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Nucleic Acids Res. 2015 Jul 27;43(13):6620-30. doi: 10.1093/nar/gkv466. Epub 2015 May 8.

Versatile genetic assembly system (VEGAS) to assemble pathways for expression in S. cerevisiae.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University Langone School of Medicine, New York City, NY 10016, USA Institute for Systems Genetics, New York University Langone School of Medicine, New York City, NY 10016, USA High Throughput Biology Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
2
High Throughput Biology Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA Department of Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Genetic Medicine, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.
3
High Throughput Biology Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
4
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University Langone School of Medicine, New York City, NY 10016, USA Institute for Systems Genetics, New York University Langone School of Medicine, New York City, NY 10016, USA.
5
DSM Nutritional Products, Lexington, MA 02421, USA.
6
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University Langone School of Medicine, New York City, NY 10016, USA Institute for Systems Genetics, New York University Langone School of Medicine, New York City, NY 10016, USA High Throughput Biology Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA jef.boeke@nyumc.org.

Abstract

We have developed a method for assembling genetic pathways for expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our pathway assembly method, called VEGAS (Versatile genetic assembly system), exploits the native capacity of S. cerevisiae to perform homologous recombination and efficiently join sequences with terminal homology. In the VEGAS workflow, terminal homology between adjacent pathway genes and the assembly vector is encoded by 'VEGAS adapter' (VA) sequences, which are orthogonal in sequence with respect to the yeast genome. Prior to pathway assembly by VEGAS in S. cerevisiae, each gene is assigned an appropriate pair of VAs and assembled using a previously described technique called yeast Golden Gate (yGG). Here we describe the application of yGG specifically to building transcription units for VEGAS assembly as well as the VEGAS methodology. We demonstrate the assembly of four-, five- and six-gene pathways by VEGAS to generate S. cerevisiae cells synthesizing β-carotene and violacein. Moreover, we demonstrate the capacity of yGG coupled to VEGAS for combinatorial assembly.

PMID:
25956652
PMCID:
PMC4513848
DOI:
10.1093/nar/gkv466
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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