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Science. 2019 Mar 1;363(6430). pii: eaav4236. doi: 10.1126/science.aav4236.

Pantropical climate interactions.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Physical Oceanography-Institute for Advanced Ocean Studies, Ocean University of China and Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Yushan Road, Qingdao 266003, China.
2
Centre for Southern Hemisphere Oceans Research (CSHOR), CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Hobart 7004, TAS, Australia.
3
Key Laboratory of Physical Oceanography-Institute for Advanced Ocean Studies, Ocean University of China and Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Yushan Road, Qingdao 266003, China. lxwu@qnlm.ac.
4
Sorbonne Universités (UPMC, Univ Paris 06)-CNRS-IRD-MNHN, LOCEAN Laboratory, IPSL, 75005 Paris, France.
5
Indo-French Cell for Water Sciences, IISc-NIO-IITM-IRD Joint International Laboratory, National Institute of Oceanography, 403004 Dona Paula, India.
6
Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, 2525 Correa Road, Honolulu, HI 96825, USA.
7
School of Earth Atmosphere and Environment, Monash University, Clayton 3800, VIC, Australia.
8
ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes, Monash University, Clayton 3800, VIC, Australia.
9
Division of Environmental Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), 77 Cheonam-Ro, Nam-Gu, Pohang 37673, South Korea.
10
Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, 3315 Croul Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-3100, USA.
11
Center for Climate Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Busan 46241, Republic of Korea.
12
Pusan National University, Busan 46241, Republic of Korea.
13
Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes, Level 4 Mathews Building, The University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW, Australia.
14
Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China.
15
Department of Oceanography, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 61186, South Korea.
16
Department of Plants, Soils, and Climate, Utah State University, 4820 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, USA.
17
NOAA-Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA 98115, USA.
18
State Key Laboratory of Tropical Oceanography, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510301, China.
19
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China.
20
ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes, School of Earth, Atmosphere, and Environment, Monash University, Rainforest Walk 9, Clayton 3800, VIC, Australia.
21
Key Laboratory of Ocean Circulation and Waves, Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China.
22
College of Engineering, Mathematics, and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, North Park Road, Exeter EX4 4QE, UK.
23
Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Allegaten 70, 5007 Bergen, Norway.
24
Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, N-5006 Bergen, Norway.
25
Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster, Ministry of Education (KLME)-Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environmental Change (ILCEC)-Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CIC-FEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China.
26
UMR5318 CECI CNRS-CERFACS, 31057 Toulouse, France.
27
Departamento de Física de la Tierra y Astrofísica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), 28040 Madrid, Spain.
28
Barcelona Supercomputing Center, 08034 Barcelona, Spain.
29
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
30
College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China.
31
School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 44919, Republic of Korea.
32
Department of Oceanography, 3146 TAMU, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA.

Abstract

The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which originates in the Pacific, is the strongest and most well-known mode of tropical climate variability. Its reach is global, and it can force climate variations of the tropical Atlantic and Indian Oceans by perturbing the global atmospheric circulation. Less appreciated is how the tropical Atlantic and Indian Oceans affect the Pacific. Especially noteworthy is the multidecadal Atlantic warming that began in the late 1990s, because recent research suggests that it has influenced Indo-Pacific climate, the character of the ENSO cycle, and the hiatus in global surface warming. Discovery of these pantropical interactions provides a pathway forward for improving predictions of climate variability in the current climate and for refining projections of future climate under different anthropogenic forcing scenarios.

PMID:
30819937
DOI:
10.1126/science.aav4236

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