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Sci Adv. 2016 Apr 22;2(4):e1501616. doi: 10.1126/sciadv.1501616. eCollection 2016 Apr.

The evolving interaction of low-frequency earthquakes during transient slip.

Author information

1
Équipe de Sismologie, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Paris Sorbonne Cité, CNRS, 75238 Paris, France.; Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
2
Équipe de Sismologie, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Paris Sorbonne Cité, CNRS, 75238 Paris, France.; Institute of Volcanology and Seismology FEB RAS, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky 683006, Russia.
3
Instituto de Geofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04150 Ciudad de México, Mexico.
4
Institute of Volcanology and Seismology FEB RAS, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky 683006, Russia.
5
Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.; Institut des Sciences de la Terre (ISTerre), Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, IRD, 38610 Gières, France.

Abstract

Observed along the roots of seismogenic faults where the locked interface transitions to a stably sliding one, low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) primarily occur as event bursts during slow slip. Using an event catalog from Guerrero, Mexico, we employ a statistical analysis to consider the sequence of LFEs at a single asperity as a point process, and deduce the level of time clustering from the shape of its autocorrelation function. We show that while the plate interface remains locked, LFEs behave as a simple Poisson process, whereas they become strongly clustered in time during even the smallest slow slip, consistent with interaction between different LFE sources. Our results demonstrate that bursts of LFEs can result from the collective behavior of asperities whose interaction depends on the state of the fault interface.

KEYWORDS:

low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs); seismology; slow earthquakes

PMID:
27152345
PMCID:
PMC4846440
DOI:
10.1126/sciadv.1501616
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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