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J Dent Educ. 2016 Mar;80(3):311-7.

Dental Students' Perceived Value of Peer-Mentoring Clinical Leadership Experiences.

Author information

1
Dr. Sheridan is a Periodontics Resident, Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of Dentistry; Dr. Hammaker is Adjunct Clinical Lecturer, Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences, and Endodontics, as well as a Prosthodontics Resident, Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, Division of Prosthodontics, University of Michigan School of Dentistry; Dr. de Peralta is Associate Professor, Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences, and Endodontics, University of Michigan School of Dentistry; and Dr. Fitzgerald is Associate Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences, and Endodontics, University of Michigan School of Dentistry.
2
Dr. Sheridan is a Periodontics Resident, Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of Dentistry; Dr. Hammaker is Adjunct Clinical Lecturer, Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences, and Endodontics, as well as a Prosthodontics Resident, Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, Division of Prosthodontics, University of Michigan School of Dentistry; Dr. de Peralta is Associate Professor, Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences, and Endodontics, University of Michigan School of Dentistry; and Dr. Fitzgerald is Associate Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences, and Endodontics, University of Michigan School of Dentistry. markfitz@umich.edu.

Abstract

This pilot study compared second- and fourth-year dental students' perceived values of newly implemented clinical leadership experiences (CLEs) at one U.S. dental school during the 2012-13 academic year. In the CLEs, fourth-year (D4) students mentored second-year (D2) dental students during faculty-supervised patient treatment. The two cohorts' perceived value of the experiences was measured with questionnaires consisting of five-point Likert scale questions and open text responses. Out of a total of 114 D2 and 109 D4 students, 46 D2 students and 35 D4 students participated (response rates of 40.4% and 32.1%, respectively). While responses from both cohorts showed they highly valued the CLEs, the D2s perceived greater value: 4.07 (0.53) v. 3.51 (0.95), p<0.003. Both cohorts reported feeling that D4s were prepared to mentor D2s, that the CLEs had educational benefits, and that the CLEs increased their comfort with peer communication. Theme analysis of open text questions revealed that the respondents perceived the D4s were more accessible than faculty and provided guidance and individual attention; the CLEs increased student comfort; the CLEs reinforced D4 skills, knowledge, and confidence; and the CLEs provided management, leadership, and collaborative work experience. Theme analysis also highlighted student concerns about a lack of program structure. Overall, the majority of both groups valued CLEs in their dental education. Particular advantages they perceived were increased comfort, guidance, and attention. Further program development should address student concerns. These results suggest that similar programs should be considered and/or expanded in other dental schools' curricula.

KEYWORDS:

dental education; dental students; peer mentoring; peer teaching; situational learning

PMID:
26933106
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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