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Respir Care. 2018 Sep 25. pii: respcare.06302. doi: 10.4187/respcare.06302. [Epub ahead of print]

Imperative Instruction for Pressurized Metered-Dose Inhalers: Provider Perspectives.

Author information

1
University of California San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California.
2
Division of Hospital Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California.
3
Division of Academic General Pediatrics, Child Development, and Community Health, Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California.
4
Rady Children's Hospital and Health Centers, Division of Hospital Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, California.
5
Rady Children's Hospital and Health Centers, Division of Hospital Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, California. estucky@rchsd.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Reports show that many patients do not use their pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs) effectively. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute recommends that health-care providers educate and assess patients' pMDI technique at each opportunity. However, limited data exist regarding how often pediatric primary care providers perform assessments and which methods they use. We sought to (1) identify instructional methods used to teach pMDI use, (2) describe how pMDI use is reassessed at follow-up visits, and (3) describe primary care provider attitudes and barriers to in-office pMDI instruction.

METHODS:

A 34-item electronic survey was distributed from August to December 2016 via E-mail to local pediatric primary care providers. Descriptive statistics were used for analysis.

RESULTS:

Sixty two of 223 potential primary care providers (28%) responded. Physicians and nurse practitioners were identified most often as the providers of pMDI education (53%). When first prescribing a pMDI, only 10% reported having the patient practice inhaler use in the office and receive feedback. Only 19% "always" reassessed the technique, even for patients with poorly controlled asthma. Among those who reassessed the technique, most (76%) did so verbally, and only 42% asked the patients to demonstrate pMDI use. Only 32% reported that typical patient education in their setting was adequate to ensure proper pMDI use. Commonly cited barriers included time (84%) and access to demo pMDIs (67%). Provider solutions included video tutorials and access to demo inhalers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Many pediatric primary care providers did not demonstrate or have patients practice pMDI use when teaching or assessing pMDI technique, and the reassessment rate was low even for patients with poorly controlled asthma. Identifying and training a consistent pMDI educator and obtaining demo pMDIs may abate some barriers. Respiratory therapists could appropriately fulfill this educator role. Brief, repeated pMDI practice for motor learning could promote more stable pMDI mastery.

KEYWORDS:

asthma; education; metered-dose inhaler; motor learning; reassessment; technique

PMID:
30254041
DOI:
10.4187/respcare.06302

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have disclosed no conflicts of interest.

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