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Science. 2017 Apr 21;356(6335):270-275. doi: 10.1126/science.aam9317.

Biodiversity losses and conservation responses in the Anthropocene.

Author information

1
School of Biological Sciences and Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 55, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia. c.n.johnson@utas.edu.au.
2
Conservation Science Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK.
3
School of Biological Sciences and Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 55, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia.
4
Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Departamento de Ecologia, 13506-900 Rio Claro, São Paulo, Brazil.
5
School of Nature Conservation, Beijing Forestry University, 100083 Beijing, People's Republic of China.
6
Long-Term Ecology Laboratory, Landcare Research, Post Office Box 69040, Lincoln 7640, New Zealand.
7
School of Environment, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

Biodiversity is essential to human well-being, but people have been reducing biodiversity throughout human history. Loss of species and degradation of ecosystems are likely to further accelerate in the coming years. Our understanding of this crisis is now clear, and world leaders have pledged to avert it. Nonetheless, global goals to reduce the rate of biodiversity loss have mostly not been achieved. However, many examples of conservation success show that losses can be halted and even reversed. Building on these lessons to turn the tide of biodiversity loss will require bold and innovative action to transform historical relationships between human populations and nature.

PMID:
28428393
DOI:
10.1126/science.aam9317
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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