Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PM R. 2017 Feb;9(2):113-119. doi: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2016.06.015. Epub 2016 Jun 23.

Early Rehabilitation in the Medical and Surgical Intensive Care Units for Patients With and Without Mechanical Ventilation: An Interprofessional Performance Improvement Project.

Author information

1
Rusk Rehabilitation Therapy Services and New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY(∗).
2
Rusk Rehabilitation Therapy Services and New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY(†).
3
Rusk Rehabilitation Therapy Services and New York University School of Medicine, 240 East 38(th) Street, 17-48, New York, NY 10016(‡). Electronic address: tamara.bushnik@nyumc.org.
4
Rusk Rehabilitation Therapy Services and New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY(§).
5
Rusk Rehabilitation Therapy Services and New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY(¶).
6
Rusk Rehabilitation Therapy Services and New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY(#).
7
Critical Care Services (SICU/CVCU)/Alert Team, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY(‖).
8
Rusk Rehabilitation and Rehabilitation Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY(∗∗).
9
New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY(††).
10
Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation & Rusk Outreach and Growth, Rehabilitation Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY(‡‡).
11
Rusk Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY(§§).

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Most early mobility studies focus on patients on mechanical ventilation and the role of physical and occupational therapy. This Performance Improvement Project (PIP) project examined early mobility and increased intensity of therapy services on patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) with and without mechanical ventilation. In addition, speech-language pathology rehabilitation was added to the early mobilization program.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to assess the efficacy of early mobilization of patients with and without mechanical ventilation in the ICU on length of stay (LOS) and patient outcomes and to determine the financial viability of the program.

DESIGN:

PIP. Prospective data collection in 2014 (PIP) compared with a historical patient population in 2012 (pre-PIP).

SETTING:

Medical and surgical ICUs of a Level 2 trauma hospital.

PATIENTS:

There were 160 patients in the PIP and 123 in the pre-PIP.

INTERVENTIONS:

Interprofessional training to improve collaboration and increase intensity of rehabilitation therapy services in the medical and surgical intensive care units for medically appropriate patients.

MEASUREMENTS:

Demographics; intensity of service; ICU and hospital LOS; medications; pain; discharge disposition; functional mobility; and average cost per day were examined.

MAIN RESULTS:

Rehabilitation therapy services increased from 2012 to 2014 by approximately 60 minutes per patient. The average ICU LOS decreased by almost 20% from 4.6 days (pre-PIP) to 3.7 days (PIP) (P = .05). A decrease of over 40% was observed in the floor bed average LOS from 6.0 days (pre-PIP) to 3.4 days (PIP) (P < .01). An increased percentage of PIP patients, 40.5%, were discharged home without services compared with 18.2% in the pre-PIP phase (P < .01). Average cost per day in the ICU and floor bed decreased in the PIP group, resulting in an annualized net cost savings of $1.5 million.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of the PIP indicate that enhanced rehabilitation services in the ICU is clinically feasible, results in improved patient outcomes, and is fiscally sound. Most early mobility studies focus on patients on mechanical ventilation. The results of this PIP project demonstrate that there are significant benefits to early mobility and increased intensity of therapy services on ICU patients with and without mechanical ventilation. Benefits include reduced hospitalization LOS, decreased health care costs, and decreased need for postacute care services.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

III.

PMID:
27346093
DOI:
10.1016/j.pmrj.2016.06.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center