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Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Nov;81(21):7633-43. doi: 10.1128/AEM.01713-15. Epub 2015 Sep 4.

Eradication of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and of Enterobacteriaceae expressing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases on a model pig farm.

Author information

1
Institute of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn, Germany Institute of Animal Science, Preventive Health Management Group, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany ricarda.schmithausen@ukb.uni-bonn.de isabelle.bekeredjian-ding@pei.de.
2
Institute of Animal Science, Preventive Health Management Group, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
3
Institute for Hygiene and Public Health, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
4
Institute of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
5
Institute of Medical Biometry, Epidemiology and Computer Science, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
6
Antiinfectives Intelligence GmbH, Campus University of Applied Sciences Bonn-Rhein-Sieg, Rheinbach, Germany.
7
Chamber of Agriculture of North Rhine-Westphalia, Bonn, Germany.
8
Institute of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn, Germany Division of Microbiology, Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Langen, Germany ricarda.schmithausen@ukb.uni-bonn.de isabelle.bekeredjian-ding@pei.de.

Abstract

Colonization of livestock with bacteria resistant to antibiotics is considered a risk for the entry of drug-resistant pathogens into the food chain. For this reason, there is a need for novel concepts to address the eradication of drug-resistant commensals on farms. In the present report, we evaluated the decontamination measures taken on a farm contaminated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Enterobacteriaceae expressing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL-E). The decontamination process preceded the conversion from piglet breeding to gilt production. Microbiological surveillance showed that the decontamination measures eliminated the MRSA and ESBL-E strains that were detected on the farm before the complete removal of pigs, cleaning and disinfection of the stable, and construction of an additional stable meeting high-quality standards. After pig production was restarted, ESBL-E remained undetectable over 12 months, but MRSA was recovered from pigs and the environment within the first 2 days. However, spa (Staphylococcus aureus protein A gene) typing revealed acquisition of an MRSA strain (type t034) that had not been detected before decontamination. Interestingly, we observed that a farmworker who had been colonized with the prior MRSA strain (t2011) acquired the new strain (t034) after 2 months. In summary, this report demonstrates that decontamination protocols similar to those used here can lead to successful elimination of contaminating MRSA and ESBL-E in pigs and the stable environment. Nevertheless, decontamination protocols do not prevent the acquisition of new MRSA strains.

PMID:
26341200
PMCID:
PMC4592854
DOI:
10.1128/AEM.01713-15
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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