University of Warsaw.

Abstract

This research addressed three questions concerning facial mimicry: (a) Does the relationship between mimicry and liking characterize all facial expressions, or is it limited to specific expressions? (b) Is the relationship between facial mimicry and liking symmetrical for the mimicker and the mimickee? (c) Does conscious mimicry have consequences for emotion recognition? A paradigm is introduced in which participants interact over a computer setup with a confederate whose prerecorded facial displays of emotion are synchronized with participants' behavior to create the illusion of social interaction. In Experiment 1, the confederate did or did not mimic participants' facial displays of various subsets of basic emotions. Mimicry promoted greater liking for the confederate regardless of which emotions were mimicked. Experiment 2 reversed these roles: participants were instructed to mimic or not to mimic the confederate's facial displays. Mimicry did not affect liking for the confederate but it did impair emotion recognition.

KEYWORDS:

attitudes; attraction; impression formation; social interaction; social perception

PMID:
25811746
PMCID:
PMC4642179
DOI:
10.1080/00224545.2015.1032195
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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