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Science. 2017 Mar 24;355(6331). pii: eaaj1497. doi: 10.1126/science.aaj1497. Epub 2017 Mar 9.

Dynamics of cortical dendritic membrane potential and spikes in freely behaving rats.

Moore JJ1,2, Ravassard PM3,4, Ho D3,2, Acharya L3,5, Kees AL3,2, Vuong C3,4, Mehta MR1,2,4,6.

Author information

1
W. M. Keck Center for Neurophysics, Integrative Center for Learning and Memory, and Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. jason.moore@ucla.edu mayankmehta@ucla.edu.
2
Neuroscience Interdepartmental Program, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
3
W. M. Keck Center for Neurophysics, Integrative Center for Learning and Memory, and Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
4
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
5
Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
6
Departments of Neurology and Neurobiology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

Abstract

Neural activity in vivo is primarily measured using extracellular somatic spikes, which provide limited information about neural computation. Hence, it is necessary to record from neuronal dendrites, which can generate dendritic action potentials (DAPs) in vitro, which can profoundly influence neural computation and plasticity. We measured neocortical sub- and suprathreshold dendritic membrane potential (DMP) from putative distal-most dendrites using tetrodes in freely behaving rats over multiple days with a high degree of stability and submillisecond temporal resolution. DAP firing rates were several-fold larger than somatic rates. DAP rates were also modulated by subthreshold DMP fluctuations, which were far larger than DAP amplitude, indicating hybrid, analog-digital coding in the dendrites. Parietal DAP and DMP exhibited egocentric spatial maps comparable to pyramidal neurons. These results have important implications for neural coding and plasticity.

PMID:
28280248
DOI:
10.1126/science.aaj1497
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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